Commissioning for carers

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Toolkit

Young Carers In Schools - A Toolkit for Local Authorities

Legislation into Practice: Making the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014 a Reality for Young Carers
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Information and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:45
Body: 

A resource for local  authorities working with schools to identify and support young carers. 

This resource supports the case for the effective and economic ways that local young carers services offer both preventative and responsive support for young carers and their families. 

It sets out the case to include the Young Carers in Schools Programme in all aspects of educational support and how this would support local authorities to ensure they fulfil their statutory duties as set out in the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014. 

Most importantly it will ensure positive outcomes for young carers and their families. 

PDF iconLegislation into practice toolkit pdf

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PDF icon Legislation into Practice
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Guidance

Flu Vaccinations for Carers campaign - useful resources

NHS Employers and Carers Trust produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014 which healthcare staff can download .
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:15
Body: 

Help reach carers across the whole community

NHS Employers and Carers Trust  produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014. Carers Trust also produced a set of resources aimed to be used by a wide range of organisations to as well as individuals to encourage flu vaccination uptake among carers. The resources also encourage carers to get in touch with Carers Trust for details of their local carer service. 

The Word versions of each resource were designed to be customised to include your organisation’s own logo.

Further details

For more information about the Flu Vaccination Campaign for Carers, please email Carers Trust.

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Good Practice

Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event

Carers Trust hosted the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event in November 2014. The event brought together over 100 professionals from across the sector who work to identify and support carers across primary care.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carers
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

Carers Trust hosted the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event in November 2014. This annual event was funded by the Department of Health as part of the wider Supporting Carers in Primary Care programme. 

The large scale event brought together over 100 professionals from across the sector who work to identify and support carers across primary care. 

The day provided an excellent opportunity for sharing information and good practice and the additional networking hour at the end of the day provided the ideal opportunity for delegates to reflect on what they had learnt together. The  evaluation feedback demonstrates that delegates found the day both informative and useful.

The programme

Rick Bolton, who cares for his four-year-old son led the day, sharing his account of what being a carer means to him. Delegates heard from a variety of expert speakers including Wendy Nicholson, Professional Office for School and Community Nursing at the Department of Health, Jen Kenwood, Head of Patient Experience – Community, Primary and Integrated Care at NHS England and Moira Fraser, former Interim CEO and Director of Policy at Carers Trust, as well as taking part in a selection of workshops. 

View the presentations

The event presentations will be useful for staff from carers services and other organisations who support carers in primary care.  You can also preview what was covered in the workshops. 

Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event – view the presentations

 

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Good Practice

Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event – presentations

View the presentations from the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event that Carers Trust hosted in November 2014.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carers
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

These presentations will be useful for  staff from carers services and other organisations who support carers in primary care.  You can also preview what was covered in the workshops. 

Morning plenary presentations 

Policymaking to primary care practice making it happen at the sharp end (Moira Fraser, former Interim CEO and Head of Policy, Carers Trust)

Moira Fraser explained that much needs to be done to turn the rhetoric into reality and overcome the barriers facing carers organisations working with the NHS to identify carers. 

Cosying up: how CCGs can partner carers (Dr Michael Taylor, Lead GP for Carers Services at Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale CCG)

Find out which strategies Dr Michael Taylor recommends to improve support for carers by working in partnership with CCGs.

RCGPs supporting carers in general practice programme (Dr Nazia Mohammed, Clinical Champion for Carers, RCGP)

Dr Nazia Mohammed provided an overview of the College’s work to improve carer identification and support in general practice.

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Morning workshops 

Delegates were able to choose between the following morning workshops:  

How to network effectively across the health economy to maximise support for carers (Michelle Pilling Lay, Advisor Quality & Patient Experience, East Lancashire CCG)

An overview of the current landscape in health and the opportunities to maximise the impact of the Primary Care Identification Worker.

GP audits and GP investors in carers standard accreditation (Louise Shaw, Primary Care Lead & Carer Assessment Support worker and Hazel Wright, Adult Services Manager, Northampton Carers)  

Outlines the successes and challenges of co-produced primary care Interface work over five years with specific focus on the implementation of annual audits and the launch of Northamptonshire Investors in Carers Standard accreditation.   

Developing and maintaining a carers links network in Salford (Julia Ellis, former Development Manager for Primary Care and Outreach, Carers Trust)

Provides an overview of the successful and well-established Carers Links Network in Salford. Learn how the service that provides 300 referrals per annum from the primary care sector was established, developed and maintained.

Effective monitoring and evaluation tools to assess the impact of emotional support services for carers (Clare Edwards, Carer Health Worker, West Cumbria Carers)

Explores how to effectively assess the impact of services in supporting carers’ mental wellbeing using questionnaires developed by NICE.  

We also held a workshop on young carers which was  led by Rick Bolton, Dr Nazia Mohammed and Daniel Phelps. It was agreed we all need to work together to generate a culture of change and focus on developing good long term relationships to encourage lengthy engagement. Solutions discussed included:

  • A whole family approach - ensuring young carers are identified when parents present with chronic illness for example.
  • GP awareness training - the same read code would be used for young carers as adult carers.
  • Remembering that primary care is much wider than GP surgeries.
  • NHS employees’ awareness training.
  • Continued identification through schools / colleges.
  • Identifying young carers early through health visitors and children’s centres.
  • Importance of relationships such as a long-term relationship between pharmacy staff and families.
  • Professionals having the awareness of young carers and the confidence to ask appropriate questions.
  • Important to find champions with passion to drive work forward in own establishments.

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Afternoon plenary presentations

Community pharmacy - how can it help support carers (Alastair Buxton, Head of NHS Services at PSNC) 

Describes the community pharmacy services which can support carers and the Carers Trust / Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee pilot to test carer identification in community pharmacies in England.

Supporting the health and wellbeing of carers (Wendy Nicholson, Professional Officer for School and Community Nursing at the Department of Health)

Demonstrates that community nurses are keen to extend their understanding of carers’ needs and to ensure carers’ wellbeing needs are met.

Further guidance on supporting adult carers through community nursing can be found on the Supporting adult carers through community nursing page.

NHS England commitment to carers - can it make a difference (Jen Kenwood, Head of Patient Experience – Community, Primary and Integrated Care, NHS England)

Described NHS England’s commitment to carers, which comprises 37 commitments spread across eight key priorities, from raising the profile of carers to person-centred coordinated care. 

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Afternoon workshops

Delegates were able to choose between the following afternoon workshops:

The carers health team: a methodology to prevent carers falling between the gaps in our systems (Geoff Coleman, Chief Executive, Crossroads Care South Central)

Explored using a collaborative approach to support carers involving a partnership between Crossroads Care, Carers Health Team (NHS) and Carers Support West Sussex.

Carer awareness training for pharmacies (Anne Cole, Regional Manager South West, CPPE)

A guide to the new carer-awareness training resources for pharmacy teams co-produced by the Centre For Pharmacy Postgraduate Education (CPPE) and Carers Trust to improve the identification and referral of carers and how this fits into the Carer Friendly Pharmacy Pilot.

Supporting carers through integrated care (Helen Brown, Health Development Lead Carers Resource, Harrogate) 

Evidences the value of providing support for carers by establishing a service for carers within Integrated Care Teams. It highlights the success of the service in identifying and reaching out to ‘hidden’ carers and the benefits to all the multi-disciplinary professionals involved.

Supporting carers through e-learning for community nurses (Jennie Whitford – Carers Project Manager, QNI) 

Explores the digital Carers Resource for community nurses which has been developed by The Queen's Nursing Institute in collaboration with nurses working in the community.

 

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Research

A survey of the experiences and needs of male carers

Husband, Partner, Dad, Son, Carer? is the report of a survey of the experiences and needs of male carers, carried out by Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum at the start of 2014.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSecondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingCarer awarenessCarers in employment
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 10:15
Body: 

Caring is often seen as a ‘female’ issue but it is something that affects a large number of men too. The 2011 Census found that in England and Wales more than four in ten carers are male (42.3%) - amounting to 2.44 million men providing care, unpaid, for a friend or family member who due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction.

Despite their vast number, there has been little research to understand the experiences of these men or the vital role that they play in their families.

Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum sought to learn more about men’s experiences of caring, the impact it has on their lives and the support services they feel would be helpful to them. A total of 609 male carers from across the UK took part in a survey which included 119 fathers, all of whom were caring for a child or children with a disability, long term conditions or mental health or addiction issue. PDF iconDads care too: A survey of the experiences of fathers who are carers showcases the experiences of these dads.

Key findings

  • 119 dads responded, of all ages.
  • The highest proportion (72%) care for a son or daughter with a learning disability or autism.
  •  Nearly 20% had been caring for 21 years or more.
  • 35% cared alongside being in employment. 40% of those spent 60 or more hours caring per week.
  • A third of dads reported that they never get a break.
  • 46% said caring had a negative impact on their mental health, and 43% said it had a negative impact on their physical health.
  • Almost three quarters said they missed out on spending time with friends and family members as a result of being a carer.
  • The most common support wanted but not received was breaks from their caring role.
  • 55% said they felt the needs of male carers were different from female carers.
  • Many felt their role as a carer was not recognised, or that services were not designed in a way which met their needs.

Further information

Download Dads Care too.

Read the reportPDF iconHusband, Partner, Dad, Son, Carer: A Survey of the Experiences and Needs of Male Carers

Exexutive Summary (PDF iconEnglish language version(PDF, 1,728KB).

Executive Summary (PDF iconWelsh_language version(PDF, 728KB).

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Research

A Road Less Rocky Supporting Carers of People with Dementia

A Road Less Rocky is a report from Carers Trust that found that carers of people with dementia are not getting the support and advice they often desperately need.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 14:00
Body: 

The report found that there were a number of critical points along a carer’s journey where they would most value information and support. These critical points include:

  1. When dementia is diagnosed.
  2. When the carer takes on an 'active' caring role.
  3. When the capacity of the person with dementia declines.
  4. When the carer needs emotional support and/or a break from caring.
  5. When the person with dementia loses their mobility.
  6. When the person with dementia has other health problems.
  7. When the carer has to cope with behavioural problems.
  8. When the carer's own circumstances change.
  9. When the person with dementia becomes incontinent.
  10. When decisions about residential care and end of life care have to be made

We have designed a toolkit around these ten points,the issues carers face at these points and what will make a positive difference. It has been produced to sit alongside A Road Less Rocky and gives guidance to professionals who come in contact with carers. The toolkit is useful for anyone who works with or treats patients with dementia and is therefore likely to come into contact with carers. 

A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia complements the Triangle of Care Carers included: A Guide to best Practice for Dementia Care. This document describes how meaningful involvement and inclusion of carers can lead to better care for people with dementia, identifying six key standards required to achieve better collaboration and partnership with carers.

Although the terminology and legislation referred to in this toolkit applies to England the standards and rationale are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Further information

Find further information and download the full report A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia (PDF, 962KB).

Download the toolkit PDF iconA Road Less Rocky: Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers, A Guide on how to Support Carers of People with dementia

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Educational

About Time Grant Evaluations

Following the successful delivery of two About Time Grant programmes, Time for Change and Take Action and Support which addressed issues that can lead to young adult carers becoming disengaged from society, independent evaluations of the two programmes have been produced.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illness
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Primary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, February 12, 2018 - 10:00
Body: 

Key points: 

The objectives of the evaluations were to:
  • Provide an overall evaluation of all data to assess the progress of funded projects against the aims and objectives of the About Time grant programmes and of the wider About Time programme.
  • Conduct a qualitative study with funded projects to identify effective strategies and approaches for supporting and enabling young adult carers.
  • Provide a focused evaluation of data derived from outcomes measurement tools designed to measure the extent of care undertaken, the positive and negative impacts of caring for young adult carers and changes in their lives because of taking part in the funded intervention.
  • Evaluate the impacts of programme delivery and Carers Trust grant making processes on funded organisations.

About Time evaluations

The evaluations of the Time for Change and Take Action and Support grant programmes were structured in three phases and each had its own evaluation report with an overview of the whole programme also produced.

Phase one: February–October 2015

 

Phase two: November 2015–November 2016

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015 to November 2016 Executive Summary PDF (177 KB)

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015  to November 2016 PDF (323 KB)

Phase three: December 2016–October 2017

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 Executive Summary PDF (251 KB)

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 PDF (483 KB)

Overview Report

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Overview Report PDF (519 KB)

Key achievements and learning from the programmes include:

  • Around 7,200 young adult carers have benefited from 114 projects delivered by Carers Trust Network Partners, exceeding the original target of 6,200 young adult carers.
  • Programmes provided support to significant numbers of young adult carers for the first time, with over half of the young people participating being new to Carers Trust Network Partners.
  • Programmes developed a flexible response to the needs of young adult carers, including individual support, group activities and access to small grants for individuals, alongside the development of partnerships.
  • The programme design involved young adult carers and Network Partners, ensuring programmes reflected specific needs across UK.
  • Projects have been successful in reaching a representative group of young adult carers and there was a good geographic spread of projects across the UK.
  • Carers Trust has enabled Network Partners to deliver effective projects by being flexible about delivery approaches and providing good quality support, information and training.
  • The Carers Trust Network has a unique role in supporting the needs of young adult carers.
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How-to Guide

Triangle of Care Toolkit - A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

This resource is designed for services implementing the Triangle of Care, it is based on what has worked and what has prevented successful implementation in other organisations. It includes guidance, tips and good practice to guide professionals and carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecialist servicesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carers
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 15:30
Body: 

Introduction

The Triangle of Care was launched in 2010 and was developed by carers who were supporting someone who regularly needed acute inpatient mental health services. It identified six key standards that if in place would mean that the carer would be better involved and supported by mental health services.

Since the launch, Carers Trust has led on the programme in England developing the original guide so that it can be implemented across all mental health services including specialist, forensic, children’s, older people’s and community.

In 2013 the Triangle of Care membership scheme was launched to enable mental health providers to receive formal recognition of their commitment to cultural change and carer involvement. Since its launch, 31 NHS trusts have joined the scheme and their experience, knowledge, good practice and pitfalls have been identified to help develop a toolkit for implementation of the Triangle of Care.

You can download the full toolkit here, or review the appropriate section online: PDF iconTriangle of Care Toolkit

The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

The experiences of the 31 trusts who have joined the Triangle of Care membership scheme between 2013 and April 2015 have been extensive. Carers Trust has been able to identify good practice where it has been implemented which has ensured a more successful implementation of the Triangle of Care. These experiences have been collated to develop a toolkit. This toolkit aims to support trusts who are at the beginning of their Triangle of Care journey, those who are yet to begin and those who are already well progressed but want to learn from their peers and ensure a legacy of cultural change.

The toolkit focuses on the different elements that trusts should consider when implementing the Triangle of Care across their services and more information on each area can be found in the toolkit:

  • Strategic buy-in and support
  • Commissioning and reporting levers including Care Act 2014
  • Staff promotion and buy-in
  • Carer partners and Service user partners
  • Carer champions
  • What good looks like and celebrating good practice
  • A willingness to be honest and encouraging the value of honesty and frequently asked questions

These elements have been identified as important to successful implementation if they are in place. While not all the elements are in place in all trusts many trusts do have a majority in place and this has helped their journey be more successful.

Downloads: 
PDF icon The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers
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Guidance

Triangle of Care for Dementia

The Triangle of Care for Dementia was developed in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing and in consultation with carers, people with dementia and professionals. It is based on the original Triangle of Care and is aimed at acute care hospitals.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care

In 2013 Carers Trust worked with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) to adapt the Triangle of Care to meet the needs of carers of people with dementia when the person they cared for was adapted to a general hospital. A stakeholder day was held where carers, people with dementia and professionals were consulted and provided feedback on the Triangle of Care. 

Carers Trust and the RCN worked together in 2016 to update the guide.

The new guide and self assessment tool were launched in November 2016, this is specifically aimed at acute hospital wards and services where a person with dementia may be admitted but their dementia is not the reason for their admission.

The guide is to enable professionals to look at how they can identify and support carers ensuring that the person with dementia is included and receives the best care outcomes as well as positive outcomes for the carer.

PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice in Dementia Care.pdf

FileTriangle of Care for Dementia Self-Assessment Tool (Word Version)

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland

To reflect the Scottish context, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to suit the Scottish legislation, initiatives and policies around dementia. The Scottish version has been a collaborative effort between Carers Trust Scotland, Royal College of Nursing Scotland, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, University of
Stirling Dementia Services Research and Dementia Carers Voices.

 PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland.pdf.

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care, Wales Edition

In Wales, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to reflect Welsh legislation, good practice examples and policies around dementia in secondary care. The Wales edition has been funded by the Royal College of Nursing and adapted for use in Wales by Carers Trust Wales.

 

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Guidance

Policy and legislation in Scotland

The law relating to carers differs across the UK. The Scottish Parliament has responsibility for health, the NHS and social care, so most of the legislation which affects carers in Scotland is discussed in the Scottish Parliament.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careCommissioning
Caring for: 
Adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 11:15
Body: 

The law for carers in Scotland

The law relating to carers differs across the UK. The Scottish Parliament has responsibility for health, the NHS and social care, so most of the legislation which affects carers in Scotland is discussed in the Scottish Parliament. The Equality Act 2010, laws around flexible working for carers, and legislation relating to benefits for carers is UK-wide and so is also applicable to carers in Scotland.

There is also a piece of legislation for carers introduced in early 2015. The Carers (Scotland) Bill will consolidate existing rights from other pieces of legislation as well as enshrining new rights for carers in law. Like all Scottish legislation it will go through a three-stage process, allowing for debate and discussion in committees, evidence to be gathered and amendments to be made. This allows opportunities for the Bill to be further strengthened and we will be working closely with the Scottish Government, MSPs and other decision-makers, carers and Network Partners to make sure the Bill can make a real difference for carers and carers’ services.

Key legislation

A strategy for carers

Scotland has a Carers’ Strategy. Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010-2015 is a framework for policy and legislation development in Scotland and has driven the development of a range of projects and initiatives that aim to improve the lives of Scotland’s carers, ensure that organisations and services are able to support carers and recognise them as equal partners in care, and support carers to have a life outside of caring and to care with confidence. 

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Carers Rights Charter

As set out in the Carers’ Strategy, Carers Scotland and the Minority Ethnic Carers Project (MECOPP) have been commissioned by the Scottish Government to develop a Carers Rights Charter. Consultation on the Charter took place in 2013 with carers and carers’ organisations, and the final Charter of Rights will be launched in conjunction with the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities in 2014.

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Self-directed support

Legislation on Self-directed support (SDS) was passed in 2012. The Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 ensures that all individuals and families who receive social care support (including carers) have choice and control over how this support is delivered, by being offered different options on how they take the support.

Carers can help the person they look after to manage these support options, or if carers are receiving a support service in their own right, they are also entitled to options when getting support.

Carers Trust Scotland has produced a guide for carers on SDS. The Scottish Government’s SDS website also gives more detailed information on SDS options, how SDS works in practice, and examples and case studies of SDS users. 

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Integration of health and social care

The Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act came into force in 2014 and legislates for health boards and local authorities to integrate budgets and services and to ensure that health and social care provision across Scotland is joined-up and seamless, especially for people with long term conditions and disabilities and their carers.

The legislation and the regulations and guidance that accompany it support the arrangements for integrating health and social care, in order to improve outcomes for patients, service users, carers and their families. This will enable health boards and local authorities to work together effectively to deliver quality, sustainable care services.

Carers and service users are supported to be involved and make decisions about services in their areas, with consultation required when integration schemes are being developed, when strategic plans are being developed and reviewed, and at any other time when a decision might significantly affect the provision of services in an area. 

Since the consultation stage of the Act, we have been calling for carers and service users to be involved in a supported and meaningful way so that their participation is as valuable as possible.

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A Carers’ Bill for Scotland

In October 2013, at the second Carers’ Parliament, Alex Salmond announced the Scottish Government’s intention to legislate for carers before the Scottish General Election in 2016.

A consultation on the proposals for a Carers’ Bill ran from January 2014 to April 2014 and examined the possibilities to introduce further duties for statutory bodies, and new rights and entitlements for unpaid carers.

All aspects of the carer journey were consulted on, from identification and assessment through to service provision, carer involvement and service review. Young carers were also explicitly included in these legislative proposals.

The Carers (Scotland) Bill was launched on 9 March 2015 and will consolidate existing rights from other pieces of legislation as well as enshrining new rights for carers in law. Like all Scottish legislation it will go through a three-stage process, allowing for debate and discussion in committees, evidence to be gathered and amendments to be made. This allows opportunities for the Bill to be further strengthened and we will be working closely with the Scottish Government, MSPs and other decision-makers, carers and Network Partners to make sure the Bill can make a real difference for carers and carers’ services.

The Bill sets out a range of measures to improve identification and support to carers, including the introduction of a new duty on local authorities to support carers who meet certain eligibility criteria.. This is a big change from the current system where local authorities have a power to support carers if they choose to.

Carers Trust Scotland has produced a PDF iconbriefing on the Carers (Scotland) Bill, and a summary specifically looking at its PDF iconprovisions for young carers.

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Charging

Regulations that are part of the Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 prevent carers from being charged for social care services that they have been assessed as needing to be provided to them in order to support them to provide care. This includes (but is not limited to)

  • the provision of information and advice
  • advocacy for carers and young carers
  • emotional support and counselling
  • training for carers and young carers
  • support with housework or gardening or other similar activity
  • cost of taxi fares and driving lessons in special circumstances
  • short breaks
  • translation and interpretation services.

Carers assessment

Most services are provided following the identification of need through a Carer’s Assessment. If the carer is not eligible for a Carer’s Assessment, because he or she does not carry out a substantial amount of care on a regular basis, then local authorities have the discretion to provide support to the carer without an assessment having been carried out. Charges should also be waived in this situation. 

There are some limitations to waiving of charges around short breaks, driving lessons and taxi fares, and household tasks. The briefing below goes into greater detail about these limitations and the impact on carers who are receiving these kinds of services and support.

This right of carers not to be charged for support applies to services provided to both adult carers and to young carers for services provided under the Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 and under S22 of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

Carers Trust Scotland, along with the other national carer organisations, has produced an easy-read briefing about PDF iconwaiving of charges for carers who are receiving self-directed support.

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PDF icon Waiving of charges for carers - summaryPDF icon Carers (Scotland) Bill - briefing
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