Parent carers

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Good Practice

Good practice guide for supporting carers in Wales

This good practice guide, funded by Welsh Government, is designed to be used by regional partnership boards, local authorities, local health boards and third sector organisations in Wales to support the identification and commissioning of good services for unpaid carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental Healthyoung carersSpecialist servicesDay centreHospitalPrimary CareSecondary CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionSchoolsWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health careSchoolsCarers servicesSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 13:00
Body: 
To develop this guide, Carers Trust Wales has undertaken substantial desk research including analysis of academic and other notable publications. Additionally, we have undertaken active research, including in-depth interviews with carers services across Wales, to develop a deeper understanding of what is working well. 
 
Through this approach we have identified evidence-based criteria which can be used to understand the quality and appropriateness of carers services. These criteria recognise that regardless of the service model used, it is essential that all services commissioned to support carers: 
  • Meet obligations under the Social Services and Wellbeing (Wales) Act 2014 
  • Deliver the Wellbeing Objectives under the Wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 
  • Deliver against the Ministerial priorities for carers 
  • Adequately reflect carers’ views, experiences and preferences. 

Download English language version PDF iconGood Practice Approaches to Supporting Carers in Wales 

Download Welsh language version PDF iconDulliau arfer da wrth gefnogi gofalwyr yng Nghymru

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PDF icon Good Practice Guide to Supporting Carers in WalesPDF icon Dulliau arfer da wrth gefnogi gofalwyr yng Nghymru
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Toolkit

Young Carers In Schools - A Toolkit for Local Authorities

Legislation into Practice: Making the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014 a Reality for Young Carers
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Information and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 15:45
Body: 

A resource for local  authorities working with schools to identify and support young carers. 

This resource supports the case for the effective and economic ways that local young carers services offer both preventative and responsive support for young carers and their families. 

It sets out the case to include the Young Carers in Schools Programme in all aspects of educational support and how this would support local authorities to ensure they fulfil their statutory duties as set out in the Children and Families Act 2014 and the Care Act 2014. 

Most importantly it will ensure positive outcomes for young carers and their families. 

PDF iconLegislation into practice toolkit pdf

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PDF icon Legislation into Practice
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Good Practice

Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed In Further Education in Wales

A Wales-specific, user-friendly resource, this toolkit was developed in partnership with Learning and Work Institute to increase awareness of student carers and their specific needs, promote existing good practice from colleges and carers services and offering expert recommendations.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 10:45
Body: 

Student Carers in Further Education

In 2015 Carers Trust worked with the National Institute for Adults Continuing Education (NIACE) to develop a practical resource for colleges. In 2017 Carers Trust Wales and Learning and Work Institute worked together to develop Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed in Further Education in Wales, drawing on good practice from colleges and carers centres across Wales. 

This interactive resource has been designed to generate momentum for identifying and supporting student carers within colleges. We hope that it will inspire and assist all colleges to build on good practice to develop their own approaches to identifying and supporting this student group. In doing so, this will ensure that students who are caring for others - students whom, in many instances, will have overcome very difficult circumstances and have aquired valuable transferable skills along the way - are able to reach their potential and successfully achieve their educational aims. 

Feedback

Carers Trust Wales will be contacting colleges across Wales in September 2018 for feedback on the implementation on the toolkit.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Good Practice GuidePDF icon Cefnogi Myfyrwyr a chanddynt Gyfrifoldebau Gofal: Canllaw Arfer Da
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Toolkit

Young Carers Pharmacy project

Pharmacies are visited by about 1.6 million people every day in England so they are ideally positioned to identify carers of all all ages including young carers. They can therefore play a key role in the early initiation of assessment and support which can be life changing.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary carePharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial care
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

The Engaging with Pharmacies toolkit was aimed at young carer services to support them to work collaboratively with pharmacies. It drew on the Young Carers Pharmacy Project that took place between 2014 and 2016. This was delivered by Carers Trust Network Partner Salford Carers Centre as one of Carers Trust’s Innovation Generation projects.

Further information

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Research

Retirement on Hold

Our Retirement on Hold report highlighted some of the challenges faced by older carers and made recommendations to improve their experience now and in the future. Thank you to all the carers and Network Partners who contributed.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsSpecialist services
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 13:45
Body: 

Key findings from our report

  • Care coordination – carers said they were spending too much time, and became stressed and anxious when trying to organise care and support for the person with care needs. 
  • Carers are caring for someone else when they have their own age-related health condition.
  • The pressures around carers feeling they had a 'duty to care' – the Care Act recognises that caring should be a choice.
  • Lack of appropriate replacement care to enable carers to take a break. 

Our key recommendations

  • Access to a 'care coordinator' – many older carers felt this would help them navigate the health and care system. It is recognised that with limited resources this may not be feasible, however, earlier referral to a carer organisation may help improve the situation for carers. 
  • Appropriate and timely access to information and advice about support available locally, nationally and UK wide. This information would need to recognise that not all older carers are able to access the internet.
  • Improved access to appropriate and good quality replacement care.
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Good Practice

Older Carers Toolkit

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsSpecialist servicesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 13:15
Body: 

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.

It shines a spotlight on particular issues most likely to impact on older carers. This can help inform commissioning to properly and most cost-effectively support them. It will also help commissioners fulfil duties to prevent, reduce and delay needs and to support older carers under the Care Act 2014.

Further information

Download the toolkit PDF iconCaring About Older Carers (PDF 307KB)

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Good Practice

Identification of carers in GP practices

Not enough carers are likely to be receiving the support they need or are entitled to. One of the main obstacles to carers getting the right support is identification – both self-identification and identification by health professionals.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary care
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 12:45
Body: 


There are an estimated seven million unpaid carers in the UK, however not enough carers are likely to be receiving the support they need or are entitled to. One of the main obstacles to carers getting the right support is identification – both self-identification and identification by health professionals.


Self-identification can be problematic as many carers, understandably, see their relationship with the person they care for as one of being a parent, child, neighbour, friend or partner and don’t recognise 'carer' as a term they would use.


This is why identification by health professionals becomes even more important.


Carers Trust’s Raising the voice of carers project works with local Network Partners and aims to give carers the tools and confidence to campaign on issues that matter to them.

Further information

Read our resource –  PDF iconIdentification of Carers in GP Practices (PDF 434 KB).

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Good Practice

Carers Trust ADVANCE mentoring scheme

ADVANCE was an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK. It ran from 2015 to 2018 and is backed by materials for you to download (all available below).
I work in: 
Carers services
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

ADVANCE Mentoring Programme – introduction/overview

Is good leadership about:
  • Knowing all the answers, pretty much all of the time?
  • Coming up with clear-cut solutions to complex problems?
  • Keeping your thoughts to yourself and not being swayed by other people?
Not so, according to a three-year impact study of ADVANCE, an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK – local charities delivering a range of services addressing the needs of unpaid carers and the people they care for. The traditional ‘heroic’ approach to leadership was considered by participants in the 12-month programme to be much less effective than the ability to:
  • Ask searching questions.
  • Listen carefully to different views.
  • Take time to reflect before acting.
Participating in ADVANCE enabled board members and chief executives to re-interpret their leadership role to fit a drastically changing world – a world where flexibility trumps rigidity every time. 
 
There is much to be learned from the experience of senior leaders who learned ‘on the run’ to enhance their confidence and skills in order to regain control of their lives and organisations. 
 
The independent impact study of the ADVANCE mentoring programme, commissioned by Carers Trust and carried out by Marsaili Cameron and Sheila Marsh from PublicServiceWorks, developed materials to support chief executives, board members and others to work separately and together in a focused way to ensure effective strategic leadership.
 
Findings from this study fed in regularly over three years to the ADVANCE mentors (senior volunteers from a wide range of backgrounds) and to the Carers Trust design team for the programme. This process enhanced the learning culture that characterised ADVANCE, supported by the work of Lead Mentor, Hilary Samson-Barry.
 

What materials are available, and how might you use them?

Want a summary of the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme?Deep Learning for Hard Times

  • PDF iconDeep Learning for Hard Times (PDF, 219KB) – a booklet summing up the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
  • Info cards – to support implementing the learning in similar local charities:
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards A-C  (PDF, 190KB) – focusing on building sustainability, strengthening governance and developing partnership/collaboration – the three top issues tackled through the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards 1-5  (PDF, 351KB) – focusing on transferable skills and practical insights gained by participants in the ADVANCE mentoring programme.

Want to make a presentation or work with a group?

Want to know more about the ADVANCE mentoring programme impact study and see the evidence behind the summary?

Want to discuss ADVANCE further?

If you would like to hear more about the context of  the ADVANCE mentoring programme and its introduction, email Carers Trust.
 
If you would like to know more about the methodology of the impact study, email Sheila Marsh or Marsaili Cameron of PublicServiceWorks.
Downloads: 
PDF icon Deep Learning for Hard Times (plus see more downloads below)
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How-to Guide

Triangle of Care Toolkit - A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

This resource is designed for services implementing the Triangle of Care, it is based on what has worked and what has prevented successful implementation in other organisations. It includes guidance, tips and good practice to guide professionals and carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecialist servicesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carers
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 15:30
Body: 

Introduction

The Triangle of Care was launched in 2010 and was developed by carers who were supporting someone who regularly needed acute inpatient mental health services. It identified six key standards that if in place would mean that the carer would be better involved and supported by mental health services.

Since the launch, Carers Trust has led on the programme in England developing the original guide so that it can be implemented across all mental health services including specialist, forensic, children’s, older people’s and community.

In 2013 the Triangle of Care membership scheme was launched to enable mental health providers to receive formal recognition of their commitment to cultural change and carer involvement. Since its launch, 31 NHS trusts have joined the scheme and their experience, knowledge, good practice and pitfalls have been identified to help develop a toolkit for implementation of the Triangle of Care.

You can download the full toolkit here, or review the appropriate section online: PDF iconTriangle of Care Toolkit

The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

The experiences of the 31 trusts who have joined the Triangle of Care membership scheme between 2013 and April 2015 have been extensive. Carers Trust has been able to identify good practice where it has been implemented which has ensured a more successful implementation of the Triangle of Care. These experiences have been collated to develop a toolkit. This toolkit aims to support trusts who are at the beginning of their Triangle of Care journey, those who are yet to begin and those who are already well progressed but want to learn from their peers and ensure a legacy of cultural change.

The toolkit focuses on the different elements that trusts should consider when implementing the Triangle of Care across their services and more information on each area can be found in the toolkit:

  • Strategic buy-in and support
  • Commissioning and reporting levers including Care Act 2014
  • Staff promotion and buy-in
  • Carer partners and Service user partners
  • Carer champions
  • What good looks like and celebrating good practice
  • A willingness to be honest and encouraging the value of honesty and frequently asked questions

These elements have been identified as important to successful implementation if they are in place. While not all the elements are in place in all trusts many trusts do have a majority in place and this has helped their journey be more successful.

Downloads: 
PDF icon The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers
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