Research

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Research

Retirement on Hold: supporting older carers report

The Retirement on Hold report by Carers Trust highlights the issues older carers face and makes recommendations on how their lives can be improved. Thank you to all the carers and Network partners who contributed.
Outcomes: 
Wellbeing
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, February 6, 2017 - 15:15
Main Image: 
Retirement on Hold report
Body: 

Download the Retirement on Hold report (PDF, 406KB)

Key findings from our report

  • Care coordination – carers said they were spending too much time, and became stressed and anxious when trying to organise care and support for the person with care needs. 
  • Carers are caring for someone else when they have their own age-related health condition.
  • The pressures around carers feeling they had a 'duty to care' – the Care Act recognises that caring should be a choice.
  • Lack of appropriate replacement care to enable carers to take a break. 

Our key recommendations

  • Access to a 'care coordinator' – many older carers felt this would help them navigate the health and care system. It is recognised that with limited resources this may not be feasible, however, earlier referral to a carer organisation may help improve the situation for carers. 
  • Appropriate and timely access to information and advice about support available locally, nationally and UK wide. This information would need to recognise that not all older carers are able to access the internet.
  • Improved access to appropriate and good quality replacement care.

If you know a carer who is looking for support please direct them to our local support on Carers.org or ask them to phon 0300 772 9600 or email support@carers.org.

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PDF icon Retirement on Hold report (PDF, 406KB)
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Research

Dads care too: A survey of the experiences of fathers who are carers

Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum sought to learn more about men’s experiences of caring, the impact it has on their lives and the support services they feel would be helpful to them.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingCarer awarenessCarers in employment
I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carersFamilies
Caring for: 
Young peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 13:00
Body: 

[file:field-file-image-alt-text]Caring is often seen as a ‘female’ issue but it is something that affects a large number of men too. The 2011 Census found that in England and Wales more than 4 in 10 carers are male (42.3%) - amounting to 2.44 million men providing care, unpaid, for a friend or family member who due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction.

Despite their vast number, there has been little research to understand the experiences of these men or the vital role that they play in their families.

Carers Trust and the Men’s Health Forum sought to learn more about men’s experiences of caring, the impact it has on their lives and the support services they feel would be helpful to them. A total of 609 male carers from across the UK took part in a survey which included 119 fathers, all of whom were caring for a child or children with a disability, long term conditions or mental health or addiction issue. PDF iconDads care too: A survey of the experiences of fathers who are carers showcases the experiences of these dads.

Key findings

  • 119 dads responded, of all ages.
  • The highest proportion (72%) care for a son or daughter with a learning disability or autism.
  •  Nearly 20% had been caring for 21 years or more.
  • 35% cared alongside being in employment. 40% of those spent 60 or more hours caring per week.
  • A third of dads reported that they never get a break.
  • 46% said caring had a negative impact on their mental health, and 43% said it had a negative impact on their physical health.
  • Almost three quarters said they missed out on spending time with friends and family members as a result of being a carer.
  • The most common support wanted but not received was breaks from their caring role.
  • 55% said they felt the needs of male carers were different from female carers.
  • Many felt their role as a carer was not recognised, or that services were not designed in a way which met their needs.
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PDF icon Dads care too: A survey of the experiences of fathers who are carers
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Research

Full of Care Report - Young Carers in Wales 2009

In 2009 the Children's Commissioner at the time, Keith Towler, launched new research and recommendations for Young Carers Services in Wales.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Primary careHealth and wellbeingInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young carers
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:45
Body: 

The report, entitled Full of Care, aimed to show the barriers young carers face achieving the rights laid out by the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child, such as the right to education, to relax and play and to have their views respected. 

The document included the research project 'All Right Gov' that Powys Carers Service carried out in Summer 2008, travelling all over Wales to meet other young carers projects and listening to their experiences.

The report made a number of recommendations to both Welsh Government and Local Service Boards as well as Local Authorities, Health and The Department of Children, Education Lifelong Learning and Skills.

Early identification and intervention

The fact that 54% of young carers in this survey felt that they only got support in a crisis underlines the importance of early identification and intervention. However, the young carers who took part in this survey were those who had been identified and were receiving support. 

Much of the existing guidance is intended to prevent crises arising through early identification and intervention. It is clear though that there is often a considerable gap between national policy and local practice.

The message ‘Too little, too late’ still resonates today.

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