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Young Carers in Schools Step-by-step Guide tools (Wales)

Find all the tools you need to work through the Wales edition of the Young Carers in Schools Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff.
Outcomes: 
WellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Social careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung people
Location: 
Wales
Date Revised: 
Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 08:45
Body: 

Supporting young carers in schools in Wales

Designed with teachers and schools staff,  the Young Carers in Schools Step-by-step Guide for Leaders, Teachers and Non-teaching Staff, helps make the identification and support of young carers in schools in primary and secondary schools in Wales as easy as possible. Set out in ten clear steps, the tools accompanying the guide are available for you to download and adapt to suit your school and purpose. Each step contains a range of tools including templates, proformas and exemplars.

Not all schools will need to use all the tools included here. Some may find it more helpful to choose those that help enhance the support they already offer to young carers and their families while others will want to simply start to build their activities over a number of years. See related links for the Welsh versions.

Step 1 - Gaining an understanding about young carers

Key infomation only. See Step by Step Guide 

Step 2 - Reviewing your school's provision for young carers

FileTool 1: Baseline review

FileTool 2: A proforma for making recommendations to school leaders

FileTool 3: How to gather young carers' views about your school's provision

FileTool 4: Checklist for gathering attendance, attainment and progress data - primary schools

FileTool 5: Checklist for gathering attendance, attainment and progress data - secondary schools

FileTool 6: Survey to assess levels of school staff understanding and confidence in meeting young carers' needs

Step 3 - Securing commitment from school leaders

FileTool 1: Young Carers Senior Leadership Team Lead duties checklist

FileTool 2: Exemplar introductory letter to governors about young carers

FileTool 3: Role and responsibilities of a governing body

FileTool 4: Checklist to support governing bodies evaluating the effectiveness of their schools provision for young carers and their families

FileTool 5: Targeting Pupil Development Grant funding (if eligible) to support young carers

Step 4 - Introducing a Young Carers School Operational Lead

FileTool 1: Young Carers School Operational Lead duties checklist

Step 5 - Acknowledging young carers in principle school documents

FileTool 1: Recommended points to include in a whole school commitment

FileTool 2: Young carers school policy checklist

FileTool 3: Checklist of other principle documents which should reference young carers

Step 6 - Setting up systems to identify, assess and support young carers

FileTool 1: Checklist of support young carers may need

FileTool 2: Running a peer support group for young carers

FileTool 3: Exemplar handout for pupils to complete and post into a message box

FileTool 4: How to run a young carers forum

FileTool 5: Working with school nurses to support young carers and their families

FileTool 6: Working in partnership with young carers services

FileTool 7: Checklist for effective partnership working between schools and young carers services

FileTool 8: Exemplar working together agreement for use with young carers services

FileTool 9: Supporting young carers to participate post 16

FileTool 10: Supporting young carers to transition into adulthood

FileTool 11: Checklist of support that families of young carers may need

Step 7 - Raising awareness of school staff about young carers

FileTool 1: Checklist of signs a pupil is a young carer

Tool 2: Exemplar staff noticeboard material

FileTool 3: How can school staff support young carers

FileTool 4: Staff training facilitator's guide

FileTool 5: Powerpoint for use in staff training

FileTool 6: Handouts for use in staff training

FileTool 7: Staff training evaluation forms

Step 8 - Raising awareness of pupils and families about young carers

Tool 1: Exemplar noticeboard material for primary schools

Tool 2: Exemplar noticeboard material for secondary schools

Tool 3: Suggested assembly/tutor group activities

Tool 4: Suggested lesson activities

FileTool 5: Exemplar letter to parent)s)/guardian(s)

FileTool 6: Exemplar school newsletter article

Step 9 - Identifying, asssessing and supporting young carers and their families

FileTool 1: Exemplar information sharing consent form

FileTool 2: The Multidimensional Assessment of Caring Activities (MACA)

FileTool 3: The Positive and Negatives Outcomes of Caring (PANOC)

FileTool 4: Well-being questionnaire

FileTool 5: Staff observational checklist

Step 10 - Sharing good pratice with others

FileTool 1: Sharing good practice - case study examples

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Toolkit for Initial Teacher Education (ITE) Providers

This toolkit provides essential tools, templates and guidance for ITE providers who already include young carers as a key topic within their training programmes and ITE providers who are developing their training content regarding young carers.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needs
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health careMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for young carersSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 13:15
Downloads: 
PDF icon Supporting Young Carers in Schools: A Toolkit for Initial Teacher Education Providers
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Time to think about you

Time to think about you is a new resource which has been co-produced with The Health Innovation Network (HIN) in South London to help carers self-identify and access support.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
Carer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careCarers services
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:00
Body: 

Time to think about you prompt card with slipThe Health Innovation Network and Carers Trust have worked with carers on Time to think about you.

Time to think about you is a project to encourage unpaid carers to be more aware of their own health, and the support available to them at their local GP and carers services.

We have developed a range of materials for this project, including a poster and prompt cards.

You can help us to raise awareness among carers by sharing these, putting them up in your workspaces, and giving them out to any carers you may know. 

Download the Time to think about you materials

The PDF above includes a slip that carers will hand to GPs and/or their local carer service.

Below are other versions of the prompt card and slip, and a larger A3 poster. Or if you work with carers and you want to print out several copies to hand out there is a PDF with 4 prompt cards to a page: 

Downloads: 
PDF icon Time to think about you A4 poster, with slip (PDF, 103KB)PDF icon Time to think about you - 4 prompt cards to a page (PDF, 188KB)
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Supporting Young Carers Aged 5–8: A Resource for Professionals Working with Younger Carers

I work in: 
Carers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEducation
I work with: 
Young carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 10:00
Body: 

Many people are shocked to hear that children as young as five years old have caring responsibilities.

However, the 2011 Census found that there were nearly 10 000 young carers aged 5–7 in England and Wales. Furthermore, the figures showed an 83% increase since 2001 in the number of 5–7 year olds providing unpaid care (UK Census, 2011).

This worrying rise in the number of very young children caring for family and friends, along with the many unidentified young carers, clearly demonstrates the need for the law to protect this vulnerable group of children and young people.

The Children and Families Act 2014 now gives young carers in England a right to an assessment of their own needs, no matter how much caring they do. Local authorities must proactively identify young carers, prevent them from having excessive and inappropriate caring roles and use a whole family approach to consider how the needs of a young carer or young adult carer are linked to the needs of a person receiving care.

Despite the fact that there are children under eight who have caring responsibilities, many services for young carers only start working with children once they reach eight years old. One of the reasons for this is uncertainty around whether a service working with very young carers is required to register with Ofsted.

As a result, many services are not targeting young carers under eight years old and young carers services in general may not have the expertise, resources or knowledge to work with this age group.

Part one of PDF iconSupporting Young Carers Aged 5-8: A Resource for Professionals Working with Younger Carers aims to bring clarity for services working with young carers, as to whether or not it is necessary for them to register with Ofsted if they choose to work with children under eight years old. This will of course depend on what a service delivers, however for some, as the guidance shows, registration may not be necessary. Part two presents some local practice being undertaken by Carers Trust Network Partner, Carers Lewisham, with young carers aged 5–8 and sets out what has been achieved by working with this young age group. 

We hope that taken together, this resource will inspire services to start supporting very young carers and will provide them with ideas about what support is useful, as well as how to deliver such a service.

As a consequence of dedicated support for this age group, it is also hoped that awareness of younger carers by other services and professionals will also improve, so that children and their families are identified earlier and receive timely support.

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PDF icon Supporting Young Carers Aged 5–8: A Resource for Professionals Working with Younger Carers
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Young Carers in Schools Resources for Young Carers Services and Local Authorities

These resources make it as easy as possible for young carers services and local authorities to raise school awareness of the Young Carers in Schools programme in their local area.
I work in: 
Carers servicesEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Young adult carersYoung carers
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Friday, October 16, 2015 - 09:15
Body: 

Young Carers in Schools is a free England wide initiative making it as easy as possible for schools to support young carers and awarding good practice. 

Run jointly by Carers Trust and The Children’s Society Young Carers in Focus partners, Young Carers in Schools supports and celebrates effective local partnership working.  It is funded by The Queen’s Trust and Big Lottery Fund until March 2017. 

How does Young Carers in Schools support local partnership working with schools?

  • Celebrating effective partnership working through the Young Carers in Schools Award – validating the hard work carried out locally to develop good links between schools and young carers services.
  • Raising the profile of young carer support in schools.
  • Encouraging schools to take a proactive approach to developing and maintaining effective links with their local young carers service, supporting timely and appropriate referrals.
  • Raising schools’ awareness of young carers’ rights under the Care Act 2014 and the Children and Families Act 2014.

Tools for local authorities and young carers services:

Reflecting the differing capacities of young carers services and local authorities, a range of tools are available to make it as easy as possible for you to raise school awareness of the programme locally, including:

 

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Caring About Older Carers: Providing Support for People Caring Later in Life

This toolkit is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecialist servicesDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersParent carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 09:15
Body: 

The 2011 Census revealed that there are over 1.8 million carers aged 60 and over in England – almost 16% of the population in this age range. This includes a huge 20% of the population in the 60–64 age group, compared with 12.6 % of the overall population. The number of carers aged 85 and over grew by 128% in the last decade (Carers UK and Age UK, 2015).

[file:field-file-image-alt-text]This group is often invisible, with many older carers providing long hours of vital care and support while their own health and wellbeing deteriorates, resulting in poor physical and mental health, financial strain, and breakdown in their ability to carry on caring.

With an ageing population and increasing demand on health and social care services, supporting older carers better is a key way of keeping people at home, independent and healthy. It can also help to reduce unplanned hospital admissions and avoid premature admission to residential care.

What this toolkit aims to do

The toolkit PDF iconCaring About Older Carers: Providing Support for People Caring Later in Life is targeted at commissioners of health and social care in England and aims to highlight the needs of carers aged over 60 and to show tried and tested ways they can be supported. It shines a spotlight on particular issues most likely to impact on older carers, influenced by factors such as their own life stage, who they are caring for, their circumstances and their own health. This can help inform commissioning to properly and most cost-effectively support them.

It will also help commissioners fulfil duties to prevent, reduce and delay needs and to support older carers under the Care Act 2014. It is important to remember that older carers are not a homogenous group. Every carer has specific and personal circumstances. The needs and wishes of each individual carer and responses to them will be unique but there are clear recurring issues which, through listening to the needs of older carers in your community and commissioning good quality services, can help older carers stay healthy, independent, and more able to maintain choice and control over their own lives.

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PDF icon Caring About Older Carers: Providing Support for People Caring Later in Life
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Carers Hub - a commissioners tool for mapping local services in consultation with carers

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessAlcohol MisuseSubstance MisuseSpecial education needsPrimary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersYoung carersParent carersSibling carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adultsYoung peopleChildren
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 10:30
Body: 

The Carers’ Hub is a model of comprehensive carers support, developed by Carers Trust with assistance from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and funding from the Department of Health. It can be used as a resource for all those looking to commission and develop personalised services for carers.

Carers Hub

At the centre of the Hub diagram are the outcomes of the refreshed National Carers Strategy for England. The white band represents a three-pronged approach that can be used to inform strategic planning, and the 17 spokes on the outside of the circle illustrate the complete range of interventions that every area needs in order to deliver the intended outcomes.

Using The Carers Hub
Local strategic planning
Download resources

Using the Carers Hub

The Carers’ Hub can be used in consultation with carers and local services as a tool to map local carer need and service provision. In order to assess what mixture of interventions might be necessary to achieve the outcomes of the National Carers’ Strategy in a local area, the first step would be to carry out consultation to establish:

  • what services are currently available
  • which of the National Carers’ Strategy outcomes are being met
  • which groups are being served
  • what local carers and their families want.

A simple way to do this is by printing large copies of the Hub and asking carers to write comments or attach post-it notes under the interventions that are well provided locally. Then use another copy of the Hub (or different colour post-it notes) to repeat the process asking carers to indicate where there are gaps in services. 

You may wish to ask carers to make notes on the post-its about the quality of services and who is providing them. As a separate exercise, you may wish to ask carers to repeat the process indicating how well each of the five outcomes at the centre of the Hub are being met. Involving professionals and local service providers in the process will help to give you a complete picture of services in your area.

Carers Hub after post-it excercise

The results of these exercises will help you to identify strengths, gaps and overlaps in local service provision, as well as areas where partnership working may help to make better use of resources. 

Back to Carers Hub menu

Local strategic planning

The Hub's three-pronged approach to local strategic planning - in the white middle band of the Hub: carer-led, identify and include and whole-area - can then be applied in order to inform the development and implementation of the most appropriate mix of interventions. 

Ideally, carer representatives and professionals should sit down together to analyse the messages and identify priorities, so it may be best to carry out this process at meetings (for example, of carer strategy groups or multi-disciplinary agency groups).

The results of the Carers’ Hub consultation process can help to inform Joint Strategic Needs Assessments, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and other audit and planning processes, and maximise resources through the development of more efficient services and partnerships. The process can be repeated at a later date in order to help monitor local progress on strategy implementation.

Although the terminology on the Hub comes from English legislation, the rationale and process are applicable across the whole of the UK.

Back to Carers Hub menu

Download resources

Download a high-resolution version of the Carers' Hub diagram for use in consultation meetings. There is also a Office presentation iconPowerpoint version of the Hub with editable text boxes to make notes and/or compile your results.

Further details of the origins of the Hub and how to assess local services in relation to the Carers' Strategy can be found in Commissioning for Carers: an Action Guide for Decision-Makers and Commissioning Better Outcomes for Carers.

Back to Carers Hub menu

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‘Making the Road less Rocky for carers’ When decisions about residential and end of life care have to made

It is important to recognise that when the person with dementia goes into hospital or a residential setting the caring role does not stop. Carers will continue to offer social, emotional and nutritional support.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 15, 2015 - 14:00
Body: 

This section is particularly relevant to social care and health staff

My husband was considered to be ‘bed blocking’…the social worker told me about four different options that might be suitable for my husband but each one I looked at seemed even more unsuitable than the last, this information should be linked in to when the person gets a diagnosis…considerations of moving, financial aspects, possibilities of staying together, problems of living apart…all has to go into the melting pot and a solution gradually reached. 

Advice and support about continuing to care at home

There are a number of factors which may precipitate a need for the carer to consider residential care, these are particularly when the person with dementia is no longer safe at home, develops difficult behavioural problems or becomes incontinent. Carers value support and information from professionals when having to make a decision about residential care, as there may be conflicting views from the person with dementia, the carer and possibly the wider family. In order to save time and disappointment information on which local residential care options offer the correct support for the person they care for is vital. Carers will often have mixed emotions and benefit from emotional support during this period of change.

Helpful resources:

Clear information on all care options

Information at an early stage on the availability and costs of different care options would help relieve some of the stress and panic when the carer is no longer able, or is unwilling to care. Sometimes carers will find themselves having to research care options in a hurry following an accident at home, a hospital stay or the failure of their own health. Carers can feel under pressure to find a place quickly when the person with dementia is ready to be discharged from hospital.

For carers of people with rare types of dementia and/ or young onset dementia, finding an appropriate residential home can be particularly difficult, it is quite possible there will be no local provision therefore it is important national as well as local information is made available at an early stage to enable more effective planning for the future.

It is important to note that when the person with dementia goes into residential care, that this is not the end of the caring role, carers often go in regularly and give social, emotional and practical support.

Active involvement of carers in decisions about end of life care

Carers can make a valuable contribution, in discussions about end of life care and can take an active role in the planning and delivery of the care needed, they know the person with dementia well, so will have insight into their wishes, There may be an Advance statement and Lasting Power of Attorney in place giving instruction on end of life care. Professionals can support carers to recognise difficult emotions they feel during this period and refer for appropriate support.

Ideally information about LPA and planning for end of life care should be given early on, following diagnosis, while the person with dementia still has capacity. Making decisions on someone else’s behalf can be very difficult and stressful, so planning ahead is vital.

Following bereavement carers may experience different emotions including loss, relief, and guilt caring will have been a large part of their life and a feeling of loss of purpose is not uncommon. Good support during this time can help the carer consider their options, for the future and prevent a deterioration in their own health.

Planning ahead and having the opportunity to discuss the possibilities, of life after caring could help ease the trauma carers may feel at this pivotal time. Encouraging carers to take time out while they are caring to maintain their social activities will help prevent further isolation when their caring responsibilities end

Helpful Resources:

Downloads: 
PDF icon A Road Less Rocky PDF icon 'Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers' A guide for supporting carers of people with dementia
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'Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers' When the carer's own circumstances change

While critical points for carers are often linked to the progression of the dementia, they may be unrelated and are not necessarily sequential with the health of the person they care for.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carers
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Monday, May 18, 2015 - 13:30
Body: 

This section is particularly relevant to social care and carers services

Regular carers’ assessments and reviews

Carers of people with dementia will often be in the role for a number of years, and are likely to be elderly themselves, therefore have their own health issues. Younger carers may well be managing work, other family commitments and caring, therefore it is highly likely that their own circumstance will change at some point.

I was frightened of what I was getting into, and as long as I didn’t seek help and get ‘into the system’ as it were, I could go on kidding myself that this wasn’t happening and things might not deteriorate

The wellbeing of the carer and person with dementia are not necessarily sequential. The carer’s wellbeing can be affected by many different factors including their own health; this can have a significant impact on their ability or willingness to continue in their caring role. Carers may also experience a change in their family, employment or financial situation.

All carers have their own needs, commitments and responsibilities therefore their circumstance could change at any time. A good quality carer’s assessment, and review structure is vital to highlight any changes or foreseeable changes in the carer’s circumstances and give consideration to any support and advice that will help.

Helpful Resources:

Supporting carers to maintain their own health

It is well documented that carers of people with dementia have poor health outcomes, the more demanding the caring role is the less likely carers are to look after, or seek help with regard to their own health. Carers typically report they experience high levels of stress, and struggle with their mental and physical health. Carers of people with dementia can also face the added pressure from stigma associated with the condition, and face particular difficulties in accessing practical and emotional support .

Carers will have contact with health and care professionals in the context of their caring role giving professionals an opportunity to ask them about their own health. It’s an opportunity to check they are managing to attend appointments as well as exploring opportunities and encouraging them to take a break. In some areas free respite services are available for carers to attend medical appointments, including short hospital stays. Local social care and carers service should be able to advise whether there is such a scheme in the area. 

Resources for carers:

Work Life Balance

Maintaining employment can be very important to carers, allowing them to keep their sense of self, have a break from caring and ensure financial security. Carers have the right to request flexible working and time off under the Work & Families Act 2006 and are protected against discrimination at work under the Equality Act 2010. Carers and their employers are not always aware of these rights, resulting in carers giving up work before other options are explored.

A timely referral for a community care assessment for the person with dementia and a carer’s assessment will allow an opportunity to explore different care options that maybe available, such as personal budgets allowing the carer to stay in employment. 

Carers who work part time may be entitled to Carers Allowance, and other benefits depending upon their financial, family and housing situation. Local advice centres will be able to do a benefits check, to ensure the person with dementia and their carer are receiving everything they are entitled to.   

Helpful resources:

Downloads: 
PDF icon A Road Less Rocky - Supporting Carers of People with DementiaPDF icon 'Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers' A guide for supporting carers of people with dementia
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‘Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers’ When the person with dementia becomes incontinent

Managing incontinence can be a pivotal point in the breakdown of the caring role, and is a subject carers are sometimes embarrassed to raise.
Area of Care: 
Mental HealthPhysical illnessSpecialist servicesDay centreRehab CentreHospitalCare homesPrimary CareSecondary CareAcute CareDementia care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersSocial careCommissioning
I work with: 
Adult carersYoung adult carersFamilies
Caring for: 
AdultsOlder adults
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Friday, May 15, 2015 - 12:30
Body: 

This section is particularly relevant to GP’s, primary health staff and continence nurses

Incontinence was a problem, I feel I didn’t have any help with it even though we had a Continence Nurse. They used to provide pants, but they just stopped. ... It was all the issues around the incontinence that were the final straw ... it would be all over the carpet and he had walked in it, and I thought ‘I just can’t cope with this’.

Professionals and carers planning for continence issues

Having early discussions with carers about possible continence issues enables them to plan and access appropriate help and support earlier. Carers may not seek help regarding continence problems because of embarrassment. Therefore it is better if the subject can be raised by GPs and other health staff; the carer may well be struggling when it is a medical condition that could be treated or managed.

Carers interviewed for A Road Less Rocky cited incontinence along with difficult behaviour as a primary reason for looking into residential care. Receiving good timely advice on how to manage incontinence is vital and may help towards preventing a break down in the caring role. A referral to the local continence service will ensure carers are given the right advice on management and products available.  

Resources for carers:

Carers will feel more confident about caring for someone with continence problems, if they and the person they care for have access to, and advice on appropriate products and whether they are available on prescription. This will prevent carers purchasing unnecessarily or incorrect items.

Resources for carers:

Information and advice about dealing with incontinence

Carers can struggle with the management of incontinence, it can be a pivotal point in the ‘caring journey’. Timely substantial advice and professional support can help carers to manage more effectively. Caring for someone with dementia and incontinence has extra pressures, due to their cognitive impairment, people with dementia may not be able to manage and resist using the aids. There are simple measures and strategies carers can put in place which could help.

Resources for carers:

Practical help with laundry

Caring for someone who is incontinent is expensive and time consuming, carers even where they are receiving statuary supplies find themselves topping up on products. The household laundry will increase, adding to the carer’s workload. Practical help in the home and outside laundry services can help and it is always good practice to check the carer has a working washing machine and dryer. There are a number of local and national charitable organisations, including furniture projects that can help with funding towards washing machines and dryers. 

Helpful Resources:

Downloads: 
PDF icon A Road Less RockyPDF icon 'Making the Road Less Rocky for Carers' A guide for supporting carers of people with dementia
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