Scotland

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Good Practice

Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC)

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:30
Body: 

About the Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC) project

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.

Each country involved in the EPYC project will develop a new tool, which we hope will help youth professionals - like teachers, social worker or youth workers - to better support young carers.

The tools aim to aid in the identification of young carers, to allow practitioners to assess the situation of young and young adult carers, including measuring the level and impact of the care burden, and to allow practitioners to develop an action plan to address issues adversely affecting young and young adult carers.

We will then trial the tool to see how it can help make Scotland a better place for young and young adult carers to grow up in.

Why is this project happening?

Young and young adult carers carry out, often on a regular basis, significant caring tasks and assume a level of responsibility which would not usually be associated with their age group.

Although research has provided clear evidence that heavy caring responsibilities can result in emotional difficulties, health problems, social exclusion and limited opportunities for social and leisure activities, professional support services are lacking in many EU countries.

Who is involved in the project?

The two year EU funded project started in August 2016  involving a strategic partnership of six European organisations, namely Carers Trust Scotland (UK), Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V. (Germany), Care Alliance Ireland (Ireland), Anziani e non solo (Italy), ARC ORK (Austria) and IPS Versari Macrelli (Italy).

The kick off meeting, hosted by the leading partner, Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V., was held in Berlin on 12 September 2016.

What can you do now?

Expected EPYC project outcomes

In the course of the project, intermediate expected results include:

  • An increased capacity of organisations to identify young and young adult carers.
  • An increased knowledge of promising or successful experiences and practices from other European countries.
  • An increased awareness of the challenges faced by young and young adult carers in the different local contexts involved directly or indirectly in project activities.

The outcome of the project is the improved expertise in this field and professional stakeholders having the knowledge to develop support services for young and young adult carers and work with relevant sectors to improve support.

If you are interested to know more about the EPYC project  contact:

  • Louise Morgan, Carers Trust Scotland, Young Carers Development Manager Working with the SYCSA. 
  • Paul Traynor, Carers Trust Scotland, Policy and Campaigns Officer (Young and Young Adult Carers). 
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Key Info

Preventing Crisis for Carers

Preventing Crisis for Carers was a joint project between Carers Trust Scotland, local carers’ centres, and health and social care professionals.
Area of Care: 
Secondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitals
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:15
Body: 

Preventing Crisis for Carers (The Moffat Project)

With funding from the Moffat Trust, Preventing Crisis for Carers was a joint project between Carers Trust Scotland, local carers’ centres, and health and social care professionals. 

The programme concluded in June 2010 and aimed to: 

  • get support for carers at an early stage
  • advise carers of their rights and offer them a carer’s assessment
  • reduce the pressure on carers’ own health
  • get carers involved in discharge planning
  • train health and social care professionals in carer awareness.

Named after the Moffat Charitable Trust which supplied the funding for the initiative, the project placed carer support workers into hospitals and social work departments. Workers helped identify new carers, directed them to sources of support and trained health care professionals in carer awareness.

What was the Programme about?

The overall programme was made up of four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland. Each pilot site used the knowledge and experience of carer organisations, which were part of The Princess Royal Trust for Carers (now Carers Trust Scotland) Network, and promoted partnership work between the local carers' centres, health and social care professionals to identify carers early on in their caring role. 

The good ways of working and protocols developed by the programme aimed to ensure that all carers who came into contact with health were:

  • identified as carers
  • signposted to local advice
  • made aware of their rights and could access appropriate support to help them with their caring responsibilities.

The Pilot Sites

The four NHS board areas covered by the Moffat pilots were NHS Ayrshire and Arran, NHS Borders, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and NHS Lothian. Local carers' centres led the pilot work in partnership with local health and social care professionals.

What happened?

As a result of the programme almost 3,000 new carers were identified and more than 3,500 health and social care professionals were trained in carer awareness. 

An independent evaluation of the project by Glasgow Caledonian University found that the Crisis Prevention Programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals: 

  • professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage
  • there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers
  • carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer
  • carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received 
  • carers were provided with more information ,such as being told of their right to a carer’s assessment.

The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Read the PDF iconfinal evaluation report, or a PDF iconsummary of the report.  

Some of the people involved in the Moffat Project (health professionals, carers’ centre staff and volunteers) talk about their experiences in an audio podcast.

Further Developments

For more information on developments please contact Carers Trust Scotland on scotland@carers.org or phone 0300 123 2008.

Equal Partners in Care

A further development has been Equal Partners in Care (EPiC).  This is a joint project between NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to implement the workforce education and learning elements of Caring Together 2010-15, the Carers Strategy for Scotland.

It aims to support workers from health, social services and other sectors to work in partnership with carers and young carers, and to achieve better outcomes for all involved in the caring relationship. The aim is to do this by providing learning resources to help best practice become universal practice.

View the Equal Partners in Care website.

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PDF icon Preventing Crisis for Carers - full report
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Guidance

Preventing Crisis for Carers Conference

A key strand of the Preventing Crisis for Carers programme was sharing the approaches and best practice being developed by the pilot sites. The findings are still of relevance today and continue to influence practice.
Area of Care: 
Secondary Care
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsHealth and wellbeing
I work with: 
Parent carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:15
Body: 

A key strand of the Preventing Crisis for Carers programme was sharing the approaches and best practice being developed by the pilot sites. Although the conference was held at the end of 2008, the findings are still of relevance today and continue to influence practice.

The one day conference gave health, social work and voluntary sector practitioners the opportunity to highlight and share models of good practice and joint work which are effective in the early identification and support for carers.

A carers journey

Florence Burke (Director for Scotland, Carers Trust Scotland) set the context for the day by looking at PDF icona carer’s journey - considering who carers are and the impact of caring - in addition to providing the background to the Moffat Trust funded Preventing Crisis for Carers programme.

Representatives from Glasgow Caledonian University, who were undertaking the monitoring and evaluation of the programme, reported on the baseline findings from the on-going evaluation - looking at the over-all complexity, the evaluation methods employed and some early indications from the work of the programme.

The Scottish Government’s Minister for Public Health at the time spoke to the conference about the Scottish Government’s commitment to carers and the legislation that was is in place to underpin this. 

Delegates were provided with the opportunity to share in the experience from the four Moffat Programme pilot sites:

  • NHS Ayrshire and Arran
  • NHS Borders
  • NHS Greater Glasgow
  • Clyde and NHS Lothian.

Models of good practice

Delegates consided models of good practice that could be developed locally to meet the requirements laid down for carer information strategies.

For further information on how the programme has developed or to obtain copies of the presentations, please contact Carers Trust Scotland on scotland@carers.org or phone 0300 123 2008.

Downloads: 
PDF icon How Well Are We Delivering for Carers?PDF icon A Carer’s Journey Through Health
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Guidance

Policy and legislation in Scotland

The law relating to carers differs across the UK. The Scottish Parliament has responsibility for health, the NHS and social care, so most of the legislation which affects carers in Scotland is discussed in the Scottish Parliament.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careCommissioning
Caring for: 
Adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 11:15
Body: 

The law for carers in Scotland

The law relating to carers differs across the UK. The Scottish Parliament has responsibility for health, the NHS and social care, so most of the legislation which affects carers in Scotland is discussed in the Scottish Parliament. The Equality Act 2010, laws around flexible working for carers, and legislation relating to benefits for carers is UK-wide and so is also applicable to carers in Scotland.

There is also a specific piece of legislation for carers introduced in early 2015. The Carers (Scotland) Bill will consolidate existing rights from other pieces of legislation as well as enshrining new rights for carers in law. Like all Scottish legislation it will go through a three-stage process, allowing for debate and discussion in committees, evidence to be gathered and amendments to be made. This allows opportunities for the Bill to be further strengthened and we will be working closely with the Scottish Government, MSPs and other decision-makers, carers and Network Partners to make sure the Bill can make a real difference for carers and carers’ services.

Key legislation

A strategy for carers

Scotland has a Carers’ Strategy. Caring Together: The Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010-2015 is a framework for policy and legislation development in Scotland and has driven the development of a range of projects and initiatives that aim to improve the lives of Scotland’s carers, ensure that organisations and services are able to support carers and recognise them as equal partners in care, and support carers to have a life outside of caring and to care with confidence. 

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Carers Rights Charter

As set out in the Carers’ Strategy, Carers Scotland and the Minority Ethnic Carers Project (MECOPP) have been commissioned by the Scottish Government to develop a Carers Rights Charter. Consultation on the Charter took place in 2013 with carers and carers’ organisations, and the final Charter of Rights will be launched in conjunction with the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities in 2014.

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Self-directed support

Legislation on Self-directed support (SDS) was passed in 2012. The Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 ensures that all individuals and families who receive social care support (including carers) have choice and control over how this support is delivered, by being offered different options on how they take the support.

Carers can help the person they look after to manage these support options, or if carers are receiving a support service in their own right, they are also entitled to options when getting support.

Carers Trust Scotland has produced a guide for carers on SDS. The Scottish Government’s SDS website also gives more detailed information on SDS options, how SDS works in practice, and examples and case studies of SDS users. 

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Integration of health and social care

The Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act came into force in 2014 and legislates for health boards and local authorities to integrate budgets and services and to ensure that health and social care provision across Scotland is joined-up and seamless, especially for people with long term conditions and disabilities and their carers.

The legislation and the regulations and guidance that accompany it support the arrangements for integrating health and social care, in order to improve outcomes for patients, service users, carers and their families. This will enable health boards and local authorities to work together effectively to deliver quality, sustainable care services.

Carers and service users are supported to be involved and make decisions about services in their areas, with consultation required when integration schemes are being developed, when strategic plans are being developed and reviewed, and at any other time when a decision might significantly affect the provision of services in an area. 

Since the consultation stage of the Act, we have been calling for carers and service users to be involved in a supported and meaningful way so that their participation is as valuable as possible.

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A Carers’ Bill for Scotland

In October 2013, at the second Carers’ Parliament, Alex Salmond announced the Scottish Government’s intention to legislate for carers before the Scottish General Election in 2016.

A consultation on the proposals for a Carers’ Bill ran from January 2014 to April 2014 and examined the possibilities to introduce further duties for statutory bodies, and new rights and entitlements for unpaid carers.

All aspects of the carer journey were consulted on, from identification and assessment through to service provision, carer involvement and service review. Young carers were also explicitly included in these legislative proposals.

The Carers (Scotland) Bill was launched on 9 March 2015 and will consolidate existing rights from other pieces of legislation as well as enshrining new rights for carers in law. Like all Scottish legislation it will go through a three-stage process, allowing for debate and discussion in committees, evidence to be gathered and amendments to be made. This allows opportunities for the Bill to be further strengthened and we will be working closely with the Scottish Government, MSPs and other decision-makers, carers and Network Partners to make sure the Bill can make a real difference for carers and carers’ services.

The Bill sets out a range of measures to improve identification and support to carers, including the introduction of a new duty on local authorities to support carers who meet certain eligibility criteria.. This is a big change from the current system where local authorities have a power to support carers if they choose to.

Carers Trust Scotland has produced a PDF iconbriefing on the Carers (Scotland) Bill, and a summary specifically looking at its PDF iconprovisions for young carers.

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Charging

Regulations that are part of the Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 prevent carers from being charged for social care services that they have been assessed as needing to be provided to them in order to support them to provide care. This includes (but is not limited to)

  • the provision of information and advice
  • advocacy for carers and young carers
  • emotional support and counselling
  • training for carers and young carers
  • support with housework or gardening or other similar activity
  • cost of taxi fares and driving lessons in special circumstances
  • short breaks
  • translation and interpretation services.

Carers assessment

Most services are provided following the identification of need through a Carer’s Assessment. If the carer is not eligible for a Carer’s Assessment, because he or she does not carry out a substantial amount of care on a regular basis, then local authorities have the discretion to provide support to the carer without an assessment having been carried out. Charges should also be waived in this situation. 

There are some limitations to waiving of charges around short breaks, driving lessons and taxi fares, and household tasks. The briefing below goes into greater detail about these limitations and the impact on carers who are receiving these kinds of services and support.

This right of carers not to be charged for support applies to services provided to both adult carers and to young carers for services provided under the Social Care (Self-directed support) (Scotland) Act 2013 and under S22 of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

Carers Trust Scotland, along with the other national carer organisations, has produced an easy-read briefing about PDF iconwaiving of charges for carers who are receiving self-directed support.

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PDF icon Waiving of charges for carers - summaryPDF icon Carers (Scotland) Bill - briefing
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Guidance

Young Carers Assessment in Scotland

The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 means that young carers, along with any other child with additional needs, should have any needs concerning their well-being assessed through the process of the child’s plan.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:30
Body: 

The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014, legislating for the Getting It Right For Every Child (GIRFEC) approach means that young carers, along with any other child with additional needs, should have any needs concerning their well-being assessed through the process of the child’s plan. This will ensure there is a single planning approach for children who need additional support from services, providing a single point of contact for every child and providing a holistic understanding of wellbeing.

The tools used in the process include the Resilience Matrix and the My World Triangle.

Young carer services in Scotland work with partner agencies to meet the needs of the child.  Training for practitioners is usually available locally from GIRFEC teams. Guidance around implementation of the Act is currently being developed for practitioners and is expected to be published in the summer of 2014.

Additional support needs

In addition, the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004 (as amended in 2009) places a duty on local authorities to make arrangements to identify children and young people’s additional support needs.

Any parent or young person is entitled to ask a local authority to assess if a child or young person has additional support needs, and if they need a Co-ordinated Support Plan (CSP).  Not all young people with additional support needs will require a CSP, some may require more of a ’light touch’ intervention.

Many young carers’ services have developed their own assessment process to inform their work with individual young carers.

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Guidance

Scottish Government Guidance

"Getting It right for Young Carers" is the Scottish Government’s strategy to support young carers and young adult carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Caring for: 
Adults
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:30
Body: 

Scottish Government – national strategy

Getting It right for Young Carers is Scottish Government’s strategy to support young carers and young adult carers from 2010 until 2015. 

The strategy comprises 46 action points involving professionals across health, education and social services as well as Skills Development Scotland and other voluntary sector services.

It is the vision of Scottish Government that by 2015, increasing numbers of young carers will be effectively identified and supported by statutory and Third Sector services using the Getting It Right For Every Child (GIRFEC) approach.  This will include the provision of an assessment, information and advice and a range of supports.  These will combine to relieve young carers of inappropriate caring roles, to promote their rights under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and enable them to be children and young people first and foremost.  

The vision also means that young carers will:

  • have their rights respected and promoted
  • be treated at all times with respect and dignity
  • be treated as individuals and have any particular or special needs recognised
  • be relieved of inappropriate caring roles and able to enjoy their childhood
  • have a life outside of their caring role
  • be supported to stay physically and mentally well
  • be informed through having access to information, advice and support
  • be involved and empowered in making age appropriate contribution to caring.

Read Getting It Right For Young Carers: The Young Carers Strategy for Scotland: 2010 - 2015 Summary on the Scottish Government website.

Carers Legislation

The first stage of consultation began around proposals for legislation for carers and young carers in January 2014.  The proposals include that:

  • Carers assessments will be renamed carer support plans to describe them more effectively and to encourage uptake.
  • Young carers should have their wellbeing assessed within the GIRFEC framework and with consideration being given as to whether they require a Child’s Plan under the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014.
  • Young carers who are expected to continue their caring role beyond the age of 18 should have planning processes for their carers support plan begin well in  advance of their 18th birthday to ease transition to adult services.

A full copy of the proposals can be read on the Scottish Government website

Carers Trust and the Scottish Young Carers Services Alliance will be consulting with carers and young carers to respond to each stage of consultation through to legislation.

Further information

Further information and resources on issues concerning young people in Scotland, including information on policy and research, are available on the Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People website.

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Guidance

Current guidance on young carers for schools (Scotland)

Here are the main documents of policy, legislation and guidance which direct professionals working in a Scottish context to how they should support young carers in education settings.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awareness
I work in: 
Social careEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Caring for: 
AdultsYoung people
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 11:30
Body: 
"It is vital that young carers can continue to participate in the education system in a way that allows them to fulfil their potential……… A key part of that is to ensure not only that young carers are identified in our education system, but that young people in our schools understand the role that young carers have and that teachers are educated about the difficulties that some young carers face." Michael Matheson, Minister for Public Health, January 2012 


Here are the main documents of policy, legislation and guidance which direct professionals working in a Scottish context to how they should support young carers in education settings. 

2010 review recommendations

The Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004 and 2009 introduces a framework for providing for children and young people who require additional support with their learning for any reason. The Act places certain duties on local authorities to identify and monitor the additional needs and the support provided, and respond to parents’ request for an assessment. 

In 2010, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (now part of Education Scotland) carried out a review of the impact of the Act on certain groups, including young carers. Recommendations were made as follows:

  • Education authorities, partner agencies and establishments should improve approaches to identifying and addressing the needs of children and young people who are looked after, who are young carers and those with mental health issues.
  • Education authorities should achieve better consistency in the provision of coordinated support plans for children and young people who meet the relevant criteria for having one, with particular consideration being given to children and young people who are looked after, are young carers, or have mental health disorders.
  • Education authorities and NHS Boards should review availability and access to specialist support services for children and young people with mental health issues.
  • Scottish Government and education authorities should ensure that relevant data and information are collected and managed effectively to help children receive, and benefit from, appropriate support.
  • Education authorities, partner agencies and establishments should ensure that staff have appropriate training to help them meet the needs of children and young people with additional support needs.
  • Education authorities and establishments should ensure that parents of children who are looked after, are young carers, or who have mental health issues are aware of their entitlements under the Act. These children and young people themselves should also be made aware of their entitlements under the Act.

Further information can be obtained from the Education Scotland website.

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Getting it right for young carers

‘Getting It Right for Young Carers’ The Young Carers Strategy for Scotland 2010 -2015 (Scottish Government, 2010) sets out action points to be implemented through local authority education services to support young carers in schools. These will assist with identifying and supporting young carers in school settings.

Here is a list of the action points which are most pertinent to schools:

  • By 2012, if they have not already done so, local authority Education Services will wish to revisit their policies, procedures and approaches for identifying young carers in schools, to reflect the impact of current policy and legislation, including the Curriculum for Excellence and the Supporting Children’s Code of Practice.
  • By 2012, if they have not already done so, local authority Education Services will wish to explore opportunities for developing partnership working with their local schools, parents and the third sector, including young carers services in order to improve identification of and support for young carers.
  • The Scottish Government will work with the Scottish Young Carers Services Alliance to produce a practice guide on young carers for teachers and schools.
  • The Scottish Government and Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (CoSLA) will promote the use of the Toolkit to identify and support young cares in primary schools in Scotland which has been developed to assist PDF iconprimary school teachers to identify and support young carers
  • The Scottish Government and partners will respond to the recommendations coming from HMIe (now part of Education Scotland)’s review of the implementation of the Additional Support for Learning Act and its impact on young carers. 

The strategy sets out how its production dovetails with the four capacities which form the foundation of the Curriculum for Excellence and Scottish Government’s child-centric approach, Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC).

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Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA)

EMA is payable to eligible 16-19 year olds in Scotland.  

Carers of this age group who may miss school or college due to their caring responsibilities should be encouraged to let the education institution know about their family situation.  Within the new EMA guidance, young carers are recognised as being vulnerable and entitled to additional flexibility around entitlement.

Read guidance on Education Maintenance Allowance on the EMA Scotland website, specifically point 2.1.2 in the Education maintenance Allowance - Scottish Business Model (Version 14) which states that "If written confirmation has been received from the LA detailing that a young person has caring responsibilities (young carer) then flexibility should be built into the learning agreement."

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Toolkit

Working in partnership with community pharmacies in Scotland

NHS Carer Information Strategies must as a minimum demonstrate how NHS Boards are making community-based pharmacists aware of their role in supporting the Strategy.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsHealth and wellbeingPharmacy Services
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:45
Body: 

Identification of Carers by Community Pharmacists in Scotland

NHS Carer Information Strategies must as a minimum demonstrate how NHS Boards are making community-based pharmacists aware of their role in supporting the Strategy.

The Carers Trust ‘Focus on Carers’ Initiative identified successful methodologies and models of good practice to identify and support carers through joint work between community pharmacists and local Carers Centres, one of which is highlighted below.

The Princess Royal Trust Moray Carers Centre

The centre manager contacted the local pharmacist in Forres, who was very enthusiastic and briefed the pharmacy staff on the implementation of the initiative. The cards and letters were delivered to the pharmacy and the initiative got underway.

The manager contacted the pharmacy at regular intervals to update the staff on the outcomes and numbers of carers identified.

To build on this enthusiasm, the centre manager arranged with the press for articles to appear in the local newspapers promoting the initiative, including photographs of the pharmacy. This not only publicised the search for hidden carers, by raising awareness in the newspapers’ readership, but also provided an excellent incentive when introducing the idea to other pharmacists.

Successful outcomes

The outcomes were very successful for this approach. A total of 8,340 cards were handed out by the pharmacy, and produced 100 responses from carers, which is a 1.2% return.

Approximately two thirds of those carers identified asked to be included on the centre’s mailing list, whilst the remainder requested help in areas such as benefit checks and information about the law regarding disability, and how to access additional services.

Although surprised at the level of response, the centre had made sure they would be prepared, by having the initial information and resource packs ready to be sent to the carers.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Moray freepost pharmacy cardPDF icon Moray pharmacy letter
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