Commissioning for Carers Key Principles

Commissioning for Carers Key Principles

Without support, taking on a caring role can mean facing a life of poverty, isolation, ill health and depression. For the person they care for it can mean costly hospital or care admissions if the caring relationship

Key Points: 

  • Carers are the largest providers of care and support in each area of the UK. The economic value of the contribution they make is £119bn per year.
  • Think ‘carer’ in all commissioning and joint strategic needs assessments
  • Commissioning well for carers can reduce admissions to hospital and residential care
Location: 
Date Revised: 
25/11/14

Commissioning for Carers – Key Principles for Clinical Commissioning Groups

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) across England are under enormous pressure to meet financial targets and priority areas for improvements within the NHS.

Commissioning for Carers PDF screenshot

PDF iconcommissioning for carers - key principles for CCGs demonstrates how commissioning for carers can help CCGs deliver desired outcomes and make savings across health and social care.

Commissioning well for carers can:

  • reduce admissions to hospital and residential care
  • reduce costs of delays in transfers of care
  • reduce carers’ need to access primary care as a result of their caring role
  • reduce overall spending on care. 

Largest providers of care

Carers are the largest providers of care and support in each area of the UK. The economic value of the contribution they make is £119bn per year. The moral and financial arguments for supporting carers are clear – without support, taking on a caring role can mean facing a life of poverty, isolation, ill health and depression. For the person they care for it can mean costly hospital or care admissions if the caring relationship breaks down.

Commissioning for Carers

In 2009 Carers Trust produced PDF iconcommissioning for carers jointly with Association of Directors for adult Social Services (ADASS)Carers UKLGA and other national bodies.  

This step by step guide aims to assist commissioners in health and social care in supporting carers through the commissioning cycle.  Accompanying the main guide is a shorter PDF iconaction guide for decision makers.

Key Recommendations in the guides include: 

  • think ‘carer’ in all commissioning and joint strategic needs assessments
  • improve outcomes, independence and choices for both carers and those they care for
  • involve carers of all groups and communities in decision – making and planning process
  • strengthen the carers support provider market, using of funding approaches. 
Commissioning for Carers was produced prior to the restructure to the NHS in 2013. Therefore it refers to old bodies and commissioning structures that no longer exist. However the key principles and learnings are transferable.  

Tools to support commissioners identify needs and develop services for carers

The Carers’ Hub is a resource for all those looking to identify needs, and commission and develop services for carers. 

The results of the Carers’ Hub consultation process can help to inform Joint Strategic Needs Assessments, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and other audit and planning processes, and maximise resources through the development of more efficient services and partnerships. It can also help monitor local progress on strategy implementation.