Employment

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Type of Content: 
Good Practice

Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC)

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:30
Body: 

About the Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC) project

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.

Each country involved in the EPYC project will develop a new tool, which we hope will help youth professionals - like teachers, social worker or youth workers - to better support young carers.

The tools aim to aid in the identification of young carers, to allow practitioners to assess the situation of young and young adult carers, including measuring the level and impact of the care burden, and to allow practitioners to develop an action plan to address issues adversely affecting young and young adult carers.

We will then trial the tool to see how it can help make Scotland a better place for young and young adult carers to grow up in.

Why is this project happening?

Young and young adult carers carry out, often on a regular basis, significant caring tasks and assume a level of responsibility which would not usually be associated with their age group.

Although research has provided clear evidence that heavy caring responsibilities can result in emotional difficulties, health problems, social exclusion and limited opportunities for social and leisure activities, professional support services are lacking in many EU countries.

Who is involved in the project?

The two year EU funded project started in August 2016  involving a strategic partnership of six European organisations, namely Carers Trust Scotland (UK), Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V. (Germany), Care Alliance Ireland (Ireland), Anziani e non solo (Italy), ARC ORK (Austria) and IPS Versari Macrelli (Italy).

The kick off meeting, hosted by the leading partner, Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V., was held in Berlin on 12 September 2016.

What can you do now?

Expected EPYC project outcomes

In the course of the project, intermediate expected results include:

  • An increased capacity of organisations to identify young and young adult carers.
  • An increased knowledge of promising or successful experiences and practices from other European countries.
  • An increased awareness of the challenges faced by young and young adult carers in the different local contexts involved directly or indirectly in project activities.

The outcome of the project is the improved expertise in this field and professional stakeholders having the knowledge to develop support services for young and young adult carers and work with relevant sectors to improve support.

If you are interested to know more about the EPYC project  contact:

  • Louise Morgan, Carers Trust Scotland, Young Carers Development Manager Working with the SYCSA. 
  • Paul Traynor, Carers Trust Scotland, Policy and Campaigns Officer (Young and Young Adult Carers). 
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Toolkit

Carers Hub: A commissioners tool for mapping local services in consultation with carers

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 10:45
Body: 

The Carers’ Hub is a model of comprehensive carers support, developed by Carers Trust with assistance from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and funding from the Department of Health. It can be used as a resource for all those looking to commission and develop personalised services for carers.

At the centre of the Hub diagram are the outcomes of the refreshed National Carers Strategy for England. The white band represents a three-pronged approach that can be used to inform strategic planning, and the 17 spokes on the outside of the circle illustrate the complete range of interventions that every area needs in order to deliver the intended outcomes.

Using the Carers' Hub

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision. In order to assess what mixture of interventions might be necessary to achieve the outcomes of the National Carers’ Strategy in a local area, the first step would be to carry out consultation to establish:
  • What services are currently available.
  • Which of the National Carers’ Strategy outcomes are being met.
  • Which groups are being served.
  • What local carers and their families want.
A simple way to do this is by printing large copies of the Hub and asking carers to write comments or attach post-it notes under the interventions that are well provided locally. Then use another copy of the Hub (or different colour post-it notes) to repeat the process asking carers to indicate where there are gaps in services. 
 
You may wish to ask carers to make notes on the post-its about the quality of services and who is providing them. As a separate exercise, you may wish to ask carers to repeat the process indicating how well each of the five outcomes at the centre of the Hub are being met. Involving professionals and local service providers in the process will help to give you a complete picture of services in your area.

Local strategic planning

The Hub's three-pronged approach to local strategic planning - in the white middle band of the Hub: carer-led, identify and include and whole-area - can then be applied in order to inform the development and implementation of the most appropriate mix of interventions. 
 
Ideally, carer representatives and professionals should sit down together to analyse the messages and identify priorities, so it may be best to carry out this process at meetings (for example, of carer strategy groups or multi-disciplinary agency groups).
 
The results of the Carers’ Hub consultation process can help to inform Joint Strategic Needs Assessments, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and other audit and planning processes, and maximise resources through the development of more efficient services and partnerships. The process can be repeated at a later date in order to help monitor local progress on strategy implementation.
 
Although the terminology on the Hub comes from English legislation, the rationale and process are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Further information

Download the PDF iconCarers Hub Toolkit for Commissioners (PDF, 1,241 KB).

There is also a Powerpoint version of the Hub with editable text boxes to make notes and/or compile your results.

Further details of the origins of the Hub and how to assess local services in relation to the Carers' Strategy can be found in Commissioning for Carers: an Action Guide for Decision-Makers and Commissioning Better Outcomes for Carers.

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Educational

About Time Grant Evaluations

Following the successful delivery of two About Time Grant programmes, Time for Change and Take Action and Support which addressed issues that can lead to young adult carers becoming disengaged from society, independent evaluations of the two programmes have been produced.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illness
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Primary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, February 12, 2018 - 10:00
Body: 

Key points: 

The objectives of the evaluations were to:
  • Provide an overall evaluation of all data to assess the progress of funded projects against the aims and objectives of the About Time grant programmes and of the wider About Time programme.
  • Conduct a qualitative study with funded projects to identify effective strategies and approaches for supporting and enabling young adult carers.
  • Provide a focused evaluation of data derived from outcomes measurement tools designed to measure the extent of care undertaken, the positive and negative impacts of caring for young adult carers and changes in their lives because of taking part in the funded intervention.
  • Evaluate the impacts of programme delivery and Carers Trust grant making processes on funded organisations.

About Time evaluations

The evaluations of the Time for Change and Take Action and Support grant programmes were structured in three phases and each had its own evaluation report with an overview of the whole programme also produced.

Phase one: February–October 2015

 

Phase two: November 2015–November 2016

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015 to November 2016 Executive Summary PDF (177 KB)

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015  to November 2016 PDF (323 KB)

Phase three: December 2016–October 2017

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 Executive Summary PDF (251 KB)

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 PDF (483 KB)

Overview Report

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Overview Report PDF (519 KB)

Key achievements and learning from the programmes include:

  • Around 7,200 young adult carers have benefited from 114 projects delivered by Carers Trust Network Partners, exceeding the original target of 6,200 young adult carers.
  • Programmes provided support to significant numbers of young adult carers for the first time, with over half of the young people participating being new to Carers Trust Network Partners.
  • Programmes developed a flexible response to the needs of young adult carers, including individual support, group activities and access to small grants for individuals, alongside the development of partnerships.
  • The programme design involved young adult carers and Network Partners, ensuring programmes reflected specific needs across UK.
  • Projects have been successful in reaching a representative group of young adult carers and there was a good geographic spread of projects across the UK.
  • Carers Trust has enabled Network Partners to deliver effective projects by being flexible about delivery approaches and providing good quality support, information and training.
  • The Carers Trust Network has a unique role in supporting the needs of young adult carers.
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Guidance

How you can support young adult carers in employment

Your workplace could have policy in place that specifically deals with issues that carers could face for example periods of absence or requesting flexible working.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessCarers in employment
I work in: 
Employment
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 16:30
Body: 

Create a carers policy for your workplace

Your workplace could have policy in place that specifically deals with issues that carers could face for example periods of absence or requesting flexible working.

By creating a policy specifically for carers, you are showing that you support, value and understand the needs of your employees. Macmillan have developed a template Carers Policy that you may find helpful.

Be aware of your duties as an employer under the Equality Act 2010

Under the Equality Act 2010, you must prevent your employees being discriminated against by association with a protected characteristic. Carers are included in this group.

Raise awareness of young adult carers in your workplace

By creating a working environment where young adult carers feel accepted and supported by all members of staff you will be giving them better support and, as a result, they should feel more valued as a member of the team.

Engage with local carers services

Most areas will have a local carers service nearby where young adult carers can access support. You can find them by looking at the carers services map or via your local authorities’ web page or advice line.

Carers services will be able to advise you on the appropriate steps to take to support young adult carers in the workplace.

Carers Services may be interested in working with employers and businesses to raise awareness so see if anyone would be available at your local service. Give them a call to see what they can offer you.

What is being done to support young adult carers in the workplace?

Carers Trust is holding a series of very successful events in partnership with several global companies for young adult carers. The events show young adult carers that they will be accepted in large workplaces whilst showcasing the skills that young adult carers have.

(The event) opened my eyes about the support companies offer carers and jobs available within these companies. I realised my caring role has taught me transferable skills.

(I enjoyed) the tour workshops, feeling of acceptance and understanding respect.  Increasing aspirations and hearing real life stories. Talking to recruitment agency workers about CV’s, It meant a lot to see how being a carer doesn’t have to stop your aspirations or hold you back.  You can be successful.

Carers Trust is managing the Take Action & Support and Time for Change programmes that aim to help young adult carers in taking action to address barriers to their engaging with educational, employment or training aspects of society and support them in doing so.

The programmes will run from June 2014 – December 2016 and will provide young adult carers with a series of activities promoting personal development, wellbeing and new skills to help support their transition to adulthood whilst recognising that they may have additional barriers relating to their caring role.

Employers for carers

This resource is geared towards employers of all adult carers however the information provided is still relevant to supporting young adult carers in your workplace.

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Guidance

Young adult carers - employment and training

Guidance on some of the challenges young adult carers face in employment, including a young adult carers experiences of employment.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessCarers in employment
I work in: 
Employment
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 16:30
Body: 

What challenges do young adult carers face in employment?

Young adult carers aged 16-18 are twice as likely to be not in education, employment, or training (NEET) as their peers without caring responsibilities due to the additional challenges they face in the workplace and their caring role.

It is likely that you have carers working alongside you in your job although you might not know it. Some signs that your college may be a carer are:

  • being late
  • high levels of absence
  • Fatigue.

Vulnerable to unemployment

Young adult carers are particularly vulnerable to periods of unemployment because of their caring responsibilities which can be misunderstood by employers. This is particularly difficult when a young adult carer is at the outset of their career and has not yet had the opportunity to establish themselves or their capabilities professionally.  

In 2014 Carers Trust published research into the experiences of PDF iconyoung adult carers in employment or training. Young adult carers gain many skills through their caring role for example budgeting, prioritising, increased empathy and deeper understanding of others.

However, young adult cares are struggling to put these skills into practice because of the demands placed on them due to their caring role. On average, the young adult carers that Carers Trust surveyed were absent from work for the equivalent of 17 days per year, and were late or had to leave early on approximately 79 days per year because of their caring responsibilities.

Young adult carers are communicating their situation to their managers but few offer support. 67% of the young adult carers surveyed informed their manager of their caring role but 41% reported that their managers have not been supportive.

Flexible work

Based on these statistics, it is not surprising that young adult carers often choose flexible work that is based close to the person they care for to minimise the potential for disruption to their working lives. Although understandable, the tight criteria on potential jobs leaves them vulnerable to periods of unemployment.

Young adult carers have reported that they do not get clear careers advice that takes the skills gained from their caring role into account. Again, this means that their employment choices are restricted.

Young adult carers experiences of employment

Terry is 20 years old and dreams of opening his own restaurant and becoming a chef. Terry cares for his father and he is determined to make his Dad proud and achieve his goals, even if they do get side-lined at times. He has been caring for his father since he was a small child and was supported by a young carer’s project until he was 18 when he moved to a young adult carer’s project.

Terry has worked a few jobs off and on but has had great difficulty in maintaining stable employment because of his caring role.

He has made his employers aware of his caring role, even going so far as to introduce his managers to his father. His manager said that Terry could take time off if he needed to care for his father.

Terry’s father was suddenly taken to hospital with a life threatening condition so Terry called his employer to tell them that he was unable to come into work. His employer was understanding on the telephone but when he returned to work the next week, Terry found he had half the number of shifts he would normally expect. Eventually Terry had to leave because he could not support himself on the low number of shifts he was offered.

Terry believes that this was because he had to put his caring role first.

Further information

How you can support young adult carers in employment

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Key Info

Who are young adult carers?

Young adult carers are transitioning from childhood into adulthood, and they often go unidentified and unsupported.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 15:15
Body: 

Young adult carers are transitioning from childhood into adulthood. There is no legal age definition for young adult carers, although Carers Trust’s support work focuses on young adults aged between 14 and 25 who care, unpaid, for a friend or family member who due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction cannot cope without their support.

Young adult carers often go unidentified and unsupported, but the negative impacts of caring on young adults, which often increase as they grow older, can have a negative and enduring impact on their own physical health, mental health, education and employment opportunities.

How many young adult carers are there in the UK?

The 2011 census identified more than 375,000 young adult carers in the UK, but this is believed to be a huge underestimate of the true numbers as many young adults hide their caring role or do not identify themselves as carers.

Why do young adult carers need support?

Young adult carers take on significant additional responsibilities which can make the typical transitions from childhood into adulthood especially complex and challenging.

The difficulties they experience as a result of their caring role can have significant and long term negative impacts on their confidence, socialisation, their engagement with education and employment and their overall physical and emotional wellbeing.

View the PDF iconwho are young adult carers infographic to find out more about young adult carers and what they do.

Many young adult carers experience issues with their educationemployment and health.

Further information

Downloads: 
PDF icon Who are Young Adult Carers?PDF icon Young Adult Carers Experiences
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Key Info

Who are young carers?

Young carers are children and young people under 18 years old who provide unpaid care to a family member who is physically or mentally ill, disabled or misuses substances.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:45
Body: 

Young carers are children and young people under 18 years old who provide unpaid care to a family member who is physically or mentally ill, disabled or misuses substances.

The tasks and level of caring undertaken by young carers can vary according to the nature of the illness or disability, the level and frequency of need for care and the structure of the family as a whole.

A young carer may undertake some or all of the following:

  • practical tasks such as cooking, housework, shopping
  • physical care such as lifting, helping up the stairs and physiotherapy
  • personal Care such as dressing, washing and helping someone go to the toilet
  • emotional support such as listening, calming someone and being present
  • household management such as paying the bills, managing finances and collecting benefits
  • looking after siblings such as putting to be and walking to school
  • interpreting for parents with hearing or speech impediments or English as an additional language
  • Administering medication such as insulin needles and preparing daily tablets.

How many young carers are there in the UK?

The 2011 census identifies over 200,000 young carers in the UK, but research by the BBC in 2010 indicates that there are as many as 700,000 young carers living in the UK.

Hidden carers

Carers remain hidden for many reasons including:

  • they do not realise that they are a carer or that their life is different to their peers
  • their parent’s do not realise that their children are carers
  • they worry that the family will be split up and taken into care
  • they don’t want to be any different from their peers
  • their parent’s condition is not obvious so people don’t think that they need any help
  • there has been no opportunity to share their story
  • They see no reason or positive actions occurring as a result of telling their story.

Why do young carers need your support?

Young carers often go unnoticed in their communities, but the negative impacts of caring on young people can be very real and enduring. If left unsupported young carers can take on responsibilities that will have a lasting effect on their health and wellbeing, friendships and life opportunities.

Many young carers experience issues with their:

  • physical health: often severely affected by caring through the night, repeatedly lifting a heavy adult, poor diet and lack of sleep
  • emotional wellbeing: stress, tiredness and mental ill-health are common for young carers
  • isolation: feeling different or isolated from their peers and with limited social opportunities
  • Lack of a stable environment: traumatic life changes such as bereavement, family break-up, losing income and housing, or seeing the effects of an illness or addiction.

The wider impacts of these effects can be felt on a young carer in their education, employment and their health and wellbeing.

Find out more

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Guidance

The Law for carers

The law relating to carers differs across the UK and covers a huge range of issues.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 11:30
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Type of Content: 
Guidance

National Carers Strategy

This page gives details of the objectives and key issues of The Carers’ Strategy, which was published in 2008, and refreshed in 2010.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
Caring for: 
Adults
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 11:00
Body: 

Carers’ Strategy (England) 2008-2018, refreshed 2010

The National Carers’ Strategy published in 2008 set five outcomes to be achieved by 2018, so that carers will be:

  • recognised and supported as an expert care partner
  • enjoying a life outside caring
  • not financially disadvantaged
  • mentally and physically well, treated with dignity
  • children will be thriving, protected from inappropriate caring roles.

In order to achieve these outcomes, the strategy suggests that strategic planning must be carer-led, that services should actively identify and include carers, and that commissioning should take a whole-area approach.

The Coalition Government refreshed this strategy in 2010 retaining these aims but inserting four priority areas:

  1. Supporting early self-identification and involvement in local care planning and individual care planning.
  2. Enabling carers to fulfill their educational and employment potential.
  3. Personalised support for carers and those receiving care.
  4. Support carers to remain healthy.

Acting on these priorities to achieve the five outcomes is the overall goal of the refreshed National Carers’ Strategy and the basis for successful commissioning of services. 

For more information about how these outcomes and priorities originated and the long-term plans to achieve them, read Recognised, Valued and Supported: Next Steps for the Carers' Strategy and the original strategy document, Carers at the Heart of 21st Century Families and Communities.

Details of how to assess the services in a particular area in relation to the Carers' Strategy can be found in Commissioning for Carers: an Action Guide for Decision-Makers and Commissioning Better Outcomes for Carers

Strategy for Carers in Scotland 1999

The Strategy for Carers in Scotland 1999 provides the basic template for the local Council strategies that they are required to publish on a regular basis. There are local variations to these documents. 

National Carers Strategy (Wales) 2000

Reviewed each year with an action plan, this is currently being reviewed in the light of the National Carers Strategy (England) 2008.

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Guidance

Scottish Government Guidance

"Getting It right for Young Carers" is the Scottish Government’s strategy to support young carers and young adult carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Caring for: 
Adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:30
Body: 

Scottish Government – national strategy

Getting It right for Young Carers is Scottish Government’s strategy to support young carers and young adult carers from 2010 until 2015. 

The strategy comprises 46 action points involving professionals across health, education and social services as well as Skills Development Scotland and other voluntary sector services.

It is the vision of Scottish Government that by 2015, increasing numbers of young carers will be effectively identified and supported by statutory and Third Sector services using the Getting It Right For Every Child (GIRFEC) approach.  This will include the provision of an assessment, information and advice and a range of supports.  These will combine to relieve young carers of inappropriate caring roles, to promote their rights under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and enable them to be children and young people first and foremost.  

The vision also means that young carers will:

  • have their rights respected and promoted
  • be treated at all times with respect and dignity
  • be treated as individuals and have any particular or special needs recognised
  • be relieved of inappropriate caring roles and able to enjoy their childhood
  • have a life outside of their caring role
  • be supported to stay physically and mentally well
  • be informed through having access to information, advice and support
  • be involved and empowered in making age appropriate contribution to caring.

Read Getting It Right For Young Carers: The Young Carers Strategy for Scotland: 2010 - 2015 Summary on the Scottish Government website.

Carers Legislation

The first stage of consultation began around proposals for legislation for carers and young carers in January 2014.  The proposals include that:

  • Carers assessments will be renamed carer support plans to describe them more effectively and to encourage uptake.
  • Young carers should have their wellbeing assessed within the GIRFEC framework and with consideration being given as to whether they require a Child’s Plan under the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014.
  • Young carers who are expected to continue their caring role beyond the age of 18 should have planning processes for their carers support plan begin well in  advance of their 18th birthday to ease transition to adult services.

A full copy of the proposals can be read on the Scottish Government website

Carers Trust and the Scottish Young Carers Services Alliance will be consulting with carers and young carers to respond to each stage of consultation through to legislation.

Further information

Further information and resources on issues concerning young people in Scotland, including information on policy and research, are available on the Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People website.

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