Pharmacy Services

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Guidance

Flu Vaccinations for Carers campaign - useful resources

NHS Employers and Carers Trust produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014 which healthcare staff can download .
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:15
Body: 

Help reach carers across the whole community

NHS Employers and Carers Trust  produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014. Carers Trust also produced a set of resources aimed to be used by a wide range of organisations to as well as individuals to encourage flu vaccination uptake among carers. The resources also encourage carers to get in touch with Carers Trust for details of their local carer service. 

The Word versions of each resource were designed to be customised to include your organisation’s own logo.

Further details

For more information about the Flu Vaccination Campaign for Carers, please email Carers Trust.

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Good Practice

Supporting carers of people with dementia in black, Asian and minority ethnic communities

A good practice example of working with carers of people with dementia from diverse communities by the Dementia Information and Support for Carers (DISC) service hosted by Sandwell Crossroads Birmingham
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecial education needsSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesDementia care
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:45
Body: 

DISC Dementia information and support for carers

The Disc Service was launched 11 years ago, it is hosted by Sandwell Crossroads and funded by Sandwell and West Birmingham, Cross City, South Central CCG’s, and Birmingham City Council through the Birmingham Bettercare Fund

The service originally operated in West Birmingham, but had funding extended to cover the entire Birmingham City Council area.

The service is focused on supporting carers from the diverse communities in the Birmingham area. The DISC service prides itself on being proactive in recruiting staff from local black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities who have both the language skills and understand the cultural sensitivities.

The service supports over 400 carers and offers Iiformation, advocacy and support for carers, though one-to-one contact and successful weekly information and support groups.

It also offers a signposting and referral service into other local statutory and voluntary sector services.

Examples of the type of help and support carers have receive:

  • Accessing respite
  • Liaising with district nurses, occupational therapists and social workers.
  • Continence advice and support.
  • Advice in managing changing and unusual behaviours.
  • Finding the right care such as day centres, care homes and care agencies.
  • Talking to the wider family.
  • Advice on benefits and carers' rights.
  • Information on the Mental Capacity Act.
  • Information on lasting power of attorney

DISC's strengths

  • Building relationships with carers over a long period of time.
  • Stepping in to offer support before a crisis develops.
  • Bridging the gap between clinical diagnosis and families coping alone.
  • Making carers feel welcome – 14 of them formally volunteer in supporting other carers.
  • Being led by carers, listening to carers and developing services to meet need.
  • Feeling passionate about the service.

Further information

For more information on the service contact Jo.Moon@sandwellcrossroads.org or visit the Sandwell Crossroads website.

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Toolkit

Young Carers Pharmacy project

Pharmacies are visited by about 1.6 million people every day in England so they are ideally positioned to identify carers of all all ages including young carers. They can therefore play a key role in the early initiation of assessment and support which can be life changing.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary carePharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial care
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

The Engaging with Pharmacies toolkit is aimed at young carer services to support them to work collaboratively with pharmacies. It draws on the Young Carers Pharmacy Project that took place between 2014 and 2016. This was delivered by Carers Trust Network Partner Salford Carers Centre as one of Carers Trust’s Innovation Generation projects.

Further information

Download the following resources:

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Research

A Road Less Rocky Supporting Carers of People with Dementia

A Road Less Rocky is a report from Carers Trust that found that carers of people with dementia are not getting the support and advice they often desperately need.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 14:00
Body: 

The report found that there were a number of critical points along a carer’s journey where they would most value information and support. These critical points include:

  1. When dementia is diagnosed.
  2. When the carer takes on an 'active' caring role.
  3. When the capacity of the person with dementia declines.
  4. When the carer needs emotional support and/or a break from caring.
  5. When the person with dementia loses their mobility.
  6. When the person with dementia has other health problems.
  7. When the carer has to cope with behavioural problems.
  8. When the carer's own circumstances change.
  9. When the person with dementia becomes incontinent.
  10. When decisions about residential care and end of life care have to be made

We have designed a toolkit around these ten points,the issues carers face at these points and what will make a positive difference. It has been produced to sit alongside A Road Less Rocky and gives guidance to professionals who come in contact with carers. The toolkit is useful for anyone who works with or treats patients with dementia and is therefore likely to come into contact with carers. 

A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia complements the Triangle of Care Carers included: A Guide to best Practice for Dementia Care. This document describes how meaningful involvement and inclusion of carers can lead to better care for people with dementia, identifying six key standards required to achieve better collaboration and partnership with carers.

Although the terminology and legislation referred to in this toolkit applies to England the standards and rationale are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Further information

Find further information and download the full report A Road Less Rocky – Supporting Carers of People with Dementia (PDF, 962KB).

Download the toolkit PDF iconA Road Less Rocky: Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers, A Guide on how to Support Carers of People with dementia

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Children and young people’s mental health can be affected by their caring role, whether the condition of the person they care is related to physical health, mental health, an addiction or frailty in old age. 

The mental health of young carers, aged 17 or under

The evidence shows that young carers have worse mental health than their peers:

  • A survey of 348 young carers found 48% said being a young carer made them feel stressed and 44% said it made them feel tired. 
  • A survey of 61 young carers in school found that 38% had mental health problems. 
  • The 2011 Census showed that young carers providing 50+ hours of care a week were up to five times more likely to report their general health as ‘Not good’. 

The mental health of young adult carers, aged 16-25 

Young adults with caring roles report higher rates of anxiety and depression. The GP Patient Survey finds that a third more young adult carers report anxiety or depression than other young people- 39% for young adult carers, in contrast with 28% of young people without caring responsibilities.  

A Carers Trust survey of young adult carers found that 45% reported mental health problems. 

Improving the mental health of young carers and young adult carers

The Time to be Heard campaign calls for better support for young adult carers and their families to address caring roles that have a negative impact on their health, including mental health. We are also calling for local plans to improve children’s mental health services, sometimes called Local Transformation Plans, to include measures that improve the mental health of young carers and young adult carers.

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Promotional

Carer-friendly pharmacy resources

Resources to help community pharmacies support carers.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary carePharmacy ServicesCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, October 12, 2015 - 16:30
Body: 

These resources were developed by Carers Trust, the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee and the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education.

Training

The training for the Carer-friendly Pharmacy has been co-designed by the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education and Carers Trust and includes handouts and an evaluation form. The slides can be customised to capture local information such as the details of the local carers organisation and the services they provide. 

To support staff in using PharmOutcomes to refer carers to their local carers organisation and notify the carer's GP practice. PSNC has produced some PharmOutcomes System Guides.

Additional resources 

Microsoft Office document iconManaging medicines leaflet for carers

Microsoft Office document iconPharmacy services useful to carers leaflet

 

 

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Toolkit

Carer Friendly Pharmacy Pilot Evaluation

The Carer-friendly Pharmacy Pilot was part of a programme of work funded by the Department of Health in its implementation of the National Carers Strategy through the ‘Supporting Carers in Primary Care Programme’.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 11:45
Body: 

Reflecting on the Carer-friendly Pharmacy Pilot

 

Evaluation

The Carer Friendly Pharmacy Pilot ended in February 2015 and was evaluated by the Centre for Research, Labour and Inequalities (CIRCLE) at the University of Leeds. You can read the evaluation PDF iconhere. If you have any comments or feedback on the pilot, please email Carers Trust

You can access the resources from the Carer Friendly Pharmacy project by clicking this link

In exploring an area which could be of potential interest to the NHS and local authorities as a nationally or locally commissioned service, the Carer-friendly Pharmacy pilot has been helpful in demonstrating the key role community pharmacies could play in the early identification and support of carers while examining issues such as workload and time requirements in practice. All parties agree that if the Carer-friendly Pharmacy model is to be  rolled out further it will need to be appropriately and sustainably funded for community pharmacy contractors.

Since then, with the launch of the new pharmacy flu vaccination service enabling many carers to have a free NHS flu vaccination at their local pharmacy, Carers Trust has been working with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committeee, the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education and the Royal Phamaceutical Society to develop guidance and resources to help pharmacy teams identify carers for flu vaccinations and, where possible, notify the carer's GP that they are a carer as well. 

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Toolkit

Overview of pharmacies and how they can identify, support and refer carers

Pharmacies hold a unique position in terms of their accessibility, the frequency with which many carers visit their local pharmacy and the supportive and professional relationship they develop with regular customers.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesSocial careCommissioningPharmacy Services
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 14:30
Body: 

Pharmacies hold a unique position in terms of their accessibility, the frequency with which many carers visit their local pharmacy and the supportive and professional relationship they develop with regular customers. 

This position puts them in a strong position to support carers – not only for their ability to provide a range of advice and healthcare services, but also to be able to identify carers and refer them on to GPs and local carers services.

Steps to becoming a carer-friendly pharmacy

Pharmacies can become ‘carer friendly’ by taking a few simple steps and by committing to the support of carers. 

  • Ensure all staff are trained to be carer aware, sensitive to carers’ needs and the challenges they face and understand the best way to engage effectively with carers.
  • Ensure all staff are pro-active in identifying, referring and supporting carers.
  • Identify a member of the team to take on the role of ‘Carers Champion’, to lead and facilitate carer referrals and act as a contact point for the local carers centre. 
  • Display posters and leaflets to encourage carers to self-identify.

Other steps you could take include:

  • Ensure there are agreed carer pathways in place, including those associated with the services the pharmacy offers such as Medicines Use Reviews and prescription collection and delivery. Using these carer pathways, the pharmacy will be able to offer a range of existing services to carers in a manner that is relevant to the carer.
  • Pro-actively speak to people using pharmacy services who you think may be a carer, and with their consent refer them to their local carer’s service and GP.
  • Have in place agreed pathways for the referral process – a pathway to services that could support carers to enjoy improved health and well-being and improve their ability to care.
  • Follow agreed procedures to obtain the consent of the carer and, where relevant, the consent of the person they care for, where referrals are being made or where the carer is going to be present while the person with care needs is having a Medicines Use Review or other pharmacy provided services. 

These simple steps could be augmented by local ‘add-ons’, such as pharmacy delivery engagement with carers, pharmacy-based health checks and free flu vaccinations for carers where the pharmacy has been commissioned to do so or where the pharmacy agrees to provide this service free of charge.

Carer Friendly Pharmacy Pilot Resources

The following resources are available to those pharmacies identified as taking part in the pilot, and participants can order additional supplies by contacting your local carers service in the designated areas.

  • posters (A3, A4 & A5)
  • leaflets
  • referral forms
  • badges to be worn by pharmacy staff
  • training attendance certificates
  • training workbooks
  • dispenser for the leaflets
  • dispenser for the referral forms.  

You can view some of the leaflets and training material on the pharmacy pilot resources page.

Related pages

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Toolkit

The role of the Pharmacy Carers Champion

Details of the skills, knowledge and role of the Pharmacy Carers Champion.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 14:30
Body: 

The role of the pharmacy carers champion includes:

  • attending carer awareness training
  • attending Carers’ Champion meetings, a maximum of twice a year
  • maintaining and refreshing your Carers Notice Board or other information point for carers within your pharmacy
  • displaying and maintaining supplies of carers’ leaflets and, where possible, posters in your pharmacy
  • identifying yourself to customers as a Carers’ Champion by having your name displayed on your Carers’ Notice Board and wearing a Carers’ Champion badge or sash
  • co-ordinating carer referrals and other initiatives relating to carers
  • reading Carers Champion E-bulletins and brief colleagues.

Skills and knowledge

  • enthusiasm and motivation for the role
  • basic understanding of carers’ needs or a willingness to learn
  • empathy for carers.

A Carers Champion is not expected to be an expert on ‘carers issues’ or provide carers with one-to-one support.   

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Key Info

Who was involved in the Carer Friendly Pharmacy pilot?

The Carer-friendly Pharmacy Pilot could not have taken place without the good will and support of PSNC, CPPE, local carers organisations, Local Pharmaceutical Committees and local community pharmacies..
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 14:15
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