Acute Care

Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

Triangle of Care in Wales

Carers Trust Wales and the Royal College of Nursing are delighted to have been able to explore an adaptation of the Triangle of Care to meet the needs of carers of people with dementia in acute hospitals in Wales.
Area of Care: 
Secondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health care
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, May 9, 2018 - 13:15
Body: 

The Triangle of Care, Carers Included: A Guide to Best Practice in Dementia Care, Wales Edition

Carers Trust Wales has been extremely keen to build on the success of the Triangle of Care model in England and Scotland  by advocating and supporting the implementation of the Triangle of Care standards for carers accessing services in local health boards across Wales.

Funded through the RCN Foundation, the recent development of a Triangle of Care for dementia Wales edition has been a collaborative effort between the Royal College of Nursing and Carers Trust Wales. It has been developed from the original Triangle of Care for dementia, which was co-designed with carers, people with dementia and practitioners, with the support of Uniting Carers and Dementia UK. 

Overview

According to the National Assembly for Wales Research Service, dementia is the top health concern in Wales and yet Wales has the lowest rate of diagnosis across all UK nations at just 43%. There are an estimated 45,000 people in Wales currently living with dementia and this figure is predicted to rise steadily over the next decade bringing with it dramatic financial and human impact. The cost to the Welsh economy is an estimated £1.4bn a year which includes costs to the NHS and social services, although research shows that people with dementia, carers and their families currently bear around two-thirds of the costs themselves (National Assembly for Wales Research Service, 2016).

In Wales, 50% of health boards have shown an active interest in implementing a Triangle of Care model and support is growing within other health boards throughout Wales. We hope the new Welsh edition for best practice in dementia care can lead to consistent carer involvement and support across all health and social care services irrespective of where and when a person is being treated. The partnership between Carers Trust and the Royal College of Nursing has been incredibly positive and we hope that this can be replicated across health services with nurses and carers working as partners.

Further information

For further information on the Triangle of Care in Wales contact Gill Winter, Carers Partnership Manager, Carers Trust Wales.

 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Triangle of Carer Carers Included: A Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care, Wales editionPDF icon Triongl Gofal Cynnwys Gofalwyr: Canllaw i Arfer Gorau ar gyfer Gofal Dementia, Argraffiad Cymru
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Research

A survey of the experiences and needs of male carers

Husband, Partner, Dad, Son, Carer? is the report of a survey of the experiences and needs of male carers, carried out by Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum at the start of 2014.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSecondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingCarer awarenessCarers in employment
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 10:15
Body: 

Caring is often seen as a ‘female’ issue but it is something that affects a large number of men too. The 2011 Census found that in England and Wales more than four in ten carers are male (42.3%) - amounting to 2.44 million men providing care, unpaid, for a friend or family member who due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction.

Despite their vast number, there has been little research to understand the experiences of these men or the vital role that they play in their families.

Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum sought to learn more about men’s experiences of caring, the impact it has on their lives and the support services they feel would be helpful to them. A total of 609 male carers from across the UK took part in a survey which included 119 fathers, all of whom were caring for a child or children with a disability, long term conditions or mental health or addiction issue. PDF iconDads care too: A survey of the experiences of fathers who are carers showcases the experiences of these dads.

Key findings

  • 119 dads responded, of all ages.
  • The highest proportion (72%) care for a son or daughter with a learning disability or autism.
  •  Nearly 20% had been caring for 21 years or more.
  • 35% cared alongside being in employment. 40% of those spent 60 or more hours caring per week.
  • A third of dads reported that they never get a break.
  • 46% said caring had a negative impact on their mental health, and 43% said it had a negative impact on their physical health.
  • Almost three quarters said they missed out on spending time with friends and family members as a result of being a carer.
  • The most common support wanted but not received was breaks from their caring role.
  • 55% said they felt the needs of male carers were different from female carers.
  • Many felt their role as a carer was not recognised, or that services were not designed in a way which met their needs.

Further information

Download Dads Care too.

Read the reportPDF iconHusband, Partner, Dad, Son, Carer: A Survey of the Experiences and Needs of Male Carers

Exexutive Summary (PDF iconEnglish language version(PDF, 1,728KB).

Executive Summary (PDF iconWelsh_language version(PDF, 728KB).

Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Research

A Road Less Rocky Supporting Carers of People with Dementia

A Road Less Rocky is a report from Carers Trust that found that carers of people with dementia are not getting the support and advice they often desperately need.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 14:00
Body: 

The report found that there were a number of critical points along a carer’s journey where they would most value information and support. These critical points include:

  1. When dementia is diagnosed.
  2. When the carer takes on an 'active' caring role.
  3. When the capacity of the person with dementia declines.
  4. When the carer needs emotional support and/or a break from caring.
  5. When the person with dementia loses their mobility.
  6. When the person with dementia has other health problems.
  7. When the carer has to cope with behavioural problems.
  8. When the carer's own circumstances change.
  9. When the person with dementia becomes incontinent.
  10. When decisions about residential care and end of life care have to be made

We have designed a toolkit around these ten points,the issues carers face at these points and what will make a positive difference. It has been produced to sit alongside A Road Less Rocky and gives guidance to professionals who come in contact with carers. The toolkit is useful for anyone who works with or treats patients with dementia and is therefore likely to come into contact with carers. 

A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia complements the Triangle of Care Carers included: A Guide to best Practice for Dementia Care. This document describes how meaningful involvement and inclusion of carers can lead to better care for people with dementia, identifying six key standards required to achieve better collaboration and partnership with carers.

Although the terminology and legislation referred to in this toolkit applies to England the standards and rationale are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Further information

Find further information and download the full report A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia (PDF, 962KB).

Download the toolkit PDF iconA Road Less Rocky: Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers, A Guide on how to Support Carers of People with dementia

Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Good Practice

Older Carers Toolkit

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsSpecialist servicesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 13:15
Body: 

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.

It shines a spotlight on particular issues most likely to impact on older carers. This can help inform commissioning to properly and most cost-effectively support them. It will also help commissioners fulfil duties to prevent, reduce and delay needs and to support older carers under the Care Act 2014.

Further information

Download the toolkit PDF iconCaring About Older Carers (PDF 307KB)

Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Toolkit for Young Carers Services

This toolkit provides essential support to enable young carers services in England to significantly increase the identification and support of young carers in schools, and to secure vital new or continuation funding for local school engagement work.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 12:30
Body: 

About the toolkit

Download the whole toolkit here: PDF iconSupporting Young Carers in Schools: A Toolkit for Young Carers Services

This toolkit provides essential tools, templates and guidance for:

  • Services that already work closely with schools – enabling you to strengthen relationships with school staff, respond to the latest changes in the school system, and showcase achievements at an England-wide level. 
  • Services that are developing their local school engagement activities – making the development and delivery of effective local school engagement work easier than ever so that you can maximise impact in your local area. 
  • Services that do not currently have the capacity to engage directly with school staff – making securing funding as easy as possible and enabling you to implement simple, time-minimal actions to signpost schools to England-wide support in the meantime. 

How the toolkit can help

The toolkit explores the role of the Young Carers in Schools programme, an exciting initiative in England and Wales that makes it as easy as possible for schools to identify and support young carers, and awards good practice. It: 

  • Highlights the multiple benefits that Young Carers in Schools can bring to all services, including those with exisitng, successful school engagement programmes. 
  • Sets out the concept of the whole school approach to identifying and support young carers as promoted by Young Cares in Schools, and explains the rationale for this approach as the main aim of local school engagement work. 
  • Offers in-depth targeted advice on how services can secure funding for local school engagement work, engage school staff, maintain momentum and gather and showcase impact data. 
  • Provides a range of tools, templates and pro formas to make using Young Carers in Schools as easy as possible so that you can maximise the identification and support of young carers in you local area.

To download specific tools that accompany this toolkit, please follow the links below: 

  1. Tools to support services to secure funding for local school engagement work.
  2. Tools to support services to rasie the local profile of Young Carers in Schools.
  3. Tools to support services to build and maintain engagement with schools.
  4. Tools to support services to gather impact data from schools.
  5. Tools to support services with limited capacity to signpost schools to Young Carers in Schools.

 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Toolkit for Young Carers Services
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
How-to Guide

Triangle of Care Toolkit - A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

This resource is designed for services implementing the Triangle of Care, it is based on what has worked and what has prevented successful implementation in other organisations. It includes guidance, tips and good practice to guide professionals and carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecialist servicesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carers
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 15:30
Body: 

Introduction

The Triangle of Care was launched in 2010 and was developed by carers who were supporting someone who regularly needed acute inpatient mental health services. It identified six key standards that if in place would mean that the carer would be better involved and supported by mental health services.

Since the launch, Carers Trust has led on the programme in England developing the original guide so that it can be implemented across all mental health services including specialist, forensic, children’s, older people’s and community.

In 2013 the Triangle of Care membership scheme was launched to enable mental health providers to receive formal recognition of their commitment to cultural change and carer involvement. Since its launch, 31 NHS trusts have joined the scheme and their experience, knowledge, good practice and pitfalls have been identified to help develop a toolkit for implementation of the Triangle of Care.

You can download the full toolkit here, or review the appropriate section online: PDF iconTriangle of Care Toolkit

The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

The experiences of the 31 trusts who have joined the Triangle of Care membership scheme between 2013 and April 2015 have been extensive. Carers Trust has been able to identify good practice where it has been implemented which has ensured a more successful implementation of the Triangle of Care. These experiences have been collated to develop a toolkit. This toolkit aims to support trusts who are at the beginning of their Triangle of Care journey, those who are yet to begin and those who are already well progressed but want to learn from their peers and ensure a legacy of cultural change.

The toolkit focuses on the different elements that trusts should consider when implementing the Triangle of Care across their services and more information on each area can be found in the toolkit:

  • Strategic buy-in and support
  • Commissioning and reporting levers including Care Act 2014
  • Staff promotion and buy-in
  • Carer partners and Service user partners
  • Carer champions
  • What good looks like and celebrating good practice
  • A willingness to be honest and encouraging the value of honesty and frequently asked questions

These elements have been identified as important to successful implementation if they are in place. While not all the elements are in place in all trusts many trusts do have a majority in place and this has helped their journey be more successful.

Downloads: 
PDF icon The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Guidance

Triangle of Care for Dementia

The Triangle of Care for Dementia was developed in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing and in consultation with carers, people with dementia and professionals. It is based on the original Triangle of Care and is aimed at acute care hospitals.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care

In 2013 Carers Trust worked with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) to adapt the Triangle of Care to meet the needs of carers of people with dementia when the person they cared for was adapted to a general hospital. A stakeholder day was held where carers, people with dementia and professionals were consulted and provided feedback on the Triangle of Care. 

Carers Trust and the RCN worked together in 2016 to update the guide.

The new guide and self assessment tool were launched in November 2016, this is specifically aimed at acute hospital wards and services where a person with dementia may be admitted but their dementia is not the reason for their admission.

The guide is to enable professionals to look at how they can identify and support carers ensuring that the person with dementia is included and receives the best care outcomes as well as positive outcomes for the carer.

PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice in Dementia Care.pdf

FileTriangle of Care for Dementia Self-Assessment Tool (Word Version)

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland

To reflect the Scottish context, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to suit the Scottish legislation, initiatives and policies around dementia. The Scottish version has been a collaborative effort between Carers Trust Scotland, Royal College of Nursing Scotland, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, University of
Stirling Dementia Services Research and Dementia Carers Voices.

 PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland.pdf.

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care, Wales Edition

In Wales, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to reflect Welsh legislation, good practice examples and policies around dementia in secondary care. The Wales edition has been funded by the Royal Collage of Nursing and adapted for use in Wales by Carers Trust Wales.

 

Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Guidance

Preventing Crisis for Carers - Importance of Monitoring and Evaluation

The Moffat Charitable Trust and Carers Trust Scotland were increasingly aware of the importance of promoting early identification, intervention and support for carers to prevent unnecessary crisis.
Area of Care: 
Secondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitals
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Date Revised: 
Monday, October 27, 2014 - 11:15
Body: 

Preventing Crisis for Carers (Moffat programme) - Role of Glasgow Caledonian University

The Moffat Charitable Trust and Carers Trust Scotland were increasingly aware of the importance of promoting early identification, intervention and support for carers to prevent unnecessary crisis, ensuring carers are properly supported as key partners in the provisionof care and preventing an adverse effect on their health and well-being. 

Importance of Monitoring and Evaluation

The Moffat Programme was designed to achieve this aim by creating effective partnership working between the NHS and social work staff, local carer centres and carers. This study’s intention was to find out what aspects of the programme carers, and those providing services to carers, thought were most helpful and why. 

Shared learning and evidence of the impact of the approach were central to the programme achieving its ambition of making longer term changes to practice and improved outcomes for carers.

Evaluation Team

Glasgow Caledonian University was commissioned to work with the pilot sites during the two years of the Moffat Programme. Dr. Tim Kelly and Dr. David Watson were both members of the School of Health at Glasgow Caledonian University at the time with extensive research experience including working with carers.

Methods

Carers in the each of the pilot areas were asked to PDF iconcomplete a questionnaire looking at their experiences of services provided in both the hospital and community. 

Health and social care staff were asked to complete a questionnaire looking at the service they provide and the training they have undertaken in relation to carers. 

Key stakeholders were asked to take part in an interview or focus group at intervals during the pilot programme. These interviews and focus groups looked at what was being done to achieve the aims of the pilot project across each site.

Results

The results formed the basis of the final evaluation report and the evidence was shared to enable good practice to be rolled out beyond the pilot areas of the programme.  

Read the PDF iconfinal evaluation report, or a PDF iconsummary of the report

Further Developments

For more information on the programme and how it has developed please contact Carers Trust Scotland on scotland@carers.org or phone 0300 123 2008.

Read about the Equal Partners in Care (EPiC) project.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Interview and Focus Group SchedulePDF icon Professional staff information sheet
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Key Info

Preventing Crisis for Carers

Preventing Crisis for Carers was a joint project between Carers Trust Scotland, local carers’ centres, and health and social care professionals.
Area of Care: 
Secondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitals
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:15
Body: 

Preventing Crisis for Carers (The Moffat Project)

With funding from the Moffat Trust, Preventing Crisis for Carers was a joint project between Carers Trust Scotland, local carers’ centres, and health and social care professionals. 

The programme concluded in June 2010 and aimed to: 

  • get support for carers at an early stage
  • advise carers of their rights and offer them a carer’s assessment
  • reduce the pressure on carers’ own health
  • get carers involved in discharge planning
  • train health and social care professionals in carer awareness.

Named after the Moffat Charitable Trust which supplied the funding for the initiative, the project placed carer support workers into hospitals and social work departments. Workers helped identify new carers, directed them to sources of support and trained health care professionals in carer awareness.

What was the Programme about?

The overall programme was made up of four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland. Each pilot site used the knowledge and experience of carer organisations, which were part of The Princess Royal Trust for Carers (now Carers Trust Scotland) Network, and promoted partnership work between the local carers' centres, health and social care professionals to identify carers early on in their caring role. 

The good ways of working and protocols developed by the programme aimed to ensure that all carers who came into contact with health were:

  • identified as carers
  • signposted to local advice
  • made aware of their rights and could access appropriate support to help them with their caring responsibilities.

The Pilot Sites

The four NHS board areas covered by the Moffat pilots were NHS Ayrshire and Arran, NHS Borders, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and NHS Lothian. Local carers' centres led the pilot work in partnership with local health and social care professionals.

What happened?

As a result of the programme almost 3,000 new carers were identified and more than 3,500 health and social care professionals were trained in carer awareness. 

An independent evaluation of the project by Glasgow Caledonian University found that the Crisis Prevention Programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals: 

  • professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage
  • there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers
  • carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer
  • carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received 
  • carers were provided with more information ,such as being told of their right to a carer’s assessment.

The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Read the PDF iconfinal evaluation report, or a PDF iconsummary of the report.  

Some of the people involved in the Moffat Project (health professionals, carers’ centre staff and volunteers) talk about their experiences in an audio podcast.

Further Developments

For more information on developments please contact Carers Trust Scotland on scotland@carers.org or phone 0300 123 2008.

Equal Partners in Care

A further development has been Equal Partners in Care (EPiC).  This is a joint project between NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to implement the workforce education and learning elements of Caring Together 2010-15, the Carers Strategy for Scotland.

It aims to support workers from health, social services and other sectors to work in partnership with carers and young carers, and to achieve better outcomes for all involved in the caring relationship. The aim is to do this by providing learning resources to help best practice become universal practice.

View the Equal Partners in Care website.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Preventing Crisis for Carers - full report
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Guidance

Triangle of Care Membership Scheme

As the number of mental health providers working to embed the Triangle of Care standards in their organisation continues to grow, Carers Trust felt it was important to offer some recognition of this work and developed the Triangle of Care membership scheme.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseDay centreRehab CentreHospitalPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 16:15
Body: 

Triangle of Care Membership Scheme (England only)

As the number of mental health providers working to embed the Triangle of Care standards in their organisation continues to grow, Carers Trust felt it was important to offer some recognition of this work and developed the Triangle of Care membership scheme. A three stage recognition process for services who commit to self-assessing their existing services and action planning to ensure the Triangle of Care standards are achieved. The membership scheme is not a "kitemark" scheme that shows work has ended but is to recognise long term commitment from mental health providers who are working towards cultural change.

Carers Trust has developed a simple membership scheme and application process. 

What does being a member mean?

When a Mental Health Trust joins the Triangle of Care membership scheme, they are basically committing to changing the culture of their organisation to one that is carer inclusive and supportive. They do this by completing self-assessment for all their services in partnership with carers and then work on what needs to change to ensure carers are part of the core business of their Trust.

What do the stars mean?

Trusts who join the membership scheme and complete the appropriate stages for their organisation receive an award to recognise their commitment. For Mental Health Trusts this is up to two stars and for Trusts that are integrated there is a third star. They receive the first for completing stage one (self-assessing all inpatient and crisis teams) and then committing to improve. The second star is for completing self-assessments for all of their community services. This is all mental health, learning disability, older people and dementia and substance misuse services. Trusts who are integrated (provide community physical health services), they receive a third star if they complete self-assessment in all of their physical health services.

The stars do not signify that member trusts are fully carer inclusive. They are awarded when the trust has demonstrated a commitment to becoming more carer inclusive, has shown honesty about where they are now and planned where they need to be to ensure carers are better identified and supported.

The documents you will need to join the membership scheme are:

A number of organisations provide services that the existing Triangle of Care self-assessment would not be suitable for. These services fall into two categories: limited contact services (for example Liaison Psychiatry) and Community Health Services (for example district nursing). As such we have developed some additional guidance to help these services implement the Triangle of Care as well as a "universal" self-assessment tool.

Mental health providers are recommended to use the Triangle of Care Implementation Toolkit to ensure all elements required for successful implementation are in place, you can find full information on the toolkit here: Triangle of Care Toolkit - A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers.

As a requirement of membership, mental health providers must have carer partners who will act as critical friends to the process. Carers Trust has developed guidance to support carers and carer organisations to act as critical friends and the process to be as successful and positive as possible. You can download the Carer Toolkit here: PDF iconTriangle of Care Toolkit for Carers & Carer Organisations

You can download the documents here:

PDF iconTriangle of Care Guidance for Limited Contact Services

PDF iconTriangle of Care Guidance for Community Health Services

Microsoft Office document iconTriangle of Care Self -Assessment Tool for Community Health Services

Mental Health Trusts who have joined the Triangle of Care Membership Scheme (updated March 2018) are:

New members undertaking Stage One:

  • Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust
  • Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust
  • Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • Sussex Partnership NHS Trust
  • West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Members who have completed Stage One and are currently undertaking Stage Two:

  • Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Bradford District Care Foundation Trust
  • Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Devon Partnership NHS Trust
  • Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dudley and Walsall Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust
  • Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
  • Leeds & York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Livewell South West
  • Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • South Staffordshire & Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
  • South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust
  • Tees, Esk and Wear Valley NHS Foundation Trust

Trusts who have completed Stages One and Two:

  • 2gether NHS Foundation Trust
  • Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust
  • Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
  • Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
  • Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust
  • Mersey Care NHS Trust
  • Norfolk & Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust
  • Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
  • Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
  • Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Trusts who completed Stages One, Two and Three:

  • Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust
  • Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust
Share it: 

Pages