Education

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Toolkit

Young Carers In Schools - A Toolkit for Local Authorities

Legislation into Practice: Making the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014 a Reality for Young Carers
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Information and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:45
Body: 

A resource for local  authorities working with schools to identify and support young carers. 

This resource supports the case for the effective and economic ways that local young carers services offer both preventative and responsive support for young carers and their families. 

It sets out the case to include the Young Carers in Schools Programme in all aspects of educational support and how this would support local authorities to ensure they fulfil their statutory duties as set out in the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014. 

Most importantly it will ensure positive outcomes for young carers and their families. 

PDF iconLegislation into practice toolkit pdf

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Toolkit

Training resources to help with improving the identification and support of young carers

These resources are designed to support the training of a wide range of professionals and volunteers to identify and support young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 13:00
Body: 
The Department of Health and Social Care funded Carers Trust to develop these training resources, which support a wide variety of professionals, including volunteers, from:
  • Education, health and social care statutory sectors. 
  • Children and young people’s services including youth workers.
  • Young carer services. 
  • Voluntary and community sector organisations. 
  • Faith organisations. 
 
The resources will help professionals to understand young carers, and how an offer of support can be made to them and their families, to reduce excessive or inappropriate caring. 
 
The training covers:
 
  • Defining who young carers are and the challenges they face. 
  • Different types of young carer roles. 
  • Nature of tasks that young carers carry out. 

FileModule 1 - Handout 1 Sample Agenda
PDF iconModule 1 - Handout 2 - What kinds of caring do young carers do
PDF iconModule 1 - Handout 3 What is the impact of caring on young carers

  • Understanding the extent of young carer involvement: nationally and by area.
  • How you may be able to identify who is a young carer.
  • Understanding young carer issues, and potential barriers to their achievement.
  • Different models for identifying young carers.
  • Barriers to young carers seeking support.
 
  • Guidance and advice on how to approach an initial conversation with a child, or parent, in an appropriate and sensitive way.
  • Guidance and advice on who else to involve when, and how to involve them in a sensitive manner that is appropriate for the child and their families. 
  • Recognising appropriate safeguarding issues in relation to young carers and guidance on how to address these.
  • Understanding of confidentiality issues. 
 
Module 4 
  • Guidance and advice on key local stakeholders to involve. 
  • Where to find local support and services to signpost young carers.
Module 5
  • Resource library of tools and templates.
Module 6
  • Securing commitment from participants to take action.

Other materials: 

The training can be delivered in one day, or in modules, for example over a series of team meetings.
 
Carers Trust worked with four Carers Trust Network Partners to develop and deliver these resources in face-to-face training in spring and early summer 2018 to over 220 people:
 
 
We will also deliver a webinar.
 
Please email our Policy team with any feedback about the materials and let us know how you have used them. 
 
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Good Practice

Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed In Further Education in Wales

A Wales-specific, user-friendly resource, this toolkit was developed in partnership with Learning and Work Institute to increase awareness of student carers and their specific needs, promote existing good practice from colleges and carers services and offering expert recommendations.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 10:45
Body: 

Student Carers in Further Education

In 2015 Carers Trust worked with the National Institute for Adults Continuing Education (NIACE) to develop a practical resource for colleges. In 2017 Carers Trust Wales and Learning and Work Institute worked together to develop Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed in Further Education in Wales, drawing on good practice from colleges and carers centres across Wales. 

This interactive resource has been designed to generate momentum for identifying and supporting student carers within colleges. We hope that it will inspire and assist all colleges to build on good practice to develop their own approaches to identifying and supporting this student group. In doing so, this will ensure that students who are caring for others - students whom, in many instances, will have overcome very difficult circumstances and have aquired valuable transferable skills along the way - are able to reach their potential and successfully achieve their educational aims. 

Feedback

Carers Trust Wales will be contacting colleges across Wales in September 2018 for feedback on the implementation on the toolkit.

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PDF icon Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Good Practice GuidePDF icon Cefnogi Myfyrwyr a chanddynt Gyfrifoldebau Gofal: Canllaw Arfer Da
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Research

Full of Care Report - Young Carers in Wales 2009

In 2009 the Children's Commissioner at the time, Keith Towler, launched new research and recommendations for Young Carers Services in Wales.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary careHealth and wellbeingCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 10:15
Body: 

The report, entitled Full of Care, aimed to show the barriers young carers face achieving the rights laid out by the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child, such as the right to education, to relax and play and to have their views respected. 

The document included the research project All Right Gov' that Powys Carers Service carried out in Summer 2008, travelling all over Wales to meet other young carers projects and listening to their experiences.

The report made a number of recommendations to both Welsh Government and local service boards as well as local authorities, health and The Department of Children, Education Lifelong Learning and Skills.

Early identification and intervention

The fact that 54% of young carers in this survey felt that they only got support in a crisis underlines the importance of early identification and intervention. However, the young carers who took part in this survey were those who had been identified and were receiving support. 

Much of the existing guidance is intended to prevent crises arising through early identification and intervention. It is clear though that there is often a considerable gap between national policy and local practice.

The message ‘Too little, too late’ still resonates today.

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Research

Time to be Heard Event: Nottingham University 2014 Evaluation Report

An evaluation of the Carers Trust Time to be Heard campaign event that took place in Nottingham in 2014 for young adult carers.
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

As part of the Time to be Heard campaign, Carers Trust organised an event for 200 young adult carers (aged 16-25) and their support workers to get their voices heard by the decision makers who could reduce barriers to further and higher education.

Some key themes emerged:

  • Young adult carers need tailored information.
  • Young adult carers are concerned about disclosing their caring status.
  • Young adult carers are worried about going to university.
  • Young adult carers face distinct barriers to accessing further education.

The event also provided information and dispelled myths about access to college and university.

Read the evaluation of the event

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Educational

Universities supporting students with caring responsibilities

View details of Universities in the UK who have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

This is a list of Universities in the UK that have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities. If you would like to contribute what your university does for students with caring responsibilities to this list, contact Carers Trust

Please note, this does not claim to be a comprehensive list of universities who have implemented specific support for carers. Furthermore, Carers Trust has not checked or vetted the support promoted here by universities.

Initiatives supporting young adult carers at universities

The University of Birmingham 

Young Adult Carers Event:  2 April 2015 

This event, hosted by the University of Birmingham, was designed for young adult carers to discover and learn about university and student life. 

University lead contact for student carers: Jane Patel - call 0121 414 8489. 

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The University of Nottingham

Outreach and taster days for young adult carers

The University of Nottingham hosts outreach and taster day activities for young adult carer groups from around the Midlands. 

Student Support for those with caring responsibilities 

The Student Support Team at the University of Nottingham has a dedicated contact for students with caring responsibilities, Carole East. Students are welcome to contact Carole directly, her contact details are: carole.east@nottingham.ac.uk or 0115 9514471.

University lead contact for student carers: Emma Szembek - call 0115 8466468 or Daisy Throup - call 0115 8467336.  

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The University of Winchester

Specific outreach to young carers and young adult carers

  • The University of Winchester runs an annual residential for young adult carers aged 14+ living in the county of Hampshire.
  • The University hosts taster days for young adult carers aged 14+.
  • The University engages in partnership work with young carers projects around Hampshire as part of its widening participation work and to support young carers with life skills and career choices.
  • The University recruits young adult carer students as Higher Education Ambassadors for the University. 
  • Visit the University young carers page.

Multi-agency partnership working for young carers and young adult carers

The University of Winchester contributes annually to the Young Carers Festival organised by The Children’s Society. 

Visit the University young adults carers page.  

Compact Scheme

The University of Winchester specifically includes in its Compact Scheme, with local colleges and sixth forms, students ‘who have caring responsibilities’ or who have ‘a disrupted pattern of education’ or who have ‘problems relating to health, disability or bereavement’, among other criteria.

Postgraduate financial support for young adult carers

The University of Winchester of Winchester has a Postgraduate Access Scholarship Scheme (PASS). The scholarship provides a 20% discount on tuition fees for a number of groups including a “carer for a family member with long-term ill-health or disability”.

University lead contact for student carers: Dr Terri Sandison - call 01962 827225 or Joanne Gale-Chambers - call 01962 624890.

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York St John University

Partnership work with York Carers Centre

York St John University works closely with York Carers Centre to support young adult carers. This includes a York Carers Centre stall at Fresher’s Fair and information stalls throughout the year.

University lead contact for student carers: Anna Herbert - call 01904 876408 or Vanesa Emslie - call 01904 876970.#

De Montford University (DMU)

DMU recognises that students with caring responsibilities may have additional support needs. It has set up a webpage of useful information and contacts for student carers and encourage any student with a caring role to contact one of the designated staff for student carers.   

University lead contacts for student carers:

  • Melissa Page, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7872
  • Ryan Ward, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7605
  • Email: transitions@dmu.ac.uk

 
DMU organises university experience days for student carers which involves taster sessions, campus and accommodation tours and meeting current students.
 
The university is part of local networks including those run by Leicester City Council and Barnardos. It also has five UNITE Foundation Scholarships which offer free accommodation in a Unite hall of residence for three years. Student carers are a priority group for this award.  
 
For further information please contact Melissa Page.

Sheffield Hallam University

Information about support for student carers at the university is available on its website.

Pre-entry support

The Compact scheme provides extra support to students who face barriers to progressing to university due to having caring responsibilities (amongst other circumstances). Contact the Compact team on 0114 225 4231 or email.

On course support for student carers

University lead contacts for student carers – Robin Kerr and Lynette Granger, call 0114 225 3813 or email.

  • Ring round of new student carers to check how students are settling in, resolve any issues and refer to appropriate support services. Targeted emails are also sent to raise awareness of relevant opportunities and support services.
  • Information and advice pages for student carers – dedicated pages for student carers are included on the Student Advice and Information blog. Robin and Lynette also post articles on the blog about their work with student carers.
  • One-to-one advice for student carers – Robin and Lynette are happy to see any student on a one-to-one basis to discuss their caring role, give information and advice about university life and provide supported referrals to local carer organisations
  • Partnership work with local carers’ organisations – Robin and Lynette have made close links with local carer organisations to help support student carers.
  • Staff from Sheffield Carers Centre and Sheffield Young Carers’Project have also delivered training to staff in student facing roles across the university.

Financial support for students with caring responsibilities

Students with caring responsibilities who may need extra financial support because they have higher than expected costs or they have a sudden financial emergency are eligible to make an application to the Sheffield Hallam Student Support Fund. Further information is available from Student Funding and Access Support on 0114 225 3813 or via email

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University of Manchester

For more information visit the University of Manchester student carers webpage or contact Jessica Nightingale on 0161 275 2987.

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Educational

Student Carers in Higher Education

This resource will enable universities and services supporting young adult carers to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to access and succeed in higher education.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 16:15
Body: 

For a young person who has caring responsibilities, trying to transition to, through and beyond university can be extremely challenging and for some a barrier.

Carers Trust, with the support of The National Union of Students and the National Network of Universities Supporting Young Adult Carers, has published a new guide:

This resource will enable universities and services supporting young adult carers, to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to access and succeed in higher education.

The resource: 

  • Draws together some of the good practice universities have already begun to develop.
  • Makes recommendations for how universities can support students across the student life cycle.
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Educational

Student Carers in Further Education

Carers Trust in partnership with NIACE has published a new guide to support students with caring responsibilities in further education colleges.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

This new resource will enable further education colleges to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to remain and succeed in further education.

PDF iconSupporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Colleges and Services to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed in Further Education

“If I was told that I couldn’t have my phone on I would just leave college – my mum needs to be able to contact me quickly in an emergency.”
Young adult carer (taken from the Top tips for colleges and college staff supporting student carers section of the guide)

Who is the resource for?

This practical resource is designed for use by managers and staff working in further education colleges and carers services supporting young and young adult carers.

The resource: 

  • Increases awareness and understanding of young adult carers and their specific needs.
  • Outlines who young adult carers are, the challenges they face and how their caring roles can impact on their education.
  • Draws together some of the good practice that is already being developed in some colleges.
  • Makes recommendations for how student carers can be supported to sustain their participation in learning, achieve their potential and succeed.
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Good Practice

Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC)

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:30
Body: 

About the Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC) project

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.

Each country involved in the EPYC project will develop a new tool, which we hope will help youth professionals - like teachers, social worker or youth workers - to better support young carers.

The tools aim to aid in the identification of young carers, to allow practitioners to assess the situation of young and young adult carers, including measuring the level and impact of the care burden, and to allow practitioners to develop an action plan to address issues adversely affecting young and young adult carers.

We will then trial the tool to see how it can help make Scotland a better place for young and young adult carers to grow up in.

Why is this project happening?

Young and young adult carers carry out, often on a regular basis, significant caring tasks and assume a level of responsibility which would not usually be associated with their age group.

Although research has provided clear evidence that heavy caring responsibilities can result in emotional difficulties, health problems, social exclusion and limited opportunities for social and leisure activities, professional support services are lacking in many EU countries.

Who is involved in the project?

The two year EU funded project started in August 2016  involving a strategic partnership of six European organisations, namely Carers Trust Scotland (UK), Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V. (Germany), Care Alliance Ireland (Ireland), Anziani e non solo (Italy), ARC ORK (Austria) and IPS Versari Macrelli (Italy).

The kick off meeting, hosted by the leading partner, Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V., was held in Berlin on 12 September 2016.

What can you do now?

Expected EPYC project outcomes

In the course of the project, intermediate expected results include:

  • An increased capacity of organisations to identify young and young adult carers.
  • An increased knowledge of promising or successful experiences and practices from other European countries.
  • An increased awareness of the challenges faced by young and young adult carers in the different local contexts involved directly or indirectly in project activities.

The outcome of the project is the improved expertise in this field and professional stakeholders having the knowledge to develop support services for young and young adult carers and work with relevant sectors to improve support.

If you are interested to know more about the EPYC project  contact:

  • Louise Morgan, Carers Trust Scotland, Young Carers Development Manager Working with the SYCSA. 
  • Paul Traynor, Carers Trust Scotland, Policy and Campaigns Officer (Young and Young Adult Carers). 
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Toolkit

Carers Hub: A commissioners tool for mapping local services in consultation with carers

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 10:45
Body: 

The Carers’ Hub is a model of comprehensive carers support, developed by Carers Trust with assistance from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and funding from the Department of Health. It can be used as a resource for all those looking to commission and develop personalised services for carers.

At the centre of the Hub diagram are the outcomes of the refreshed National Carers Strategy for England. The white band represents a three-pronged approach that can be used to inform strategic planning, and the 17 spokes on the outside of the circle illustrate the complete range of interventions that every area needs in order to deliver the intended outcomes.

Using the Carers' Hub

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision. In order to assess what mixture of interventions might be necessary to achieve the outcomes of the National Carers’ Strategy in a local area, the first step would be to carry out consultation to establish:
  • What services are currently available.
  • Which of the National Carers’ Strategy outcomes are being met.
  • Which groups are being served.
  • What local carers and their families want.
A simple way to do this is by printing large copies of the Hub and asking carers to write comments or attach post-it notes under the interventions that are well provided locally. Then use another copy of the Hub (or different colour post-it notes) to repeat the process asking carers to indicate where there are gaps in services. 
 
You may wish to ask carers to make notes on the post-its about the quality of services and who is providing them. As a separate exercise, you may wish to ask carers to repeat the process indicating how well each of the five outcomes at the centre of the Hub are being met. Involving professionals and local service providers in the process will help to give you a complete picture of services in your area.

Local strategic planning

The Hub's three-pronged approach to local strategic planning - in the white middle band of the Hub: carer-led, identify and include and whole-area - can then be applied in order to inform the development and implementation of the most appropriate mix of interventions. 
 
Ideally, carer representatives and professionals should sit down together to analyse the messages and identify priorities, so it may be best to carry out this process at meetings (for example, of carer strategy groups or multi-disciplinary agency groups).
 
The results of the Carers’ Hub consultation process can help to inform Joint Strategic Needs Assessments, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and other audit and planning processes, and maximise resources through the development of more efficient services and partnerships. The process can be repeated at a later date in order to help monitor local progress on strategy implementation.
 
Although the terminology on the Hub comes from English legislation, the rationale and process are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Further information

Download the PDF iconCarers Hub Toolkit for Commissioners (PDF, 1,241 KB).

There is also a Powerpoint version of the Hub with editable text boxes to make notes and/or compile your results.

Further details of the origins of the Hub and how to assess local services in relation to the Carers' Strategy can be found in Commissioning for Carers: an Action Guide for Decision-Makers and Commissioning Better Outcomes for Carers.

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