Good Practice

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Good Practice

Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed In Further Education in Wales

A Wales-specific, user-friendly resource, this toolkit was developed in partnership with Learning and Work Institute to increase awareness of student carers and their specific needs, promote existing good practice from colleges and carers services and offering expert recommendations.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 10:45
Body: 

Student Carers in Further Education

In 2015 Carers Trust worked with the National Institute for Adults Continuing Education (NIACE) to develop a practical resource for colleges. In 2017 Carers Trust Wales and Learning and Work Institute worked together to develop Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Resource for Further Education Providers to Help Young Adult Carers Succeed in Further Education in Wales, drawing on good practice from colleges and carers centres across Wales. 

This interactive resource has been designed to generate momentum for identifying and supporting student carers within colleges. We hope that it will inspire and assist all colleges to build on good practice to develop their own approaches to identifying and supporting this student group. In doing so, this will ensure that students who are caring for others - students whom, in many instances, will have overcome very difficult circumstances and have aquired valuable transferable skills along the way - are able to reach their potential and successfully achieve their educational aims. 

Feedback

Carers Trust Wales will be contacting colleges across Wales in September 2018 for feedback on the implementation on the toolkit.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Supporting Students with Caring Responsibilities: A Good Practice GuidePDF icon Cefnogi Myfyrwyr a chanddynt Gyfrifoldebau Gofal: Canllaw Arfer Da
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Good Practice

Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event

Carers Trust hosted the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event in November 2014. The event brought together over 100 professionals from across the sector who work to identify and support carers across primary care.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carers
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

Carers Trust hosted the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event in November 2014. This annual event was funded by the Department of Health as part of the wider Supporting Carers in Primary Care programme. 

The large scale event brought together over 100 professionals from across the sector who work to identify and support carers across primary care. 

The day provided an excellent opportunity for sharing information and good practice and the additional networking hour at the end of the day provided the ideal opportunity for delegates to reflect on what they had learnt together. The  evaluation feedback demonstrates that delegates found the day both informative and useful.

The programme

Rick Bolton, who cares for his four-year-old son led the day, sharing his account of what being a carer means to him. Delegates heard from a variety of expert speakers including Wendy Nicholson, Professional Office for School and Community Nursing at the Department of Health, Jen Kenwood, Head of Patient Experience – Community, Primary and Integrated Care at NHS England and Moira Fraser, former Interim CEO and Director of Policy at Carers Trust, as well as taking part in a selection of workshops. 

View the presentations

The event presentations will be useful for staff from carers services and other organisations who support carers in primary care.  You can also preview what was covered in the workshops. 

Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event – view the presentations

 

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Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event – presentations

View the presentations from the Supporting Carers in Primary Care Learning Event that Carers Trust hosted in November 2014.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carers
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

These presentations will be useful for  staff from carers services and other organisations who support carers in primary care.  You can also preview what was covered in the workshops. 

Morning plenary presentations 

Policymaking to primary care practice making it happen at the sharp end (Moira Fraser, former Interim CEO and Head of Policy, Carers Trust)

Moira Fraser explained that much needs to be done to turn the rhetoric into reality and overcome the barriers facing carers organisations working with the NHS to identify carers. 

Cosying up: how CCGs can partner carers (Dr Michael Taylor, Lead GP for Carers Services at Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale CCG)

Find out which strategies Dr Michael Taylor recommends to improve support for carers by working in partnership with CCGs.

RCGPs supporting carers in general practice programme (Dr Nazia Mohammed, Clinical Champion for Carers, RCGP)

Dr Nazia Mohammed provided an overview of the College’s work to improve carer identification and support in general practice.

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Morning workshops 

Delegates were able to choose between the following morning workshops:  

How to network effectively across the health economy to maximise support for carers (Michelle Pilling Lay, Advisor Quality & Patient Experience, East Lancashire CCG)

An overview of the current landscape in health and the opportunities to maximise the impact of the Primary Care Identification Worker.

GP audits and GP investors in carers standard accreditation (Louise Shaw, Primary Care Lead & Carer Assessment Support worker and Hazel Wright, Adult Services Manager, Northampton Carers)  

Outlines the successes and challenges of co-produced primary care Interface work over five years with specific focus on the implementation of annual audits and the launch of Northamptonshire Investors in Carers Standard accreditation.   

Developing and maintaining a carers links network in Salford (Julia Ellis, former Development Manager for Primary Care and Outreach, Carers Trust)

Provides an overview of the successful and well-established Carers Links Network in Salford. Learn how the service that provides 300 referrals per annum from the primary care sector was established, developed and maintained.

Effective monitoring and evaluation tools to assess the impact of emotional support services for carers (Clare Edwards, Carer Health Worker, West Cumbria Carers)

Explores how to effectively assess the impact of services in supporting carers’ mental wellbeing using questionnaires developed by NICE.  

We also held a workshop on young carers which was  led by Rick Bolton, Dr Nazia Mohammed and Daniel Phelps. It was agreed we all need to work together to generate a culture of change and focus on developing good long term relationships to encourage lengthy engagement. Solutions discussed included:

  • A whole family approach - ensuring young carers are identified when parents present with chronic illness for example.
  • GP awareness training - the same read code would be used for young carers as adult carers.
  • Remembering that primary care is much wider than GP surgeries.
  • NHS employees’ awareness training.
  • Continued identification through schools / colleges.
  • Identifying young carers early through health visitors and children’s centres.
  • Importance of relationships such as a long-term relationship between pharmacy staff and families.
  • Professionals having the awareness of young carers and the confidence to ask appropriate questions.
  • Important to find champions with passion to drive work forward in own establishments.

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Afternoon plenary presentations

Community pharmacy - how can it help support carers (Alastair Buxton, Head of NHS Services at PSNC) 

Describes the community pharmacy services which can support carers and the Carers Trust / Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee pilot to test carer identification in community pharmacies in England.

Supporting the health and wellbeing of carers (Wendy Nicholson, Professional Officer for School and Community Nursing at the Department of Health)

Demonstrates that community nurses are keen to extend their understanding of carers’ needs and to ensure carers’ wellbeing needs are met.

Further guidance on supporting adult carers through community nursing can be found on the Supporting adult carers through community nursing page.

NHS England commitment to carers - can it make a difference (Jen Kenwood, Head of Patient Experience – Community, Primary and Integrated Care, NHS England)

Described NHS England’s commitment to carers, which comprises 37 commitments spread across eight key priorities, from raising the profile of carers to person-centred coordinated care. 

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Afternoon workshops

Delegates were able to choose between the following afternoon workshops:

The carers health team: a methodology to prevent carers falling between the gaps in our systems (Geoff Coleman, Chief Executive, Crossroads Care South Central)

Explored using a collaborative approach to support carers involving a partnership between Crossroads Care, Carers Health Team (NHS) and Carers Support West Sussex.

Carer awareness training for pharmacies (Anne Cole, Regional Manager South West, CPPE)

A guide to the new carer-awareness training resources for pharmacy teams co-produced by the Centre For Pharmacy Postgraduate Education (CPPE) and Carers Trust to improve the identification and referral of carers and how this fits into the Carer Friendly Pharmacy Pilot.

Supporting carers through integrated care (Helen Brown, Health Development Lead Carers Resource, Harrogate) 

Evidences the value of providing support for carers by establishing a service for carers within Integrated Care Teams. It highlights the success of the service in identifying and reaching out to ‘hidden’ carers and the benefits to all the multi-disciplinary professionals involved.

Supporting carers through e-learning for community nurses (Jennie Whitford – Carers Project Manager, QNI) 

Explores the digital Carers Resource for community nurses which has been developed by The Queen's Nursing Institute in collaboration with nurses working in the community.

 

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Good Practice

The Carers Star

The Carers Star is a holistic and collaborative tool, designed for use in services that support carers one-to-one over a period of time.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarers in employment
I work in: 
Carers services
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 15:00
Body: 

The Carers Star helps services to assess carers’ quality of life and identify the support they need to continue caring. It also supports services to capture and evidence outcomes for carers and to engage carers in the process of change. Part of the family of Outcomes Star tools, it’s a tried and tested framework to assist services and commissioners in supporting carers more effectively.

How it works

The Carers Star is a holistic and collaborative tool, designed for use in services that support carers one-to-one over a period of time. It covers seven areas where carers often need support, including confidence in their caring role, balancing caring with work or time to relax, and finances.

Underpinning these scales is a ‘Journey of Change’ – five stages carers go through as they improve their lives, moving from ‘cause for concern’ up to ‘as good as it can be’. This gives a measure of progress, or distance travelled, and a set of manageable steps carers can take to become more independent.

Workers in services that support carers (both third sector and public sector) use the Carers Star at assessment and subsequent reviews to find out where a carer is on their journey and to plan appropriate actions to help them move up each scale.

All workers using the Carers Star need appropriate training and support to realise the benefits described below for commissioners, services and carers.

Supporting commissioners

The Carers Star helps local authority commissioners fulfil the requirements of the Care Act by providing a framework for effective assessment, action planning and review, combined with the ability to measure the impact of interventions in a way that is clear to everyone. It also supports services in undertaking preventative work with carers.

Carers Star data is easily collated using the Star Online web application or other IT systems, so services can report on outcomes for carers, examining both the big picture and the detail. Reports cover the key outcomes of interest to commissioners, using a consistent format and facilitating learning across different services.

Because the Carers Star is an integral part of assessment, support, planning and review, it doesn’t divert valuable resources from direct work with carers, making it popular with both workers and the people they support. It can also help improve the quality and consistency of support provided. 

“Not only is this a useful tool for assessment and identification of needs, its use over time can demonstrate to commissioners that they are getting the right outcomes from the services they fund.” 
Department of Health Green Paper, 2009

Supporting services

Workers and carers like the Star because it is simple to use, highly visual, holistic and focused on the reality of carers’ lives. Because it is collaborative, carers are engaged in their own process, rather than assessment being something ‘done to them’.

The completed Star gives a clear picture of carers’ needs and where they are on their journey, and helps to break change down into manageable steps so that support is more effective and better targeted.

For service managers, the collated Carers Star data provides information on carer outcomes to pinpoint good practice, gaps in provision or areas for improvement. Aggregated data can be used to compare services, and is also helpful in worker supervision.

Supporting carers

Carers complete the Carers Star in collaboration with a worker and plot their scores on a visual of the Carers Star, allowing them to see clearly where they are on their journey. The worker can then help the carer plan which areas to address and how.

At later meetings, worker and carer re-visit the Carers Star and get a clear picture of the progress that has been made and identify any further support needs.

Tried, tested and recommended

The Carers Star was developed by Triangle Consulting Social Enterprise in collaboration with Carers Trust and other carer organisations. Carers Trust secured funding from the Triangle Trust 1949 to develop a subsidised programme to roll out the adoption of the Carers Star across the The Carers Trust Network.

Outcomes Stars are widely used in the UK by voluntary organisations large and small, housing associations, NHS Foundation Trusts and local authorities, and have been backed by the Department of Health, the Big Lottery, NESTA, the National Social Inclusion Programme, the Chartered Institute of Housing, the London Housing Foundation, Homeless Link and the Mental Health Providers Forum, among others.

International interest in the Outcomes Star is also growing and it is used in several countries around the world. 

Further information

The Outcomes Star™ is a family of tools for supporting and measuring change when working with people. For more information, see www.outcomesstar.org.uk or email info@triangleconsulting.co.uk or call 020 7272 8765.

Carers Trust is a key collaborator on the Carers Star. For more information contact Carers Trust.

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Good Practice

Supporting carers of people with dementia in black, Asian and minority ethnic communities

A good practice example of working with carers of people with dementia from diverse communities by the Dementia Information and Support for Carers (DISC) service hosted by Sandwell Crossroads Birmingham
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecial education needsSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesDementia care
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:45
Body: 

DISC Dementia information and support for carers

The Disc Service was launched 11 years ago, it is hosted by Sandwell Crossroads and funded by Sandwell and West Birmingham, Cross City, South Central CCG’s, and Birmingham City Council through the Birmingham Bettercare Fund

The service originally operated in West Birmingham, but had funding extended to cover the entire Birmingham City Council area.

The service is focused on supporting carers from the diverse communities in the Birmingham area. The DISC service prides itself on being proactive in recruiting staff from local black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities who have both the language skills and understand the cultural sensitivities.

The service supports over 400 carers and offers Iiformation, advocacy and support for carers, though one-to-one contact and successful weekly information and support groups.

It also offers a signposting and referral service into other local statutory and voluntary sector services.

Examples of the type of help and support carers have receive:

  • Accessing respite
  • Liaising with district nurses, occupational therapists and social workers.
  • Continence advice and support.
  • Advice in managing changing and unusual behaviours.
  • Finding the right care such as day centres, care homes and care agencies.
  • Talking to the wider family.
  • Advice on benefits and carers' rights.
  • Information on the Mental Capacity Act.
  • Information on lasting power of attorney

DISC's strengths

  • Building relationships with carers over a long period of time.
  • Stepping in to offer support before a crisis develops.
  • Bridging the gap between clinical diagnosis and families coping alone.
  • Making carers feel welcome – 14 of them formally volunteer in supporting other carers.
  • Being led by carers, listening to carers and developing services to meet need.
  • Feeling passionate about the service.

Further information

For more information on the service contact Jo.Moon@sandwellcrossroads.org or visit the Sandwell Crossroads website.

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Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC)

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 13:30
Body: 

About the Empowering Professionals to support Young Carers (EPYC) project

Thanks to funding provided by the European Commission through the Erasmus+ programme, a group of organisations from Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Austria are working to find new ways to support young carers.

Each country involved in the EPYC project will develop a new tool, which we hope will help youth professionals - like teachers, social worker or youth workers - to better support young carers.

The tools aim to aid in the identification of young carers, to allow practitioners to assess the situation of young and young adult carers, including measuring the level and impact of the care burden, and to allow practitioners to develop an action plan to address issues adversely affecting young and young adult carers.

We will then trial the tool to see how it can help make Scotland a better place for young and young adult carers to grow up in.

Why is this project happening?

Young and young adult carers carry out, often on a regular basis, significant caring tasks and assume a level of responsibility which would not usually be associated with their age group.

Although research has provided clear evidence that heavy caring responsibilities can result in emotional difficulties, health problems, social exclusion and limited opportunities for social and leisure activities, professional support services are lacking in many EU countries.

Who is involved in the project?

The two year EU funded project started in August 2016  involving a strategic partnership of six European organisations, namely Carers Trust Scotland (UK), Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V. (Germany), Care Alliance Ireland (Ireland), Anziani e non solo (Italy), ARC ORK (Austria) and IPS Versari Macrelli (Italy).

The kick off meeting, hosted by the leading partner, Diakonisches Werk Berlin Stadtmitte e.V., was held in Berlin on 12 September 2016.

What can you do now?

Expected EPYC project outcomes

In the course of the project, intermediate expected results include:

  • An increased capacity of organisations to identify young and young adult carers.
  • An increased knowledge of promising or successful experiences and practices from other European countries.
  • An increased awareness of the challenges faced by young and young adult carers in the different local contexts involved directly or indirectly in project activities.

The outcome of the project is the improved expertise in this field and professional stakeholders having the knowledge to develop support services for young and young adult carers and work with relevant sectors to improve support.

If you are interested to know more about the EPYC project  contact:

  • Louise Morgan, Carers Trust Scotland, Young Carers Development Manager Working with the SYCSA. 
  • Paul Traynor, Carers Trust Scotland, Policy and Campaigns Officer (Young and Young Adult Carers). 
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Good Practice

Older Carers Toolkit

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsSpecialist servicesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 13:15
Body: 

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.

It shines a spotlight on particular issues most likely to impact on older carers. This can help inform commissioning to properly and most cost-effectively support them. It will also help commissioners fulfil duties to prevent, reduce and delay needs and to support older carers under the Care Act 2014.

Further information

Download the toolkit PDF iconCaring About Older Carers (PDF 307KB)

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Good Practice

Identification of carers in GP practices

Not enough carers are likely to be receiving the support they need or are entitled to. One of the main obstacles to carers getting the right support is identification – both self-identification and identification by health professionals.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary care
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 12:45
Body: 


There are an estimated seven million unpaid carers in the UK, however not enough carers are likely to be receiving the support they need or are entitled to. One of the main obstacles to carers getting the right support is identification – both self-identification and identification by health professionals.


Self-identification can be problematic as many carers, understandably, see their relationship with the person they care for as one of being a parent, child, neighbour, friend or partner and don’t recognise 'carer' as a term they would use.


This is why identification by health professionals becomes even more important.


Carers Trust’s Raising the voice of carers project works with local Network Partners and aims to give carers the tools and confidence to campaign on issues that matter to them.

Further information

Read our resource –  PDF iconIdentification of Carers in GP Practices (PDF 434 KB).

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Carers Trust ADVANCE mentoring scheme

ADVANCE was an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK. It ran from 2015 to 2018 and is backed by materials for you to download (all available below).
I work in: 
Carers services
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

ADVANCE Mentoring Programme – introduction/overview

Is good leadership about:
  • Knowing all the answers, pretty much all of the time?
  • Coming up with clear-cut solutions to complex problems?
  • Keeping your thoughts to yourself and not being swayed by other people?
Not so, according to a three-year impact study of ADVANCE, an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK – local charities delivering a range of services addressing the needs of unpaid carers and the people they care for. The traditional ‘heroic’ approach to leadership was considered by participants in the 12-month programme to be much less effective than the ability to:
  • Ask searching questions.
  • Listen carefully to different views.
  • Take time to reflect before acting.
Participating in ADVANCE enabled board members and chief executives to re-interpret their leadership role to fit a drastically changing world – a world where flexibility trumps rigidity every time. 
 
There is much to be learned from the experience of senior leaders who learned ‘on the run’ to enhance their confidence and skills in order to regain control of their lives and organisations. 
 
The independent impact study of the ADVANCE mentoring programme, commissioned by Carers Trust and carried out by Marsaili Cameron and Sheila Marsh from PublicServiceWorks, developed materials to support chief executives, board members and others to work separately and together in a focused way to ensure effective strategic leadership.
 
Findings from this study fed in regularly over three years to the ADVANCE mentors (senior volunteers from a wide range of backgrounds) and to the Carers Trust design team for the programme. This process enhanced the learning culture that characterised ADVANCE, supported by the work of Lead Mentor, Hilary Samson-Barry.
 

What materials are available, and how might you use them?

Want a summary of the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme?Deep Learning for Hard Times

  • PDF iconDeep Learning for Hard Times (PDF, 219KB) – a booklet summing up the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
  • Info cards – to support implementing the learning in similar local charities:
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards A-C  (PDF, 190KB) – focusing on building sustainability, strengthening governance and developing partnership/collaboration – the three top issues tackled through the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards 1-5  (PDF, 351KB) – focusing on transferable skills and practical insights gained by participants in the ADVANCE mentoring programme.

Want to make a presentation or work with a group?

Want to know more about the ADVANCE mentoring programme impact study and see the evidence behind the summary?

Want to discuss ADVANCE further?

If you would like to hear more about the context of  the ADVANCE mentoring programme and its introduction, email Carers Trust.
 
If you would like to know more about the methodology of the impact study, email Sheila Marsh or Marsaili Cameron of PublicServiceWorks.
Downloads: 
PDF icon Deep Learning for Hard Times (plus see more downloads below)
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Good Practice

Improving Health Outcomes for Older and Young Adult Carers

In 2011 Carers Trust was selected by People’s Health Trust to coordinate the delivery of health related projects managed by carers centres, Crossroad Care schemes and young carers services across England, Scotland and Wales.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illness
Outcomes: 
Wellbeing
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 14:00
Body: 

An Evaluation of the Improving Health Outcomes Programme 

As part of its Healthy Places, Healthy People funding programme, carers centres and schemes in locations pre-determined by People’s Health Trust were invited to submit project proposals detailing how they would spend funding to develop effective services to improve health outcomes for either older carers (those aged 60 plus) or young adult carers (aged 16–24) from socio-economically disadvantaged communities.

Graphic from report

Programme aim

The overarching aim of the programme was to improve the physical health and emotional wellbeing of carers across England, Scotland and Wales.

For older carer projects, Network Partners’ aims were divided into two categories, with Network Partners opting for either category:

  • Increase the opportunities for older carers to access activities aimed at improving health outcomes.
  • Increase the ability of older carers to access breaks from their caring role and improve the emotional, physical and/or financial health of older carers.

For all young adult carers projects, the specific aims were:

  • Improve the life chances of young adult carers.
  • Increase access to and/or develop support structures to enable young adult carers to move from appropriate children’s services to adult services.
  • Increase the support available for young adult carers to make informed choices about their own physical and mental health.

31 Network Partners were awarded funding in 30 geographical areas. 23 Network Partners planned to work on developing services for older carers, and eight Network Partners aimed to work with young adult carers. The grant available for each area was £40,000 for 12 months during 2012–13.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the programme concentrated on the project design and the impacts created for the beneficiaries supported by the projects. It also looked at the wider impact of the grant funding on the Network Partners, in particular exploring how grant funding can be used to address five wider issues that Network Partners are facing:

  • strategic
  • demand
  • asset
  • preventative and
  • carer-led challenges.

Download the PDF iconimproving health outcomes - impact report.

Improving the Health of Carers: A Casebook of Projects front coverImproving the Health of Carers:
A Casebook of Projects

This report takes an in-depth look at nine projects funded through the Improving Health Outcomes programme.

The report highlights the practical lessons from these projects about how to set up and deliver local support, and what to consider in the separate stages of work.

Download the PDF iconimproving health outcomes - casebook.

Older Carers Voices and Stories: The Personal Impact of Funding

This report aims to bring together older carers’ thoughts and feelings about dedicated services and activities delivered by Carers Trust Network Partners under the Improving Health Outcomes programme and the positive impact it has had on their lives.

Older Carers Voices and Stories: The Personal Impact of Funding front cover

Opinions have been gathered from 39 older carers who attended six focus groups held with Network Partners at Redbridge Carers Support Service, Derbyshire Carers Association, Helensburgh and Lomond Carers, Hillingdon Carers, North Argyll Carers Centre and Carer Support Wiltshire.

Older carer’s personal views about targeted services and activities, which would not have existed without the financial support of People’s Health Trust, are combined with five real life case studies. These provide a taste of the challenges older carers have to face on a daily basis and how just a little funding and support can have a significant and often life changing impact on carers’ health and wellbeing.

Download PDF iconimproving health outcomes - older carers voices and stories.

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PDF icon Improving Health Outcomes - Impact ReportPDF icon Improving Health Outcomes - Impact Report (Summary)
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