Good Practice

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Good Practice

Carers Trust ADVANCE mentoring scheme

ADVANCE was an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK. It ran from 2015 to 2018 and is backed by materials for you to download (all available below).
I work in: 
Carers services
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 09:00
Body: 

ADVANCE Mentoring Programme – introduction/overview

Is good leadership about:
  • Knowing all the answers, pretty much all of the time?
  • Coming up with clear-cut solutions to complex problems?
  • Keeping your thoughts to yourself and not being swayed by other people?
Not so, according to a three-year impact study of ADVANCE, an innovative volunteer mentoring programme developed by Carers Trust for chief executives of Network Partners in The Carers Trust Network across the UK – local charities delivering a range of services addressing the needs of unpaid carers and the people they care for. The traditional ‘heroic’ approach to leadership was considered by participants in the 12-month programme to be much less effective than the ability to:
  • Ask searching questions.
  • Listen carefully to different views.
  • Take time to reflect before acting.
Participating in ADVANCE enabled board members and chief executives to re-interpret their leadership role to fit a drastically changing world – a world where flexibility trumps rigidity every time. 
 
There is much to be learned from the experience of senior leaders who learned ‘on the run’ to enhance their confidence and skills in order to regain control of their lives and organisations. 
 
The independent impact study of the ADVANCE mentoring programme, commissioned by Carers Trust and carried out by Marsaili Cameron and Sheila Marsh from PublicServiceWorks, developed materials to support chief executives, board members and others to work separately and together in a focused way to ensure effective strategic leadership.
 
Findings from this study fed in regularly over three years to the ADVANCE mentors (senior volunteers from a wide range of backgrounds) and to the Carers Trust design team for the programme. This process enhanced the learning culture that characterised ADVANCE, supported by the work of Lead Mentor, Hilary Samson-Barry.
 

What materials are available, and how might you use them?

Want a summary of the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme?Deep Learning for Hard Times

  • PDF iconDeep Learning for Hard Times (PDF, 219KB) – a booklet summing up the impact of the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
  • Info cards – to support implementing the learning in similar local charities:
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards A-C  (PDF, 190KB) – focusing on building sustainability, strengthening governance and developing partnership/collaboration – the three top issues tackled through the ADVANCE mentoring programme.
    • PDF iconADVANCE Cards 1-5  (PDF, 351KB) – focusing on transferable skills and practical insights gained by participants in the ADVANCE mentoring programme.

Want to make a presentation or work with a group?

Want to know more about the ADVANCE mentoring programme impact study and see the evidence behind the summary?

Want to discuss ADVANCE further?

If you would like to hear more about the context of  the ADVANCE mentoring programme and its introduction, email Carers Trust.
 
If you would like to know more about the methodology of the impact study, email Sheila Marsh or Marsaili Cameron of PublicServiceWorks.
Downloads: 
PDF icon Deep Learning for Hard Times (plus see more downloads below)
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Good Practice

Yvonne test

Outcomes: 
Identifying carers
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 13:30
Body: 

Young carers in schools

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Good Practice

Identification of carers in GP practices

This report details good practice found in GP surgeries for identifying and supporting carers
Area of Care: 
Primary CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingCarers involvementCommissioning for carers
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, March 6, 2017 - 15:45
Body: 

This short report sets outs some of the good practice found in GP surgeries for identifying and supporting carers.

It can be used by Network Partners to show local GPs what can be done to better identify carers or by GPs to open up a conversation with their local carers service.

Download Identification of carers in GP practices report (PDF, 436KB)

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PDF icon Identification of carers in GP practices report (PDF, 436KB)
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Good Practice

Supporting carers of people with dementia in BAME communities

A good practice example of working with carers of people with dementia from diverse communities by the DISC (Dementia Information and Support for carers) service hosted by Sandwell Crossroads Birmingham.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 12:00
Body: 

DISC Dementia information and support for carers

The Disc Service was launched 11 years ago, it is hosted by Sandwell Crossroads and funded by Sandwell and West Birmingham, Cross City, South Central CCG’s, and Birmingham City Council through the Birmingham Bettercare Fund.

The service originally operated in West Birmingham, but have had funding extended this year, to cover the entire Birmingham City Council area.

The service is focused on supporting carers from the diverse communities in the Birmingham area. The DISC service prides itself on being proactive in reciting staff from local BMAE communities who have both the language skills and understand the cultural sensitivities.

The service support over 400 carers and offers Information, advocacy and support for carers, though one to one contact and a very successful weekly information and support groups which currently attracts upwards of 45 people.

They also offer a signposting and referral service into other local statutory and voluntary sector services.

Examples of the type of help and support carers have receive:

  • Accessing respite
  • Liaising with District Nurses, OT’s and social workers
  • Continence advice and support
  • Advice in managing changing and unusual behaviours
  • Finding the right care such as daycentres, care homes and care agencies
  • Talking to the wider family
  • Advice on benefits and carers rights
  • Information on the Mental Capacity Act
  • Information on Lasting Power Attorney

Disc's strengths

  • We build relationships with our carers over a long period of time.
  • We can often step in to offer support before a crisis develops.
  • We bridge the gap between clinical diagnosis and families coping alone.
  • Carers feel welcome – 14 of them formally volunteer in supporting other carers.
  • We are carer lead, we listen to our carers and develop services to meet need.
  • We all feel very passionate about our service.

For more information on the service contact Jo.Moon@sandwellcrossroads.org or visit the Sandwell Crossroads website.

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Good Practice

Protecting Young Carers from Bullying: A Guide for Schools, Community Groups and Policy Makers

The aim of the guide is to raise the awareness and understanding of the relationship between being a young carer and bullying, so proactive steps can be taken to help prevent young carers from being bullied.
Outcomes: 
Prevention
I work in: 
Social careEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Caring for: 
Children
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, August 12, 2016 - 09:30
Body: 

This guide is aimed at all professionals who work with young people and are therefore likely to come across young carers. This includes those working in a dedicated young carers service, a school, a community group, or in a health or social care setting. It is also of relevance to anyone with policy making responsibilities that affect transport and sport or leisure opportunities for young people.

The aim of the guide, along with the accompanying film and training presentation,
is to raise the awareness and understanding of the relationship between being a young carer and bullying, in order that proactive steps can be taken to help prevent young carers from being bullied.

‘Protecting Young Carers from Bullying’ - a short film

The training PowerPoint presentation aimed at leaders within schools, community groups and young carer services, this presentation complements the guide and the film.

The short evaluation details the local project that took place in Devon, including the consultation that underpinned the project and initial feedback from professionals who have received training based on the resources

 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Bullying prevention project evaluationPDF icon Protecting young carers from bullying guide
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The Young Carer Pharmacy Project

Working with pharmacies to improve identification and support for young carers and their families
I work with: 
Young carers
I work in: 
Pharmacy Services
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
14/09/16

Working with pharmacies to improve identification and support for young carers and their families

The Young Carer Pharmacy Project, one of Carers Trust’s Innovation Generation projects and in partnership with Salford Carers Centre, set out to improve the early identification of young carers and their families by pharmacies and their timely engagement with appropriate support.

Some work had already been undertaken with pharmacies and how they support young carers, in Scotland and Wales. This project in Salford wanted to build on and extend these ideas in England in order to:

  • Capitalise on the fact that pharmacies are ideally positioned to play a key role in identifying and initiating early and preventative support for young carers and their families
  • Develop more interest in working with pharmacies and promote the principles of joint working with community pharmacies to a wider audience

The learning from this project in Salford set out to feed into The Carer-friendly Pharmacy Pilot which was part of a programme of work funded by the Department of Health in its implementation of the National Carers Strategy through the ‘Supporting Carers in Primary Care Programme’. This programme ended in February 2015 and therefore the learning and materials from the project in Salford has remained separate.

The project in Salford ran between 2014 and 2016 and the following materials have been developed out of the project:

Engaging with Pharmacies: A Toolkit for Young Carer Services
This toolkit sets out how pharmacies can better identify and support young carers (and families). It is intended that pharmacies are supported to do this by a local carers’ service.

Supporting materials

A Carer awareness training PowerPoint for pharmacy teams

Young Carers Authorisation Form (Medicines Collection)

The Young Carers Authorisation Form (Medicines Collection) is intended to facilitate by prior arrangement, young people with caring responsibilities collecting medication on behalf of the person they help to look after.

Young Carers Authorisation Form (Medicines Collection) Supporting information

Do you look after someone in your family who is ill or disabled? A poster has been produced  setting out how pharmacies can support young carers and families.

A4 Poster  A5 Poster

The Carer Champion Role (An example from Salford)

Pharmacies may wish to put up posters to promote the online support for young carers from Carers Trust

Matter and Babble Posters and Postcards

Secondary / Background materials

The Young Carer Pharmacy Project Learning Report: Working with pharmacies to improve identification and support for young carers and their families

 

 

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Good Practice

Advocacy

Advocacy is a distinct professional role with standards and expectations that differ from those of information and advice services.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingEmploymentSocial careEducation
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

Advocacy for carers relates to services that help carers say what they want, secure their rights and represent their interests. This can be delivered in different ways, depending on the needs and wishes of local carers, and may include services that:

  • empower carers to have their voices heard in decisions that affect them
  • ensure carers are aware of their rights and can choose the level / type of caring they take on
  • help with complaints procedures.

Although advocacy services offer information and advice, advocacy is a distinct professional role with standards and expectations that differ from those of information and advice services.

Advocates need to have the necessary training, expertise and supervision as well as up-to-date knowledge. Advocacy services also need a strong practice framework of objective and independent standards, and must be able to offer independent advice, even if the service is funded by a statutory agency.

In some cases, the person being cared for may have an advocate as well, particularly when mental health or drugs and alcohol are involved. As the needs and wishes of the carer are not always the same as those of the person being cared for, it becomes a juggling act between the two advocates to work out what is best for both parties.

Further information

Read Action for Advocacy's Quality Standards for Advocacy Schemes or get further information from the Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance.

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Improving Health Outcomes for Older and Young Adult Carers

In 2011 Carers Trust was selected by People’s Health Trust to coordinate the delivery of health related projects managed by carers centres, Crossroad Care schemes and young carers services across England, Scotland and Wales.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illness
Outcomes: 
Wellbeing
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 14:00
Body: 

An Evaluation of the Improving Health Outcomes Programme 

As part of its Healthy Places, Healthy People funding programme, carers centres and schemes in locations pre-determined by People’s Health Trust were invited to submit project proposals detailing how they would spend funding to develop effective services to improve health outcomes for either older carers (those aged 60 plus) or young adult carers (aged 16–24) from socio-economically disadvantaged communities.

Graphic from report

Programme aim

The overarching aim of the programme was to improve the physical health and emotional wellbeing of carers across England, Scotland and Wales.

For older carer projects, Network Partners’ aims were divided into two categories, with Network Partners opting for either category:

  • Increase the opportunities for older carers to access activities aimed at improving health outcomes.
  • Increase the ability of older carers to access breaks from their caring role and improve the emotional, physical and/or financial health of older carers.

For all young adult carers projects, the specific aims were:

  • Improve the life chances of young adult carers.
  • Increase access to and/or develop support structures to enable young adult carers to move from appropriate children’s services to adult services.
  • Increase the support available for young adult carers to make informed choices about their own physical and mental health.

31 Network Partners were awarded funding in 30 geographical areas. 23 Network Partners planned to work on developing services for older carers, and eight Network Partners aimed to work with young adult carers. The grant available for each area was £40,000 for 12 months during 2012–13.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the programme concentrated on the project design and the impacts created for the beneficiaries supported by the projects. It also looked at the wider impact of the grant funding on the Network Partners, in particular exploring how grant funding can be used to address five wider issues that Network Partners are facing:

  • strategic
  • demand
  • asset
  • preventative and
  • carer-led challenges.

Download the PDF iconimproving health outcomes - impact report.

Improving the Health of Carers: A Casebook of Projects front coverImproving the Health of Carers:
A Casebook of Projects

This report takes an in-depth look at nine projects funded through the Improving Health Outcomes programme.

The report highlights the practical lessons from these projects about how to set up and deliver local support, and what to consider in the separate stages of work.

Download the PDF iconimproving health outcomes - casebook.

Older Carers Voices and Stories: The Personal Impact of Funding

This report aims to bring together older carers’ thoughts and feelings about dedicated services and activities delivered by Carers Trust Network Partners under the Improving Health Outcomes programme and the positive impact it has had on their lives.

Older Carers Voices and Stories: The Personal Impact of Funding front cover

Opinions have been gathered from 39 older carers who attended six focus groups held with Network Partners at Redbridge Carers Support Service, Derbyshire Carers Association, Helensburgh and Lomond Carers, Hillingdon Carers, North Argyll Carers Centre and Carer Support Wiltshire.

Older carer’s personal views about targeted services and activities, which would not have existed without the financial support of People’s Health Trust, are combined with five real life case studies. These provide a taste of the challenges older carers have to face on a daily basis and how just a little funding and support can have a significant and often life changing impact on carers’ health and wellbeing.

Download PDF iconimproving health outcomes - older carers voices and stories.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Improving Health Outcomes - Impact ReportPDF icon Improving Health Outcomes - Impact Report (Summary)
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Universities supporting students with caring responsibilities

View details of Universities in the UK who have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities. This page will grow as more details are added in the coming months, so please visit again.
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, January 26, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

This is a list of Universities in the UK who have implemented dedicated support for students with caring responsibilities. If you would like to contribute what your university does for students with caring responsibilities to this list, please send a summary to ycteam@carers.org

Please note, this does not claim to be a comprehensive list of universities who have implemented specific support for carers. Furthermore, Carers Trust has not checked or vetted the support promoted here by universities.

Initiatives supporting young adult carers at universities

The University of Birmingham 

Young Adult Carers Event:  2 April 2015 

This event, hosted by the University of Birmingham, is designed for young adult carers to discover and learn about university and student life.  Those who participate in the event will:

  • learn about the subjects that they can study at university, as well as meet students who are currently studying for their first degree
  • get the opportunity to visit The University of Nottingham in the summer to explore its campus and learn more about Higher Education.

University lead contact for student carers: Jane Patel - call 0121 414 8489. 

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The University of Nottingham

Outreach and taster days for young adult carers

The University of Nottingham hosts outreach and taster day activities for young adult carer groups from around the Midlands. In 2015 these are taking place during the Easter and Summer holidays and are being run in partnership with the University of Birmingham. Contact Emma Szembek or Daisy Throup for further information.

Student Support for those with caring responsibilities 

The Student Support Team at the University of Nottingham has a dedicated contact for students with caring responsibilities, Carole East. Students are welcome to contact Carole directly, her contact details are: carole.east@nottingham.ac.uk or 0115 9514471.

University lead contact for student carers: Emma Szembek - call 0115 8466468 or Daisy Throup - call 0115 8467336.  

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The University of Winchester

Specific outreach to young carers and young adult carers

The University of Winchester runs an annual residential for young adult carers aged 14+ living in the county of Hampshire.

The University hosts taster days for young adult carers aged 14+ and in 2015 will host taster days for young carers aged between 11 and 14.

The University engages in partnership work with young carers projects around Hampshire as part of its widening participation work and to support young carers with life skills and career choices.

The University recruits young adult carer students as Higher Education Ambassadors for the University. In 2013-14 the University had seven students who had been young carers working at outreach events.

Visit the University young carers page.

Multi-agency partnership working for young carers and young adult carers

The University of Winchester contributes annually to the Young Carers Festival organised by The Children’s Society. 

The University will host an event in 2015 for young adult carers from across Hampshire. This will give young adult carers an experience of a University campus and provide them with information about higher education. It will also consult young adult carers on local health and social care services.

Visit the University young adults carers page.  

Compact Scheme

The University of Winchester specifically includes in its Compact Scheme, with local colleges and sixth forms, students ‘who have caring responsibilities’ or who have ‘a disrupted pattern of education’ or who have ‘problems relating to health, disability or bereavement’, among other criteria.

Postgraduate financial support for young adult carers

The University of Winchester of Winchester has a Postgraduate Access Scholarship Scheme (PASS). The scholarship provides a 20% discount on tuition fees for a number of groups including a “carer for a family member with long-term ill-health or disability”.

University lead contact for student carers: Dr Terri Sandison - call 01962 827225 or Joanne Gale-Chambers - call 01962 624890.

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York St John University

Partnership work with York Carers Centre

York St John University works closely with York Carers Centre to support young adult carers. This includes a York Carers Centre stall at Fresher’s Fair and information stalls throughout the year.

University lead contact for student carers: Anna Herbert - call 01904 876408 or Vanesa Emslie - call 01904 876970.#

De Montford University

DMU recognises that students with caring responsibilities may have additional support needs.  We have set up a webpage of useful information and contacts for student carers and encourage any student with a caring role to contact one of the designated staff for student carers.  

 
University lead contacts for student carers:
Melissa Page, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7872
Ryan Ward, HE Guidance Officer call 0116 257 7605
Email: transitions@dmu.ac.uk
 
DMU are able to organise university experience days for student carers which involves taster sessions, campus and accommodation tours and meeting current students.
 
The university is part of local networks including those run by Leicester City Council and Barnardos.  They also have five UNITE Foundation Scholarships which offer free accommodation in a Unite hall of residence for three years and £3,000 p.a. living costs. Student carers are a priority group for this award.  
 
For further information please contact Melissa Page.

Sheffield Hallam University

Information about support for student carers at the university is available on their website.

Pre entry support

The Compact scheme provides extra support to students who face barriers to progressing to university due to having caring responsibilities (amongst other circumstances). Contact the Compact team on 0114 225 4231 or email

On course support for student carers
University lead contacts for student carers – Robin Kerr and Lynette Granger, call 0114 225 3813 or email

Ring round of new student carers to check how students are settling in, resolve any issues and refer to appropriate support services. Targeted emails are also sent to raise awareness of relevant opportunities and support services.

Information and advice pages for student carers – dedicated pages for student carers are included on the Student Advice and Information blog. Robin and Lynette also post articles on the blog about their work with student carers.

One to one advice for student carers – Robin and Lynette are happy to see any student on a one to one basis to discuss their caring role, give information and advice about university life and provide supported referrals to local carers’ organisations

Partnership work with local carers’ organisations – Robin and Lynette have made close links with local carers’ organisations to help support student carers.

Staff from Sheffield Carers’ Centre and Sheffield Young Carers’ Project have also delivered training to staff in student facing roles across the university.

Financial support for students with caring responsibilities
Students with caring responsibilities who may need extra financial support because they have higher than expected costs or they have a sudden financial emergency are eligible to make an application to the Sheffield Hallam Student Support Fund. Further information is available from Student Funding and Access Support on 0114 225 3813 or via email

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University of Manchester

For more information visit the University of Manchester student carers webpage or contact Jessica Nightingale on 0161 275 2987

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Time to be Heard Event - Nottingham University 2014 - Evaluation Report

Read the evaluation of the Time to be Heard campaign event that took place in Nottingham in 2014.
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, December 16, 2014 - 14:15
Body: 

List of the most common words that came out of discussion at the event.As part of the Time to be Heard campaign, Carers Trust organised an event for 200 young adult carers (aged 16-25) and their support workers to get their voices heard by the decision makers who could reduce these barriers.

Some key themes emerged:

  • Young adult carers need tailored information.
  • Young adult carers are concerned about disclosing their caring status.
  • Young adult carers are worried about going to university.
  • Young adult carers face distinct barriers to accessing further education.

The event also provided information and dispelled myths about access to college and university.

Read the PDF iconevaluation of the event

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