Key Info

Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Key Info

Supporting Young Carers in School: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff

Designed with teachers and schools staff, this resource helps make the identification and support of young carers in schools as easy as possible.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Education
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, February 24, 2017 - 13:15
Body: 
My caring role...sets me back and means I can't reach my potential.
Young carer

Welcome to Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff. This resource has been written in association with teachers and school staff to help make the identification and support of young carers in schools as easy as possible.  

It forms part of the Young Carers in Schools programme, a free England wide initiative making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers and awarding good practice. 

Together with the programme's free webinars, videos, case studies and the termly e-Newsletter , the Step-by-step Guide will help schools achieve the Young Carers in Schools Award. To start working towards an Award, please see our 5 key actions to getting involved.

Who is the Step-by-step Guide for?

The Step-by-step Guide is for use in secondary and primary schools in England but could be easily adapted for use in the rest of the UK.

What does the Step-by-step Guide offer your school? 

Identifying early means an improvement in achievement, attainment and wellbeing, if the right support is offered.
Young Carers School Operational Lead

Many schools are delivering exceptional practice, making a real and positive difference to the young carers they support. Other schools have told us they want to achieve these excellent outcomes, but don't know where to begin. This Step-by-step Guide sets out ten key steps to implementing effective identification and support for young carers in schools:

Like other aspects of school life, the development of effective support for young carers is reliant on regular reviews of current provision and the identification of areas for continual improvement.  The steps are therefore a cyclical process, which schools should engage with throughout the school year.  

Schools are perfectly placed to offer the support these children and young people need. The… Step-by-step Guide will act as an invaluable resource for schools in providing the right assistance to pupils as and when they need it.
Edward Timpson, Children and Families Minister 

Making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers

The Step-by-step Guide has been developed with teachers and school staff who understand the pressures that schools face to deliver the very wide range of demands placed upon them.  As a result it is designed to be as flexible and helpful as possible.

Each step is accompanied by key information and practical tools, which schools can use and adapt to suit their school structure and local circumstances.  

Not all schools will need to use all the tools included.  Some may find it more helpful to choose those that will help enhance the support they already offer to young carers and their families while other will want to simply start and build their activities over a number of years.  

Find out more

To find out more, and for a full list of the tools accompanying each step, download the PDF iconintroduction to the Step-by-step Guide. Other tools and resources that you may find useful are included in our helpful PDF iconadditional resourcesguide.

Let us know if you use the Step-by-step Guide

Your feedback about the Step-by-step Guide is invaluable to us.  It will steer any future resources we create and help ensure that our guidance and tools reflect the busy realities of school life and make the identification and support of young carers in schools as easy as possible.

If you have read or used any part of the Step-by-step Guide, and are happy to give us your feedback, please let us know by filling in this form.

Related content

Downloads: 
PDF icon Introduction PDF icon Taking manageable steps to identify hidden young carers - good practice example
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Key Info

Whole family approaches

Young carers exist because someone in their family network requires their support. Caring for a family member or friend can be a positive experience for a young person which can strengthen family relationships and build a young person’s life skills and maturity.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Families
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:15
Body: 

Why is whole family working important?

Young carers exist because someone in their family network requires their support. Caring for a family member or friend can be a positive experience for a young person which can strengthen family relationships and build a young person’s life skills and maturity. However, children must not be relied on to take on inappropriate or excessive caring roles that impact on their health, wellbeing, development or life opportunities.

Many young carers are providing caring roles that negatively impact on their own lives. Whole family working is essential to identify young carers early, address the root causes of why any child is undertaking a caring role and ensure the family have the right support in place.

What is whole family working for young carers?

Whole family working involves understanding and addressing the needs of the family as a whole.

This means:

  • considering the impact of an individual’s additional needs on the rest of their family
  • Addressing a child’s needs within the context of their family, instead of in isolation.

Evidence in practice highlights the particular benefits of supporting a young carer in the context of their family. By addressing the reasons why a young person is caring and providing support to the person who needs care and support and the wider family, the role and well-being of the young carer can be significantly changed.

In England, The Care Act 2014 enshrines in law the importance of a whole family approach as an effective way to understand and address the needs of an individual in the context of their family. See what the Care Act Says about whole family approaches and young carers in England.

What constitutes a ‘whole family approach’?

There are a number of different components that make a ‘whole family approach’ including:

  • whole family assessments   
  • support for adults and other family members within the family, such as parenting support; provision of practical and emotional support
  • building support networks including engaging the wider family through for example, family group conferences
  • relationship building within the family, such as support with building roles, routines and responsibilities and engaging families in positive activities (such as planning a menu, cooking together or a family picnic).
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Key Info

Young Carers and School

Young carers are a vulnerable and disadvantaged group, who often experience difficulties in their education.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesSocial careEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Sunday, October 8, 2017 - 09:00
Body: 

Why do young carers need support from school?  

Young carers are a vulnerable and disadvantaged group, who often experience difficulties in their education. Without support, they can struggle to attend school and make good progress and a quarter of young carers have said they are bullied because of their caring role

Identifying and supporting young carers is an effective way of improving the attainment and attendance of this pupil group; who are specifically mentioned in Ofsted and Estyn evaluation inspection schedules and frequently eligible for free school meals and pupil premium/development grant funding.

Will there be young carers in all schools?

It is likely that there will be young carers at every school in England and Wales:

  • A survey by the BBC in 2010 estimated that about 1 in 12 secondary aged pupils have caring responsibilities.
  • The number of 5-7 year olds providing care increased by 83% between 2001 and 2011.
  • 39% of young carers have said that nobody in their school was aware of their caring role (Carers Trust, 2010).
"Schools have a key role in identifying and supporting all young carers.…. Ofsted take particular interest in the experiences of more vulnerable children, including young carers, during inspections."
Edward Timpson, the Minister for Children and Families, October 2012

What support is available to schools?

In England

Young Carers in Schools is an exciting England-wide programme that equips schools to support young carers and awards effective practice. Led by Carers Trust and The Children’s Society's Young Carers in Focus partnership, this programme has been developed with teachers and school staff to make it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers and rewards good practice. It is funded by The Queen’s Trust and the Big Lottery Fund.

The programme is open to all schools in England and to sign up, schools just need to register online

By taking part, schools can show that they are meeting the needs of a particularly vulnerable group of pupils (specifically mentioned in Ofsted’s School Inspection Handbook) and access:

Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff

Written in association with teachers and school staff, who understand the pressures that schools face to deliver the very wide range of demands placed upon them, this Step-by-step Guide helps you step-by-step and includes templates, tools and guidance.

Expert regional networks 

Bringing together schools, young carer services, and health and social care professionals for peer-to-peer learning and training. Opportunities will be available online and face-to-face to make sure everyone can get the best from these networks. 

Young Carers in Schools Award

Schools can provide evidence to showcase how they adhere to five Young Carers’ Standards created by young carers and apply online for a Bronze, Silver or Gold Award. This will enable schools to gain recognition from several leading charities for their effective practice. 

Young Carers in Schools: Information for schools and those working with them

Sign up today to receive this termly enewsletter which will highlight relevant policy developments, spotlight good practice and give updates on the programme’s successes.  Additional Resources

In Wales

Young Carers in Schools Wales programme  is now available for schools in Wales and is currently being rolled out via school clusters. Use the link to find out more including what’s available, access to bilingual resources and details on how to apply.

Supporting Young Carers: A resource for schools (Archive)

PDF iconSupporting young carers: a resource for schools
An extended resource for schools. This resource was developed in 2010 in partnership with The Children’s Society: Phelps, D, Leadbitter H, Manzi, D (2010), Supporting Young Carers: A Resource for Schools (The Princess Royal Trust for Carers and The Children’s Society) (Archive)

Supporting Young Carers in Schools: An Introduction for Primary and Secondary School Staff

PDF iconsupporting young carers in schools
An introductory resource helping schools to set up systems to identify and support pupils who are young carers.

Pupil Premium: Support for Young Carers - primary school resource and secondary school resource

PDF iconpupil premium - primary school resource
Guidance showing how targeted use of the Pupil Premium can support pupils with caring responsibilities.

 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Pupil Premium: Support for Young Carers - primary school resourcePDF icon Pupil Premium: Support for Young Carers – secondary school resource
Share it: