Wellbeing

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Educational

Supporting Young Carers in School – Wales

Designed with teachers and schools staff, this resource helps make the identification and support of young carers in schools in primary and secondary schools in Wales as easy as possible.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 09:45
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Body: 

Young Carers in Schools Wales

Welcome to Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, Wales edition.This resource has been written in association with teachers and school staff to help make the identification and support of young carers in schools as easy as possible. 

It forms part of the Young Carers in Schools programme, a free England and Wales wide initiative making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers and awarding good practice. 

Together with the programme's free tools and resources, the Step-by-step Guide will help schools achieve National Young Carer recognition.

Who is the Step-by-step Guide for?

The Step-by-step Guide is for use in secondary and primary schools in Wales but could be easily adapted for use in the rest of the UK.

Schools are well situated to support young carers and, working in partnership with other agencies, to impact positively on their lives and their education. This toolkit provides an invaluable resource to help identify and support young carers in schools across Wales, and I urge schools to take advantage of it.

Kirsty Williams,
Cabinet Secretary for Education, Welsh Government

What does the Step-by-step Guide offer your school?

Many schools are delivering exceptional practice, making a real and positive difference to the young carers they support. Other schools have told us they want to achieve these excellent outcomes, but don't know where to begin. This Step-by-step Guide sets out ten key steps to implementing effective identification and support for young carers in schools.

Like other aspects of school life, the development of effective support for young carers is reliant on regular reviews of current provision and the identification of areas for continual improvement.  The steps are therefore a cyclical process, which schools should engage with throughout the school year.

Why take part?

The Young Carers in Schools programme enables schools to:

  • Gain national recognition for raising outcomes for young carers through the Young Carers in Schools Wales programme.
  • Demonstrate to Estyn that your school is meeting the needs of young carers, specifically mentioned in the Inspection Guidance, 2016.
  • Identify manageable steps to improve educational outcomes for this vulnerable pupil group – the programme breaks down the actions schools can take so that your school can prioritise what to do next.
     

What schools have told us about the impact of the prgramme

The outcomes from implementing the Young Carers in Schools programme in England have shown some impressive  results not least in  increasing young carers confidence, wellbeing, achievement and attainment. Pilot schools in Wales so far have seen a significant increase in the number of young carers identified since being the programme.

Making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers

The Step-by-step Guide has been developed with teachers and school staff who understand the pressures that schools face to deliver the very wide range of demands placed upon them.  As a result it is designed to be as flexible and helpful as possible.

Each step is accompanied by key information and practical tools, which schools can use and adapt to suit their school structure and local circumstances. All accompanying tools will be uploaded in the coming weeks but schools can make a start by completing the baseline review

Not all schools will need to use all the tools included.  Some may find it more helpful to choose those that will help enhance the support they already offer to young carers and their families while others will want to simply start and build their activities over a number of years. 


How can your school get involved?

  • Download the Step by Step guide (below) and have a take a look at the accompanying tools (related content below)
  • Complete a Filebaseline reviewFileadolygiad o'r man cychwyn (Step 2, Tool 1) of your schools current provision for young carers to indentify strengths, weaknesses and priorities.
  • Agree actions to be taken forward with your Senior Leadership Team.
  • Contact your local authority, health board and young carers service to share your findings and see how they can support the programme.
  • Complete a pledge on the interactive Schools Map –  either in support of the Young Carers in School programme or as part of your own young carers work.
  • You can blog, help raise awareness through Young Carers Awareness Day and encourage other schools to take part in the programme through your Cluster leads.
  • Send us your contact details so we can help promote your work.

Identifying early means an improvement in achievement, attainment and wellbeing, if the right support is offered.

Phase 1

Since July 2016  Carers Trust Wales has been working with 8 pilot schools from across Wales to refine and adapt the young carers in schools programme.  The outcome of this pilot has seen huge investment of time and commitment resulting in some very clear wins for not only the schools but young carers themselves.  By working together with Estyn and Welsh Government we hope to further raise the profile of young carers within the education system to ensure their voices are heard.

Phase 2

Unlike England, the Young Carers in Schools programme in Wales is not an award scheme. The reasons for this are clear: Carers Trust Wales believes schools and young carers themselves are best placed to assess standards and challenge practice. Therefore,  we are working to develop a National Framework to support peer reviews, offering local focus, encouraging reflective practice and supporting continuous development. Pilot models are already underway in South Wales led by Carers Trust South East Wales and EAS Consortia. We believe, together is the best way to encourage and support schools to achieve better and more sustainable outcomes for young carers. An update on the Peer Review Framework will be available later this year.

Got a question about the Young Carers in Schools Wales programme?

Contact Carers Trust Wales.

 

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PDF icon Step by Step Guide WalesPDF icon Canllawiau Cam wrth gam Cymru
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Toolkit

Toolkit for Initial Teacher Education (ITE) Providers

This toolkit provides essential tools, templates and guidance for ITE providers who already include young carers as a key topic within their training programmes and ITE providers who are developing their training content regarding young carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 13:15
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PDF icon Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Toolkit for Initial Teacher Education Providers
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Children and young people’s mental health can be affected by their caring role, whether the condition of the person they care is related to physical health, mental health, an addiction or frailty in old age. 

The mental health of young carers, aged 17 or under

The evidence shows that young carers have worse mental health than their peers:

  • A survey of 348 young carers found 48% said being a young carer made them feel stressed and 44% said it made them feel tired. 
  • A survey of 61 young carers in school found that 38% had mental health problems. 
  • The 2011 Census showed that young carers providing 50+ hours of care a week were up to five times more likely to report their general health as ‘Not good’. 

The mental health of young adult carers, aged 16-25 

Young adults with caring roles report higher rates of anxiety and depression. The GP Patient Survey finds that a third more young adult carers report anxiety or depression than other young people- 39% for young adult carers, in contrast with 28% of young people without caring responsibilities.  

A Carers Trust survey of young adult carers found that 45% reported mental health problems. 

Improving the mental health of young carers and young adult carers

The Time to be Heard campaign calls for better support for young adult carers and their families to address caring roles that have a negative impact on their health, including mental health. We are also calling for local plans to improve children’s mental health services, sometimes called Local Transformation Plans, to include measures that improve the mental health of young carers and young adult carers.

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How-to Guide

Triangle of Care Toolkit - A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

This resource is designed for services implementing the Triangle of Care, it is based on what has worked and what has prevented successful implementation in other organisations. It includes guidance, tips and good practice to guide professionals and carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecialist servicesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carers
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 15:30
Body: 

Introduction

The Triangle of Care was launched in 2010 and was developed by carers who were supporting someone who regularly needed acute inpatient mental health services. It identified six key standards that if in place would mean that the carer would be better involved and supported by mental health services.

Since the launch, Carers Trust has led on the programme in England developing the original guide so that it can be implemented across all mental health services including specialist, forensic, children’s, older people’s and community.

In 2013 the Triangle of Care membership scheme was launched to enable mental health providers to receive formal recognition of their commitment to cultural change and carer involvement. Since its launch, 31 NHS trusts have joined the scheme and their experience, knowledge, good practice and pitfalls have been identified to help develop a toolkit for implementation of the Triangle of Care.

You can download the full toolkit here, or review the appropriate section online: PDF iconTriangle of Care Toolkit

The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers

The experiences of the 31 trusts who have joined the Triangle of Care membership scheme between 2013 and April 2015 have been extensive. Carers Trust has been able to identify good practice where it has been implemented which has ensured a more successful implementation of the Triangle of Care. These experiences have been collated to develop a toolkit. This toolkit aims to support trusts who are at the beginning of their Triangle of Care journey, those who are yet to begin and those who are already well progressed but want to learn from their peers and ensure a legacy of cultural change.

The toolkit focuses on the different elements that trusts should consider when implementing the Triangle of Care across their services and more information on each area can be found in the toolkit:

  • Strategic buy-in and support
  • Commissioning and reporting levers including Care Act 2014
  • Staff promotion and buy-in
  • Carer partners and Service user partners
  • Carer champions
  • What good looks like and celebrating good practice
  • A willingness to be honest and encouraging the value of honesty and frequently asked questions

These elements have been identified as important to successful implementation if they are in place. While not all the elements are in place in all trusts many trusts do have a majority in place and this has helped their journey be more successful.

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PDF icon The Triangle of Care Toolkit – A Resource for Mental Health Service Providers
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Guidance

Flu vaccinations for carers: Guidance for community pharmacy teams

Now that carers can have a free NHS flu jab at their local pharmacy, Carers Trust has produced a range of resources to help pharmacy teams identify carers and offer them support.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers services
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 09:15
Body: 

Why should carers have a flu jab?

When you’re looking after someone who’s old or disabled and unable to get by without your help, catching the flu can be catastrophic. That’s why unpaid carers are eligible for a free NHS flu jab, providing they receive Carer's Allowance or are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare would be at risk if the carer was ill. Once a carer's been vaccinated against the flu, they're also less likely to pass the virus on to the person they care for, who could become seriously ill as a result.

Most carers have been missing out so far

Even though carers have been eligible for a free NHS flu jab for several years, last season only 174,522 of England’s 5,430,000 unpaid carers were vaccinated against the flu by their GP practice. In fact, only 386,898 people were recorded by their GP practice as being a carer. But now that carers can have a flu jab at their local pharmacy, the hope is that many more will be identified, vaccinated and supported in future. Here’s how you can help.

Follow the 60-second Flu Chat 

To help busy pharmacy teams identify carers quickly and easily, Carers Trust has produced a PDF icon'60-second Carers Flu Chat' which suggests how you can engage someone you think might be a carer in a quick conversation about why they should consider getting vaccinated. The script also suggests that you offer to let the carer’s GP practice know that they're a carer when you notify the practice that they've been vaccinated.

Wider support

You’ll notice that the Flu Chat also suggests that you give carers some information to read about their local carers service which they may find useful. You could also give the carer a leaflet with details of the services your pharmacy can provide such as repeat prescriptions, home deliveries and MURs. Another option is to give carers a copy of Carers Trust's booklet, PDF iconA Carer's Guide to Managing Medicines

Supporting carers in a nutshell

Along with the 60-second Flu Chat, we’ve also produced a PDF iconone-page infographic with key information on protecting carers from the flu. As with the Flu Chat, we recommend you give a copy of the infographic to every member of your team and put it on the wall in your staff room to encourage the whole team to ‘think carer’. And if you'd like to broaden and strengthen your knowledge of carers further still, check out the Carers Floor in the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education's LearningPharmacy. PSNC has also produced some guidance on supporting carers which you may find useful. 

Promoting the service to carers

PSNC has produced a pharmacy PDF iconflu vaccination poster specifically aimed at carers.

Any questions?

If you have any questions about supporting carers or any feedback you’re happy to share, please email primarycare@carers.org. You’ll also find a wide range of information for carers on Carers Trust’s main website.  

TEN SIGNS THAT TELL COMMUNITY PHARMACY TEAMS THAT SOMEONE MAY BE A CARER

Carers are often the people who:-

  1. Drop off and collect prescriptions for another person.
  2. Collect medications for someone who has a condition (e.g. dementia) which suggests that they wouldn't be able to get by on their own.
  3. Buy incontinence products or other items associated with ill health, frailty or disability.
  4. Ask for advice about someone else’s medication, health condition or disability rather than their own.
  5. Sit in on a Medicines Use Review and give the impression that they are main 'manager' of your patient's medications.
  6. May seem to be in a hurry to get back home because they don't want to leave someone on their own for very long.
  7. Visit the pharmacy with someone who appears to need their support. 
  8. May look tired, depressed or anxious when the person they usually accompany isn't with them. 
  9. Take delivery of medications from the pharmacy delivery driver.
  10. Regularly buy over-the-counter medicines for another person.
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Guidance

Young Carer Assessment Tools

Local authorities must offer an assessment where it appears that a child is involved in providing care. Here are some examples of assessment tools that could form part of an overall whole family approach to assessment.
Area of Care: 
Primary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Information and adviceCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carersFamilies
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 - 09:00
Body: 
The Children and Families Act 2014 amended the Children Act to make it easier for young carers to get an assessment of their needs and to introduce ‘whole family’ approaches to assessment and support. Local authorities must offer an assessment where it appears that a child is involved in providing care. Here are some examples of assessment tools that could make up a part of an overall whole family approach to assessment. This guidance has been compiled by Carers Trust and The Children's Society as part of the Making a step change: Putting it into practice programme.

MACA YC-18: Multidimensional Assessment of Caring Activities

The MACA is a questionnaire to be completed by young carers that can be used as an indicator of the total amount of caring activity undertaken by a child or young person, as well as six subscale scores for: 
  1. Domestic tasks
  2. Household management
  3. Personal care
  4. Emotional care
  5. Sibling care
  6. Financial/practical care.

PANOC YC-20: Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring 

The Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring (PANOC-YC20) is a questionnaire to be completed by young carers that can be used to provide an index (or score) of the subjective cognitive and emotional impact of caring in young people.

Common Assessment Framework (CAF)

The CAF is a nationally standardised approach to conducting an assessment of the needs of a child or young person and deciding how those needs should be met. The CAF will promote more effective, earlier identification of children’s additional needs and improve multi-agency working. It is intended to provide a simple, non-bureaucratic process for a holistic assessment of a child’s needs, taking account of the individual, family and community.
More information on the CAF can be found in the PDF iconCAF Simplified Assessment Workstream

Outcomes Star 

Outcomes StarThe Outcomes Star™ both measures and supports progress towards self-reliance or other goals on multiple key areas such as health, caring role, relationships, feelings and behaviours, education and learning, etc. Different versions of the Star include the Carers Star, My Star and the Family Star. Each star is used to capture the voice of the young carer and their family, their needs, and their perspective on the changes they are experiencing.

My Life Now Wheel

My Life Now WheelMy Life Now is an individual Assessment and Planning Tool for Young Carers. The tools include both an in depth and quick assessment wheel and a framework for setting goals.

 

 

The YCRG screening tool (YC-QST-20)

The questions in the Screening Tool have been cognitively tested in the DfE national study of young carers (with young carers themselves) and in YCRG research over many years. The tool and explanatory model are also currently being used in other countries (Japan, US) to help both researchers and practitioners identify young carers and their needs.

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PDF icon Manual for Measures of Caring Activities and Outcomes For Children and Young People 2nd EditionPDF icon CAF - Simplified Assessment Workstream
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Guidance

Triangle of Care for Dementia

The Triangle of Care for Dementia was developed in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing and in consultation with carers, people with dementia and professionals. It is based on the original Triangle of Care and is aimed at acute care hospitals.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care

In 2013 Carers Trust worked with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) to adapt the Triangle of Care to meet the needs of carers of people with dementia when the person they cared for was adapted to a general hospital. A stakeholder day was held where carers, people with dementia and professionals were consulted and provided feedback on the Triangle of Care. 

Carers Trust and the RCN worked together in 2016 to update the guide.

The new guide and self assessment tool were launched in November 2016, this is specifically aimed at acute hospital wards and services where a person with dementia may be admitted but their dementia is not the reason for their admission.

The guide is to enable professionals to look at how they can identify and support carers ensuring that the person with dementia is included and receives the best care outcomes as well as positive outcomes for the carer.

PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice in Dementia Care.pdf

FileTriangle of Care for Dementia Self-Assessment Tool (Word Version)

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland

To reflect the Scottish context, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to suit the Scottish legislation, initiatives and policies around dementia. The Scottish version has been a collaborative effort between Carers Trust Scotland, Royal College of Nursing Scotland, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, University of
Stirling Dementia Services Research and Dementia Carers Voices.

 PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland.pdf.

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care, Wales Edition

In Wales, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to reflect Welsh legislation, good practice examples and policies around dementia in secondary care. The Wales edition has been funded by the Royal College of Nursing and adapted for use in Wales by Carers Trust Wales.

 

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Toolkit

Step 10: Sharing Good Practice with Others

This step, taken from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, aims to help schools share good practice in identifying and supporting young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, February 24, 2017 - 18:30
Body: 

It is vital that schools that have adopted Steps 1 to 9 of this Step-by-step Guide, share their good practice and lessons learnt with feeder and linked schools including others in their school cluster or multi academy trust.

By doing so they will ensure positive outcomes are delivered for young carers attending other schools. They will also make it more likely that the caring role of pupils enrolling or transferring to their school is identified by others prior to the pupil’s transition. This will make it easier for schools to implement support and early intervention.

Identifying a young carer early can stop them taking on caring roles which are excessive or inappropriate. Make sure no child or young person’s education, wellbeing and potential is affected by their caring role, by sharing your good practice today.  

Sharing good practice with schools is PDF iconStep 10 from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-Teaching Staff. The steps from this guide are designed to be used in order.

Schools should seek opportunities to share effective practice by:

  • Disseminating learning with feeder and linked schools, including others in their school cluster or multi-academy trust through transition planning, joint training, mail outs and other information forums
  • Participating in the regional networks organised by the Young Carers in Schools programme. The regional networks bring together schools, young carers services and other agencies to share expertise and access training. Opportunities are available online and face-to-face to make sure everyone can get the most out of these networks

Tools

FileStep 10, Tool 1: Sharing good practice - A case study example

What to do next? 

The development of effective support for young carers in schools is a reiterative process of continual improvement.  Schools should review their provision at least annually. Reviews should be timetabled at appropriate points within the school calendar so that they:

  • Inform the school’s processes for planning and reviewing its use of Pupil Premium funding.
  • Ensure that where appropriate young carers are considered as part of the whole school development plan. 

For guidance and tools to support schools to review their provision return to Step 2: Reviewing your school's provision for young carers.

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Toolkit

Step 9: Identifying, Assessing and Supporting Young Carers and their Families

This step, taken from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, sets out the key actions that schools should follow when they identify a pupil who is, or may be, a young carer.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, February 24, 2017 - 14:30
Body: 

Without supportive teachers I wouldn't have continued my academic career in the way that I have...I really do thank them. 
Young carer

Each time the school identifies a pupil as a young carer, the Young Carers School Operational Lead should ensure a number of key actions are taken to:

  • Assess the needs of this pupil and of their family.
  • Secure consent for information to be shared.
  • Establish the involvement of staff and other professionals to plan and implement support.
  • Develop and agree pupil plans/provision maps.
  • Deliver support.
  • Monitor and review impact on the young carer and their family

PDF iconStep 9: Identifying, Assessing and Supporting Young Carers and their Familiescategories these key actions into those you should take to deliver a basic level of provision for young carers, to move beyond the basics, and to achieve best practice.

This step is taken from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-Teaching Staff. The steps from this guide are designed to be used in order.

Tools 

Tools available to support schools undertake the actions, set out in Step 9: Identifying, Assessing and Supporting Young Carers and their Families, include: 

Next step 

Go to Step 10: Sharing good practice with others.

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Step 8: Raising Awareness of Pupils and Families About Young Carers

This step, taken from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, supports schools to raise the awareness of pupils and families about young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, February 24, 2017 - 15:30
Body: 
I really enjoy learning about young carers and their life and would like to learn a lot more just in case it ever happens to me.
A pupil

To counteract the reasons why many young carers are hidden schools will need to proactively raise the awareness of pupils and their families about: 

  • What it means to be a young carer.
  • Disabilities, mental and physical ill-health, and alcohol and substance misuse issues with a focus on dispelling common stereotypes. 

Raising awareness in these areas can help pupils and their families self-identify as a young carer and help remove the stigma associated with certain disabilities, illness and alcohol and substance misuse, thus helping to prevent bullying.

PDF iconStep 8: Raising Awareness of Pupils and Families about Young Carers provides key information about the ways schools can raise awareness of pupils and families about young carers.

This step is taken from Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-Teaching Staff. The steps from this guide are designed to be used in order.

I used to help out in the classroom occasionally and this was seen as a positive experience for children who have never met a wheelchair user before.  The school also invited other disabled speakers to talk to the children from time to time.
Parent

Tools 

Tools available to support Young Carers’ School Operational Leads include: 

The Young Carers’ School Operational Lead may also wish to download and use FileStep 5,Tool 1: Recommended points to include in a whole school commitmentto create a whole school commitment to young carers to display on staff noticeboards and the intranet.

Next step 

Once you have raised the awareness of pupils and families about young carer issues, go to Step 9: Identifying, assessing and supporting young carers in schools. 

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