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Universities supporting students with caring responsibilities

View details of Universities in the UK who have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

This is a list of Universities in the UK that have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities. If you would like to contribute what your university does for students with caring responsibilities to this list, contact Carers Trust

Please note, this does not claim to be a comprehensive list of universities who have implemented specific support for carers. Furthermore, Carers Trust has not checked or vetted the support promoted here by universities.

Initiatives supporting young adult carers at universities

The University of Birmingham 

Young Adult Carers Event:  2 April 2015 

This event, hosted by the University of Birmingham, was designed for young adult carers to discover and learn about university and student life. 

University lead contact for student carers: Jane Patel - call 0121 414 8489. 

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The University of Nottingham

Outreach and taster days for young adult carers

The University of Nottingham hosts outreach and taster day activities for young adult carer groups from around the Midlands. 

Student Support for those with caring responsibilities 

The Student Support Team at the University of Nottingham has a dedicated contact for students with caring responsibilities, Carole East. Students are welcome to contact Carole directly, her contact details are: carole.east@nottingham.ac.uk or 0115 9514471.

University lead contact for student carers: Emma Szembek - call 0115 8466468 or Daisy Throup - call 0115 8467336.  

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The University of Winchester

Specific outreach to young carers and young adult carers

  • The University of Winchester runs an annual residential for young adult carers aged 14+ living in the county of Hampshire.
  • The University hosts taster days for young adult carers aged 14+.
  • The University engages in partnership work with young carers projects around Hampshire as part of its widening participation work and to support young carers with life skills and career choices.
  • The University recruits young adult carer students as Higher Education Ambassadors for the University. 
  • Visit the University young carers page.

Multi-agency partnership working for young carers and young adult carers

The University of Winchester contributes annually to the Young Carers Festival organised by The Children’s Society. 

Visit the University young adults carers page.  

Compact Scheme

The University of Winchester specifically includes in its Compact Scheme, with local colleges and sixth forms, students ‘who have caring responsibilities’ or who have ‘a disrupted pattern of education’ or who have ‘problems relating to health, disability or bereavement’, among other criteria.

Postgraduate financial support for young adult carers

The University of Winchester of Winchester has a Postgraduate Access Scholarship Scheme (PASS). The scholarship provides a 20% discount on tuition fees for a number of groups including a “carer for a family member with long-term ill-health or disability”.

University lead contact for student carers: Dr Terri Sandison - call 01962 827225 or Joanne Gale-Chambers - call 01962 624890.

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York St John University

Partnership work with York Carers Centre

York St John University works closely with York Carers Centre to support young adult carers. This includes a York Carers Centre stall at Fresher’s Fair and information stalls throughout the year.

University lead contact for student carers: Anna Herbert - call 01904 876408 or Vanesa Emslie - call 01904 876970.#

De Montford University (DMU)

DMU recognises that students with caring responsibilities may have additional support needs. It has set up a webpage of useful information and contacts for student carers and encourage any student with a caring role to contact one of the designated staff for student carers.   

University lead contacts for student carers:

  • Melissa Page, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7872
  • Ryan Ward, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7605
  • Email: transitions@dmu.ac.uk

 
DMU organises university experience days for student carers which involves taster sessions, campus and accommodation tours and meeting current students.
 
The university is part of local networks including those run by Leicester City Council and Barnardos. It also has five UNITE Foundation Scholarships which offer free accommodation in a Unite hall of residence for three years. Student carers are a priority group for this award.  
 
For further information please contact Melissa Page.

Sheffield Hallam University

Information about support for student carers at the university is available on its website.

Pre-entry support

The Compact scheme provides extra support to students who face barriers to progressing to university due to having caring responsibilities (amongst other circumstances). Contact the Compact team on 0114 225 4231 or email.

On course support for student carers

University lead contacts for student carers – Robin Kerr and Lynette Granger, call 0114 225 3813 or email.

  • Ring round of new student carers to check how students are settling in, resolve any issues and refer to appropriate support services. Targeted emails are also sent to raise awareness of relevant opportunities and support services.
  • Information and advice pages for student carers – dedicated pages for student carers are included on the Student Advice and Information blog. Robin and Lynette also post articles on the blog about their work with student carers.
  • One-to-one advice for student carers – Robin and Lynette are happy to see any student on a one-to-one basis to discuss their caring role, give information and advice about university life and provide supported referrals to local carer organisations
  • Partnership work with local carers’ organisations – Robin and Lynette have made close links with local carer organisations to help support student carers.
  • Staff from Sheffield Carers Centre and Sheffield Young Carers’Project have also delivered training to staff in student facing roles across the university.

Financial support for students with caring responsibilities

Students with caring responsibilities who may need extra financial support because they have higher than expected costs or they have a sudden financial emergency are eligible to make an application to the Sheffield Hallam Student Support Fund. Further information is available from Student Funding and Access Support on 0114 225 3813 or via email

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University of Manchester

For more information visit the University of Manchester student carers webpage or contact Jessica Nightingale on 0161 275 2987.

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Student Carers in Higher Education

This resource will enable universities and services supporting young adult carers to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to access and succeed in higher education.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 16:15
Body: 

For a young person who has caring responsibilities, trying to transition to, through and beyond university can be extremely challenging and for some a barrier.

Carers Trust, with the support of The National Union of Students and the National Network of Universities Supporting Young Adult Carers, has published a new guide:

This resource will enable universities and services supporting young adult carers, to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to access and succeed in higher education.

The resource: 

  • Draws together some of the good practice universities have already begun to develop.
  • Makes recommendations for how universities can support students across the student life cycle.
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Student Carers in Further Education

Carers Trust in partnership with NIACE has published a new guide to support students with caring responsibilities in further education colleges.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 15:30
Body: 

This new resource will enable further education colleges to gain a greater understanding of the challenges that this group of students face and how they can be better supported to remain and succeed in further education.

PDF iconSupporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Colleges and Services to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed in Further Education

“If I was told that I couldn’t have my phone on I would just leave college – my mum needs to be able to contact me quickly in an emergency.”
Young adult carer (taken from the Top tips for colleges and college staff supporting student carers section of the guide)

Who is the resource for?

This practical resource is designed for use by managers and staff working in further education colleges and carers services supporting young and young adult carers.

The resource: 

  • Increases awareness and understanding of young adult carers and their specific needs.
  • Outlines who young adult carers are, the challenges they face and how their caring roles can impact on their education.
  • Draws together some of the good practice that is already being developed in some colleges.
  • Makes recommendations for how student carers can be supported to sustain their participation in learning, achieve their potential and succeed.
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Protecting Young Carers from Bullying

Protecting Young Carers from Bullying: A Guide for Schools, Community Groups and Policy Makers
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 14:30
Body: 

This guide is aimed at all professionals who work with young people and are therefore likely to come across young carers. It aims to raise the awareness and understanding of the relationship between being a young carer and bullying, in order that proactive steps can be taken to help prevent young carers from being bullied.

Further information

Download the Carers Trust resource – PDF iconProtecting Young Carers from Bullying a Guide for Schools Community Groups and Policy Makers

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About Time Grant Evaluations

Following the successful delivery of two About Time Grant programmes, Time for Change and Take Action and Support which addressed issues that can lead to young adult carers becoming disengaged from society, independent evaluations of the two programmes have been produced.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illness
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Primary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, February 12, 2018 - 10:00
Body: 

Key points: 

The objectives of the evaluations were to:
  • Provide an overall evaluation of all data to assess the progress of funded projects against the aims and objectives of the About Time grant programmes and of the wider About Time programme.
  • Conduct a qualitative study with funded projects to identify effective strategies and approaches for supporting and enabling young adult carers.
  • Provide a focused evaluation of data derived from outcomes measurement tools designed to measure the extent of care undertaken, the positive and negative impacts of caring for young adult carers and changes in their lives because of taking part in the funded intervention.
  • Evaluate the impacts of programme delivery and Carers Trust grant making processes on funded organisations.

About Time evaluations

The evaluations of the Time for Change and Take Action and Support grant programmes were structured in three phases and each had its own evaluation report with an overview of the whole programme also produced.

Phase one: February–October 2015

 

Phase two: November 2015–November 2016

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015 to November 2016 Executive Summary PDF (177 KB)

PDF iconAbout Time Grant Programmes Evaluation Report Phase 2 November 2015  to November 2016 PDF (323 KB)

Phase three: December 2016–October 2017

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 Executive Summary PDF (251 KB)

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Report Phase 3 December 2016 to October 2017 PDF (483 KB)

Overview Report

PDF icon About Time Grant Programme Evaluation Overview Report PDF (519 KB)

Key achievements and learning from the programmes include:

  • Around 7,200 young adult carers have benefited from 114 projects delivered by Carers Trust Network Partners, exceeding the original target of 6,200 young adult carers.
  • Programmes provided support to significant numbers of young adult carers for the first time, with over half of the young people participating being new to Carers Trust Network Partners.
  • Programmes developed a flexible response to the needs of young adult carers, including individual support, group activities and access to small grants for individuals, alongside the development of partnerships.
  • The programme design involved young adult carers and Network Partners, ensuring programmes reflected specific needs across UK.
  • Projects have been successful in reaching a representative group of young adult carers and there was a good geographic spread of projects across the UK.
  • Carers Trust has enabled Network Partners to deliver effective projects by being flexible about delivery approaches and providing good quality support, information and training.
  • The Carers Trust Network has a unique role in supporting the needs of young adult carers.
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Supporting Young Carers in School – Wales

Designed with teachers and schools staff, this resource helps make the identification and support of young carers in schools in primary and secondary schools in Wales as easy as possible.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 09:45
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Body: 

Young Carers in Schools Wales

Welcome to Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, Wales edition.This resource has been written in association with teachers and school staff to help make the identification and support of young carers in schools as easy as possible. 

It forms part of the Young Carers in Schools programme, a free England and Wales wide initiative making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers and awarding good practice. 

Together with the programme's free tools and resources, the Step-by-step Guide will help schools achieve National Young Carer recognition.

Who is the Step-by-step Guide for?

The Step-by-step Guide is for use in secondary and primary schools in Wales but could be easily adapted for use in the rest of the UK.

Schools are well situated to support young carers and, working in partnership with other agencies, to impact positively on their lives and their education. This toolkit provides an invaluable resource to help identify and support young carers in schools across Wales, and I urge schools to take advantage of it.

Kirsty Williams,
Cabinet Secretary for Education, Welsh Government

What does the Step-by-step Guide offer your school?

Many schools are delivering exceptional practice, making a real and positive difference to the young carers they support. Other schools have told us they want to achieve these excellent outcomes, but don't know where to begin. This Step-by-step Guide sets out ten key steps to implementing effective identification and support for young carers in schools.

Like other aspects of school life, the development of effective support for young carers is reliant on regular reviews of current provision and the identification of areas for continual improvement.  The steps are therefore a cyclical process, which schools should engage with throughout the school year.

Why take part?

The Young Carers in Schools programme enables schools to:

  • Gain national recognition for raising outcomes for young carers through the Young Carers in Schools Wales programme.
  • Demonstrate to Estyn that your school is meeting the needs of young carers, specifically mentioned in the Inspection Guidance, 2016.
  • Identify manageable steps to improve educational outcomes for this vulnerable pupil group – the programme breaks down the actions schools can take so that your school can prioritise what to do next.
     

What schools have told us about the impact of the prgramme

The outcomes from implementing the Young Carers in Schools programme in England have shown some impressive  results not least in  increasing young carers confidence, wellbeing, achievement and attainment. Pilot schools in Wales so far have seen a significant increase in the number of young carers identified since being the programme.

Making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers

The Step-by-step Guide has been developed with teachers and school staff who understand the pressures that schools face to deliver the very wide range of demands placed upon them.  As a result it is designed to be as flexible and helpful as possible.

Each step is accompanied by key information and practical tools, which schools can use and adapt to suit their school structure and local circumstances. All accompanying tools will be uploaded in the coming weeks but schools can make a start by completing the baseline review

Not all schools will need to use all the tools included.  Some may find it more helpful to choose those that will help enhance the support they already offer to young carers and their families while others will want to simply start and build their activities over a number of years. 


How can your school get involved?

  • Download the Step by Step guide (below) and have a take a look at the accompanying tools (related content below)
  • Complete a Filebaseline reviewFileadolygiad o'r man cychwyn (Step 2, Tool 1) of your schools current provision for young carers to indentify strengths, weaknesses and priorities.
  • Agree actions to be taken forward with your Senior Leadership Team.
  • Contact your local authority, health board and young carers service to share your findings and see how they can support the programme.
  • Complete a pledge on the interactive Schools Map –  either in support of the Young Carers in School programme or as part of your own young carers work.
  • You can blog, help raise awareness through Young Carers Awareness Day and encourage other schools to take part in the programme through your Cluster leads.
  • Send us your contact details so we can help promote your work.

Identifying early means an improvement in achievement, attainment and wellbeing, if the right support is offered.

Phase 1

Since July 2016  Carers Trust Wales has been working with 8 pilot schools from across Wales to refine and adapt the young carers in schools programme.  The outcome of this pilot has seen huge investment of time and commitment resulting in some very clear wins for not only the schools but young carers themselves.  By working together with Estyn and Welsh Government we hope to further raise the profile of young carers within the education system to ensure their voices are heard.

Phase 2

Unlike England, the Young Carers in Schools programme in Wales is not an award scheme. The reasons for this are clear: Carers Trust Wales believes schools and young carers themselves are best placed to assess standards and challenge practice. Therefore,  we are working to develop a National Framework to support peer reviews, offering local focus, encouraging reflective practice and supporting continuous development. Pilot models are already underway in South Wales led by Carers Trust South East Wales and EAS Consortia. We believe, together is the best way to encourage and support schools to achieve better and more sustainable outcomes for young carers. An update on the Peer Review Framework will be available later this year.

Got a question about the Young Carers in Schools Wales programme?

Email: Gill Winter, Carers Partnership Manager, Carers Trust Wales.

 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Step by Step Guide WalesPDF icon Canllawiau Cam wrth gam Cymru
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Anti Bullying Resource – Being Me

Bullying can be a big issue for young carers and can have a major impact on their self-confidence and self-esteem. "Being Me" will equip teachers to work with pupils to tackle bullying in a fresh way.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeing
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 13:45
Body: 

Carers Trust has teamed up with national anti-bullying charity Kidscape, as well as Diversity Role Models, Potential Plus UK and The National Autistic Society - charities representing children who are at the end of an unacceptable level of bullying in Britain's schools today, to develop Being Me.

Better understanding

Being Me is a series of resources designed to give children across the UK an insight into the life of their classmate, and a better understanding of what it is like to be them.

Originally designed for National Anti-Bullying Week's drive to stop bullying and to celebrate difference, this new unique school resource includes a specific section on young carers. 

Download resources

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PDF icon Being me - supporting young carers in your class
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The role of school nurses in supporting young carers

School nurses play an important role in identifying school aged young carers both in and out of education. Public health nurses can play an important role in identifying and supporting families where there may be a child or young person caring or who could become a carer.
Area of Care: 
Physical illnessPrimary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 10:00
Body: 

The school nurse can play a key role in identifying young carers at an early stage, protecting their health and wellbeing and ensuring that they and their families are linked into and receiving further support from other services that they may need.

Supported by Carers Trust, several of its Network Partners and young adult carers involved in the Time to Be Heard campaign, the Department of Health have developed several strands of work for young carers:

Supporting the health and wellbeing of young carers

The Pathway Supporting the health and wellbeing of young carers is designed to support integrated working between the school nursing service, other public health nurses and partners in supporting young carers and their families. It sets out the rationale for effective partnership working recognising the need to offer support within a school and community context.

The pathway provides a model for a coordinated approach between school nursing, education, local authorities and young carers’ services, to ensure early identification of health and wellbeing needs and the provision of primary healthcare services to young carers and their families.

Young Carer School Nurse Champions

To complement the Pathway, school nurses across England are being trained to become Young Carer School Nurse Champions to give them a strong understanding of the pressures young carers face and how to ensure they receive the care they need.

On completion of the training, school nurses receive the Champion badge which will clearly identify to young carers those school nurses who have undergone training. To strengthen their role, a PDF iconSchool nurse champions charter has also been developed that sets out key messages and specific roles of a School Nurse Champion.

Work is also underway with the Department of Health to link up young carers’ services with their local school nurse.

School nurses community

Visit the Royal College of Nursing's School nurses' community website, that includes information about young carers in schools and "Meet the School Nurse Carer Champions".

Royal College of Nursing online learning resource

RCN Learning has a resource which aims to help school nurses and their teams to support young carers. It may also be of interest to children’s community nurses and health visitors.

Downloads: 
PDF icon School Nurse Champions Charter
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