Toolkit

Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

The role of the Pharmacy Carers Champion

Details of the skills, knowledge and role of the Pharmacy Carers Champion.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
WellbeingHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHealth and wellbeingPharmacy ServicesCarers servicesSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 14:30
Body: 

The role of the pharmacy carers champion includes:

  • attending carer awareness training
  • attending Carers’ Champion meetings, a maximum of twice a year
  • maintaining and refreshing your Carers Notice Board or other information point for carers within your pharmacy
  • displaying and maintaining supplies of carers’ leaflets and, where possible, posters in your pharmacy
  • identifying yourself to customers as a Carers’ Champion by having your name displayed on your Carers’ Notice Board and wearing a Carers’ Champion badge or sash
  • co-ordinating carer referrals and other initiatives relating to carers
  • reading Carers Champion E-bulletins and brief colleagues.

Skills and knowledge

  • enthusiasm and motivation for the role
  • basic understanding of carers’ needs or a willingness to learn
  • empathy for carers.

A Carers Champion is not expected to be an expert on ‘carers issues’ or provide carers with one-to-one support.   

Related pages

Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

Commissioning for Carers Key Principles

Without support, taking on a caring role can mean facing a life of poverty, isolation, ill health and depression. For the person they care for it can mean costly hospital or care admissions if the caring relationship
Area of Care: 
Primary CareSecondary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health careCarers servicesCarers involvementInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersSocial careCommissioning
Location: 
England
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:45
Body: 

Commissioning for Carers – Key Principles for Clinical Commissioning Groups

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) across England are under enormous pressure to meet financial targets and priority areas for improvements within the NHS.

Commissioning for Carers PDF screenshot

PDF iconcommissioning for carers - key principles for CCGs demonstrates how commissioning for carers can help CCGs deliver desired outcomes and make savings across health and social care.

Commissioning well for carers can:

  • reduce admissions to hospital and residential care
  • reduce costs of delays in transfers of care
  • reduce carers’ need to access primary care as a result of their caring role
  • reduce overall spending on care. 

Largest providers of care

Carers are the largest providers of care and support in each area of the UK. The economic value of the contribution they make is £119bn per year. The moral and financial arguments for supporting carers are clear – without support, taking on a caring role can mean facing a life of poverty, isolation, ill health and depression. For the person they care for it can mean costly hospital or care admissions if the caring relationship breaks down.

Commissioning for Carers

In 2009 Carers Trust produced PDF iconcommissioning for carers jointly with Association of Directors for adult Social Services (ADASS)Carers UKLGA and other national bodies.  

This step by step guide aims to assist commissioners in health and social care in supporting carers through the commissioning cycle.  Accompanying the main guide is a shorter PDF iconaction guide for decision makers.

Key Recommendations in the guides include: 

  • think ‘carer’ in all commissioning and joint strategic needs assessments
  • improve outcomes, independence and choices for both carers and those they care for
  • involve carers of all groups and communities in decision – making and planning process
  • strengthen the carers support provider market, using of funding approaches. 
Commissioning for Carers was produced prior to the restructure to the NHS in 2013. Therefore it refers to old bodies and commissioning structures that no longer exist. However the key principles and learnings are transferable.  

Tools to support commissioners identify needs and develop services for carers

The Carers’ Hub is a resource for all those looking to identify needs, and commission and develop services for carers. 

The results of the Carers’ Hub consultation process can help to inform Joint Strategic Needs Assessments, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and other audit and planning processes, and maximise resources through the development of more efficient services and partnerships. It can also help monitor local progress on strategy implementation.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Commissioning for carers - key principles for CCGsPDF icon Action guide for decision makers
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

Working in partnership with community pharmacies in Scotland

NHS Carer Information Strategies must as a minimum demonstrate how NHS Boards are making community-based pharmacists aware of their role in supporting the Strategy.
Area of Care: 
Primary Care
Outcomes: 
PreventionIdentifying carers
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsHealth and wellbeingPharmacy Services
Location: 
Scotland
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 10:45
Body: 

Identification of Carers by Community Pharmacists in Scotland

NHS Carer Information Strategies must as a minimum demonstrate how NHS Boards are making community-based pharmacists aware of their role in supporting the Strategy.

The Carers Trust ‘Focus on Carers’ Initiative identified successful methodologies and models of good practice to identify and support carers through joint work between community pharmacists and local Carers Centres, one of which is highlighted below.

The Princess Royal Trust Moray Carers Centre

The centre manager contacted the local pharmacist in Forres, who was very enthusiastic and briefed the pharmacy staff on the implementation of the initiative. The cards and letters were delivered to the pharmacy and the initiative got underway.

The manager contacted the pharmacy at regular intervals to update the staff on the outcomes and numbers of carers identified.

To build on this enthusiasm, the centre manager arranged with the press for articles to appear in the local newspapers promoting the initiative, including photographs of the pharmacy. This not only publicised the search for hidden carers, by raising awareness in the newspapers’ readership, but also provided an excellent incentive when introducing the idea to other pharmacists.

Successful outcomes

The outcomes were very successful for this approach. A total of 8,340 cards were handed out by the pharmacy, and produced 100 responses from carers, which is a 1.2% return.

Approximately two thirds of those carers identified asked to be included on the centre’s mailing list, whilst the remainder requested help in areas such as benefit checks and information about the law regarding disability, and how to access additional services.

Although surprised at the level of response, the centre had made sure they would be prepared, by having the initial information and resource packs ready to be sent to the carers.

Downloads: 
PDF icon Moray freepost pharmacy cardPDF icon Moray pharmacy letter
Share it: 
Protected: 
No
Type of Content: 
Toolkit

Involving carers in planning

People performing a role usually best understand it. Talking to carers can often give you information about the services you provide that you could not get in any other way.
Outcomes: 
PreventionWellbeingIntegrationHealth inequalitiesCarer awarenessIdentifying carersCarers in employment
I work in: 
Health carePrimary careHospitalsMental health careHealth and wellbeingCarers servicesCarers involvementCarers breaksInformation and adviceCommissioning for carersCommissioning for young carersEmploymentSocial careEducationCommissioning
Location: 
Whole UK
Date Revised: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 08:00
Body: 

Why involve carers?

People performing a role usually best understand it. Talking to carers can often give you information about the services you provide that you could not get in any other way.

They are your key partners and can frequently become patients themselves when unsupported. All recent legislation on health and social care emphasises the need to involve users and carers in the planning and development of services.

What should carers be involved in?

Training

Carers should always be involved in any training on carer awareness. Carers’ experiences tend to be personal and not shared with the world. Much of what they do takes place at home. Their timetables are dictated by the needs of the person they care for and services they receive.

Carers can also usefully contribute to other forms of training where they can offer a unique perspective through their personal experiences – for instance:

  • expert patients programmes
  • person-centred planning
  • community services.

You may think you know what they do, but it is easy to be shocked and surprised by what they can tell you about the reality of their lives. There is no better way of understanding carers than listening to them.

Planning

As frequent users of services, most carers have expert knowledge of both Primary Care and Hospitals, how they run and what might help them to work better from a patient and carers standpoint.

Carers also know better than anyone what their personal wants and needs are.  When working in a public/ charity sector the experience of the carer needs to be acknowledged and drawn from when planning new projects or strategic objections.

Involving carers – individually and collectively - in planning for changes and new services can include their unique perspective.

This can be done by:

  • having a carer representative on planning groups
  • through patient and public involvement structures
  • questionnaires
  • large scale consultations
  • through collective structures such as carers’ forums.

How do we find the carers to get involved?

Your local carers centre or carers support organisation can help you to find carers to be involved in training or planning.

Practical issues

Carers may need support to get involved. This could be:

Timing and location of meetings
This can be critical to the ability of carers to attend andparticipate. It is usually easier for carers to be available in the middle of the working day. Ideally the venue needs to be easily accessible by car or on public transport. Many carers are on low incomes so it is helpful to offer to reimburse travel expenses.

Respite care 
Some carers may need to make arrangements for the person theycare for to be looked after while they are at the meeting. This will generally be charged for, so it is helpful to make it clear that you will reimburse costs incurred.

Support 
Carers involved in planning or training appreciate having the chance to share their experiences with other carers or professionals involved with carers support. These opportunities also help carers to have a less personal and more representative approach. This can be facilitated through the local carers centres and schemes

Share it: 

Pages