Guidance

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Guidance

Partners in Care

The Royal College of Psychiatrists and The Princess Royal Trust for Carers (now Carers Trust) joined forces and launched the Partners in Care campaign. The partnership produced a range of leaflets on specific conditions and a comprehensive toolkit.
Area of Care: 
Mental Health
Outcomes: 
IntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers involvementCommissioning
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 14:30
Body: 

The Royal College of Psychiatrists and The Princess Royal Trust for Carers (now Carers Trust)  joined forces and launched the Partners in Care campaign in January 2004.

The objectives of the campaign were to highlight the problems faced by carers of all ages of people with different mental health problems and learning disabilities, and encourage true partnerships between carers, patients and professionals.

The partnership produced the following leaflets:

  • checklist for professionals working with mental health carers
  • checklist for professionals working with children of parents with mental health problems
  • checklist for carers meeting with psychiatrists
  • confidentiality leaflet.

The partnership also produced a range of leaflets on specific conditions and a comprehensive toolkit.

To find out more and access the leaflets, visit the Partners in Care website.

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Guidance

Working with carers of people with mental health issues

Carers of people with mental health issues deserve support, both in relation to the people they care for, and for themselves as carers. Indeed, carers are often working long hours, in unpredictable circumstances and with little or no help, to care for those closest to them.
Area of Care: 
Mental Health
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 13:45
Body: 

Carers of people with mental health problems come into contact with a range of health and social care professionals. Both in the community and in healthcare institutions, carers routinely link with psychiatrists, social workers, nurses, GPs, voluntary and charity staff, as well as many other workers.

Invaluable aid to health professionals

Carers of people with mental health issues deserve support, both in relation to the people they care for, and for themselves as carers. Indeed, carers are often working long hours, in unpredictable circumstances and with little or no help, to care for those closest to them. But in this way, carers are often an invaluable aid to health professionals' work, giving an experienced insight into the care and needs of the service user.

However, there are always challenges working with, and involving carers of people with mental health issues. Dealing with issues such as confidentiality, disputes over care and treatment, and balancing the different needs of carers and service users are common experiences for many healthcare professionals. In this sense, professionals also need support, and the necessary resources to work in partnership with carers. 

Overview of issues

An overview of the issues faced by carers has been produced by Carers Trust, as well as an outline of the key changes which we would like to see happen nationally. 

Making Respite Real in Mental Health

Carers of people with mental health problems benefit from a break from their caring role just like other carers, however, research undertaken by Carers Trust showed that many carers, service users and professionals were unaware of how to respite and carer breaks. Carers Trust has developed guidance for professionals, carers and service users to promote the value of respite, the need for it to be planned for and how to access it.

Download the leaflet  Making Respite Real in Mental Health.

The guidance is suitable for carers, professionals and service users.

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Guidance

Flu Vaccinations for Carers campaign - useful resources

NHS Employers and Carers Trust produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014 which healthcare staff can download .
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 4, 2018 - 09:15
Body: 

Help reach carers across the whole community

NHS Employers and Carers Trust  produced flu campaign guidance and resources in 2014. Carers Trust also produced a set of resources aimed to be used by a wide range of organisations to as well as individuals to encourage flu vaccination uptake among carers. The resources also encourage carers to get in touch with Carers Trust for details of their local carer service. 

The Word versions of each resource were designed to be customised to include your organisation’s own logo.

Further details

For more information about the Flu Vaccination Campaign for Carers, please email Carers Trust.

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Guidance

Supporting Young Carers Aged Five to Eight

This resource aims to bring clarity for services working with young carers, as to whether or not it is necessary for them to register with Ofsted if they choose to work with children under eight years old..
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Carers services
I work with: 
Young carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 14:45
Body: 

Part two presents some local practice being undertaken by Carers Trust Network Partner, Carers Lewisham, with young carers aged 5–8. Although Part 1 of this resource is specific to England, many of the ideas and practice in Part 2 are applicable across the UK.

Further information

Download  the Carers Trust resource – PDF iconSupporting Young Carers Aged 5 to 8 a Resource for Professionals Working with Younger Carers

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Guidance

Ten signs that tell community pharmacy teams that someone may be a carer

Top tips from Carer-friendly Pharmacies on identifying which of your patients and customers are likely to be looking after someone who couldn't get by without their support.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
I work in: 
Health careCarers services
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2015 - 11:30
Body: 

Carers are often the people who:-

  • Drop off and collect prescriptions for another person.

  • Collect medications for someone who has a condition (e.g. dementia) which suggests that they wouldn't be able to get by on their own.

  • Buy incontinence products or other items associated with ill health, frailty or disability.

  • Ask for advice about someone else’s medication, health condition or disability rather than their own.

  • Sit in on a Medicines Use Review and give the impression that they are main 'manager' of your patient's medications.

  • May seem to be in a hurry to get back home because they don't want to leave someone on their own for very long.

  • Visit the pharmacy with someone who appears to need their support. 

  • May look tired, depressed or anxious when the person they usually accompany isn't with them. 

  • Take delivery of medications from the pharmacy delivery driver.

  • Regularly buy over-the-counter medicines for another person.

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Guidance

Flu vaccinations for carers: Guidance for community pharmacy teams

Now that carers can have a free NHS flu jab at their local pharmacy, Carers Trust has produced a range of resources to help pharmacy teams identify carers and offer them support.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers services
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 09:15
Body: 

Why should carers have a flu jab?

When you’re looking after someone who’s old or disabled and unable to get by without your help, catching the flu can be catastrophic. That’s why unpaid carers are eligible for a free NHS flu jab, providing they receive Carer's Allowance or are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare would be at risk if the carer was ill. Once a carer's been vaccinated against the flu, they're also less likely to pass the virus on to the person they care for, who could become seriously ill as a result.

Most carers have been missing out so far

Even though carers have been eligible for a free NHS flu jab for several years, last season only 174,522 of England’s 5,430,000 unpaid carers were vaccinated against the flu by their GP practice. In fact, only 386,898 people were recorded by their GP practice as being a carer. But now that carers can have a flu jab at their local pharmacy, the hope is that many more will be identified, vaccinated and supported in future. Here’s how you can help.

Follow the 60-second Flu Chat 

To help busy pharmacy teams identify carers quickly and easily, Carers Trust has produced a PDF icon'60-second Carers Flu Chat' which suggests how you can engage someone you think might be a carer in a quick conversation about why they should consider getting vaccinated. The script also suggests that you offer to let the carer’s GP practice know that they're a carer when you notify the practice that they've been vaccinated.

Wider support

You’ll notice that the Flu Chat also suggests that you give carers some information to read about their local carers service which they may find useful. You could also give the carer a leaflet with details of the services your pharmacy can provide such as repeat prescriptions, home deliveries and MURs. Another option is to give carers a copy of Carers Trust's booklet, PDF iconA Carer's Guide to Managing Medicines

Supporting carers in a nutshell

Along with the 60-second Flu Chat, we’ve also produced a PDF iconone-page infographic with key information on protecting carers from the flu. As with the Flu Chat, we recommend you give a copy of the infographic to every member of your team and put it on the wall in your staff room to encourage the whole team to ‘think carer’. And if you'd like to broaden and strengthen your knowledge of carers further still, check out the Carers Floor in the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education's LearningPharmacy. PSNC has also produced some guidance on supporting carers which you may find useful. 

Promoting the service to carers

PSNC has produced a pharmacy PDF iconflu vaccination poster specifically aimed at carers.

Any questions?

If you have any questions about supporting carers or any feedback you’re happy to share, please email primarycare@carers.org. You’ll also find a wide range of information for carers on Carers Trust’s main website.  

TEN SIGNS THAT TELL COMMUNITY PHARMACY TEAMS THAT SOMEONE MAY BE A CARER

Carers are often the people who:-

  1. Drop off and collect prescriptions for another person.
  2. Collect medications for someone who has a condition (e.g. dementia) which suggests that they wouldn't be able to get by on their own.
  3. Buy incontinence products or other items associated with ill health, frailty or disability.
  4. Ask for advice about someone else’s medication, health condition or disability rather than their own.
  5. Sit in on a Medicines Use Review and give the impression that they are main 'manager' of your patient's medications.
  6. May seem to be in a hurry to get back home because they don't want to leave someone on their own for very long.
  7. Visit the pharmacy with someone who appears to need their support. 
  8. May look tired, depressed or anxious when the person they usually accompany isn't with them. 
  9. Take delivery of medications from the pharmacy delivery driver.
  10. Regularly buy over-the-counter medicines for another person.
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Guidance

Young Carer Assessment Tools

Local authorities must offer an assessment where it appears that a child is involved in providing care. Here are some examples of assessment tools that could form part of an overall whole family approach to assessment.
Area of Care: 
Primary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Information and adviceCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carersFamilies
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 - 09:00
Body: 
The Children and Families Act 2014 amended the Children Act to make it easier for young carers to get an assessment of their needs and to introduce ‘whole family’ approaches to assessment and support. Local authorities must offer an assessment where it appears that a child is involved in providing care. Here are some examples of assessment tools that could make up a part of an overall whole family approach to assessment. This guidance has been compiled by Carers Trust and The Children's Society as part of the Making a step change: Putting it into practice programme.

MACA YC-18: Multidimensional Assessment of Caring Activities

The MACA is a questionnaire to be completed by young carers that can be used as an indicator of the total amount of caring activity undertaken by a child or young person, as well as six subscale scores for: 
  1. Domestic tasks
  2. Household management
  3. Personal care
  4. Emotional care
  5. Sibling care
  6. Financial/practical care.

PANOC YC-20: Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring 

The Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring (PANOC-YC20) is a questionnaire to be completed by young carers that can be used to provide an index (or score) of the subjective cognitive and emotional impact of caring in young people.

Common Assessment Framework (CAF)

The CAF is a nationally standardised approach to conducting an assessment of the needs of a child or young person and deciding how those needs should be met. The CAF will promote more effective, earlier identification of children’s additional needs and improve multi-agency working. It is intended to provide a simple, non-bureaucratic process for a holistic assessment of a child’s needs, taking account of the individual, family and community.
More information on the CAF can be found in the PDF iconCAF Simplified Assessment Workstream

Outcomes Star 

Outcomes StarThe Outcomes Star™ both measures and supports progress towards self-reliance or other goals on multiple key areas such as health, caring role, relationships, feelings and behaviours, education and learning, etc. Different versions of the Star include the Carers Star, My Star and the Family Star. Each star is used to capture the voice of the young carer and their family, their needs, and their perspective on the changes they are experiencing.

My Life Now Wheel

My Life Now WheelMy Life Now is an individual Assessment and Planning Tool for Young Carers. The tools include both an in depth and quick assessment wheel and a framework for setting goals.

 

 

The YCRG screening tool (YC-QST-20)

The questions in the Screening Tool have been cognitively tested in the DfE national study of young carers (with young carers themselves) and in YCRG research over many years. The tool and explanatory model are also currently being used in other countries (Japan, US) to help both researchers and practitioners identify young carers and their needs.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Manual for Measures of Caring Activities and Outcomes For Children and Young People 2nd EditionPDF icon CAF - Simplified Assessment Workstream
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Guidance

Triangle of Care for Dementia

The Triangle of Care for Dementia was developed in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing and in consultation with carers, people with dementia and professionals. It is based on the original Triangle of Care and is aimed at acute care hospitals.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 09:30
Body: 

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care

In 2013 Carers Trust worked with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) to adapt the Triangle of Care to meet the needs of carers of people with dementia when the person they cared for was adapted to a general hospital. A stakeholder day was held where carers, people with dementia and professionals were consulted and provided feedback on the Triangle of Care. 

Carers Trust and the RCN worked together in 2016 to update the guide.

The new guide and self assessment tool were launched in November 2016, this is specifically aimed at acute hospital wards and services where a person with dementia may be admitted but their dementia is not the reason for their admission.

The guide is to enable professionals to look at how they can identify and support carers ensuring that the person with dementia is included and receives the best care outcomes as well as positive outcomes for the carer.

PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice in Dementia Care.pdf

FileTriangle of Care for Dementia Self-Assessment Tool (Word Version)

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland

To reflect the Scottish context, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to suit the Scottish legislation, initiatives and policies around dementia. The Scottish version has been a collaborative effort between Carers Trust Scotland, Royal College of Nursing Scotland, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, University of
Stirling Dementia Services Research and Dementia Carers Voices.

 PDF iconThe Triangle of Care Carers Included a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care in Scotland.pdf.

The Triangle of Care Carers Included: a Guide to Best Practice for Dementia Care, Wales Edition

In Wales, the Triangle of Care has been adapted to reflect Welsh legislation, good practice examples and policies around dementia in secondary care. The Wales edition has been funded by the Royal Collage of Nursing and adapted for use in Wales by Carers Trust Wales.

 

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Guidance

Examples of Practice: Supporting young carers in families who may experience stigma

There are many hidden young carers in communities due to a lack of understanding and identification.
Area of Care: 
Alcohol MisuseSubstance Misuse
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carersFamilies
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 09:30
Body: 

Young carers often remain hidden in their communities, not getting the support they need. There are many reasons young carers go unidentified including a lack of public understanding about who young carers are and young carers themselves not realising that their lives are different from other children’s.

However, one of the main reasons young carers slip through the net is because their parents do not have an obvious condition - so people do not realise young people are caring or think they need any help. This situation can be made worse if the condition itself is stigmatised and a young carer or their family is reluctant or fearful of seeking help.

Support

Young carers and their families who may be more likely to experience stigma can benefit from different types of support.  

PDF iconOut of hours family support for young carers living with a substance misusing adult

The project aims to provide a range of emotional and practical support to families in order to improve outcomes for young carers, the substance misusing adults they care for and the wider family.

PDF iconSupporting families affected by drug and alcohol misuse

This initiative brings together knowledge, skills and experience from the adults and children’s sector to deliver a whole family approach that looks at how substance misuse effects the whole family.

PDF iconSupporting young carers from families affected by HIV

An initiative that works closely with families affected by HIV, faith and community leaders, schools, local social services and GPs to provide all round support for young carers.

Examples of practice

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Guidance

Protecting the Health and Wellbeing of Young Carers – examples of practice

Being a young carer can often have a severe, significant and long-lasting impact on a young person’s health and wellbeing.
Area of Care: 
Mental Health
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awareness
I work in: 
Health careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesSocial careEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:15
Body: 

Assessing the health needs of young carers

The initiative aims to undertake comprehensive health assessments of children and young people targeted by the young carers’ service in Oxford City. It supports collaborative working between health, social care and education and ensures a more coordinated pathway of care.

Young carer-led and age-appropriate respite for young carers

PDF iconThe young carers service provides respite breaks and activities for young carers, but with young carers right at the heart of decision making, from choosing what activities they do to educating professionals about young carers’ needs.

Other examples of practice

Downloads: 
PDF icon young carer led and age appropriate respite for young carers
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